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Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the slopes; skier

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Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the slopes; skier  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 05 Jun 2018, 01:10
2
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A
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C
D
E

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  75% (hard)

Question Stats:

43% (01:37) correct 57% (01:27) wrong based on 155 sessions

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Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the slopes; skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are no slopes without music.


(A) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are

(B) because skiers can choose hard rock, soft pop, or “beautiful music,” there are

(C) however, skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music,” and

(D) although skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are

(E) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music” slopes, but

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Originally posted by alimad on 25 Jun 2007, 08:52.
Last edited by Bunuel on 05 Jun 2018, 01:10, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic, edited the question and added the OA.
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Re: Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the slopes; skier  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2007, 11:58
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19. Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the slopes; skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are no slopes without music.
(A) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are
'slopes, there are' is incorrect since conjunction is missing
(B) because skiers can choose hard rock, soft pop, or “beautiful music,” there are
causal meaning is wrong
(C) however, skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music,” and
'and' does not make sense
(D) although skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are
'although skiers can choose X, Y and Z, there are no W' correct contrast
(E) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music” slopes, but
'but are no slopes...' incorrect
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Re: north carolina  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2009, 15:13
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A "there are no slopes without music" is a new complete clause. It does not make sense to put at the end of the phrase, specially after a coma.
B "Because...., there are no..." is not a reasonable conclusion. Because they can chose there are no slopes without music? What about: "Because the antennas are installed through all the resorts, there are no slopes without music." That makes more sense.
C The "However" indicates that a contrast will come. But "skiers can choose among hard rock,..." is not a contrast
D CORRECT. A contrast is not needed to make sense with the whole phrase; however, when it adds "although", then a clear contrast follows the clause. Although you can chose among a lot of styles, you can not ski without hearing some music.
E "but no slopes without music " does not make a parallel comparison with the previous clause.

Well, here is my attempt to explain SC questions. As you can see in my punctuation Verbal is not my strong.

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Re: ski resorts  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Apr 2010, 23:24
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IMO D. It took me 3 min to reach at D.

If you have noticed that we have ;. So we need next part of the sentence not dependent on the introductory part.
In D, we have a clear contrast b/w different slopes and no slopes without music. Let's see what others have:

Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the slopes; skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are no slopes without music.

(A) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are
(B) because skiers can choose hard rock, soft pop, or “beautiful music,” there are [there seems many examples and subclauses here separated by a comma. This is sentence framentation. Incorrect]
(C) however, skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music,” and [This is close contender but in the end, it fails to maintain ||sm on adjective (hard, soft,..., no slopes). Incorrect]
(D) although skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are [Correct. We have a contrast introdued by Although and all parts are in sync]
(E) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music” slopes, but [The subclause introduced by BUT is awkward and misleads. Incorrect]
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Re: ski resorts  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2010, 04:02
The 2nd part of the question is referring to slopes with music and slopes without music. Skiers have the option of choosing slopes with music however they don't have the option of choosing one with out music. Hence D :-D

(A) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are So? Improper conclusion
(B) because skiers can choose hard rock, soft pop, or “beautiful music,” there are - Causal effect is not proper
(C) however, skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music,” and - Categorizing slopes with no music along with various music options
(D) although skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are - :-D
(E) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music” slopes, but - does not refer to the skier's option
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Re: ski resorts  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2010, 05:55
D for me for using the right construction of an independent but related sentence after a semicolon, for selecting the preposition among because there are more than two choices and for employing the conjunction and to indicate that the series of the choices is coming to an end
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Re: north carolina  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2011, 05:22
The 2nd part of the question is referring to slopes with music and slopes without music. Skiers have the option of choosing slopes with music however they don't have the option of choosing one with out music. Hence D :-D

(A) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are So? Improper conclusion
(B) because skiers can choose hard rock, soft pop, or “beautiful music,” there are - Causal effect is not proper
(C) however, skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music,” and - Categorizing slopes with no music along with various music options
(D) although skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are - :-D
(E) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music” slopes, but - does not refer to the skier's option
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Re: Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2015, 14:41
There is absolutely no way that any option other than D can be correct. :)

(A) features a comma splice. "Skiers can choose . . . slopes" is an independent clause and so is "there are no slopes without music." To fix this, we either need to join the two clauses with a semicolon (unlikely, since we've already used a semicolon), join them with a conjunction (and, or, etc.), or make one of the statements dependent by adding while, although, etc.

(B) fixes the grammatical problem by using "because" to make the first clause dependent. However, now the meaning doesn't make sense. (B) is saying that there are no slopes without music because skiers can choose between three kinds of music. That doesn't work as an explanation.

(C) creates a false contrast by starting with "however." Choosing between 3 kinds of music doesn't contrast with the previous statement that most slopes have music. (C) also appears to fix the grammar problem by joining the two clauses with "and." However, notice that the word "slopes" has been removed. Now it says "Skiers can choose between X, Y, Z, and no slopes without music." This makes no sense!

(E) tries to fix the problem by using "but" to join the clauses. However, neither of the clauses works on its own in this version. The first part says "Skiers can choose among X, Y, Z slopes" (it's missing the "and" between Y and Z). The second part is no longer a clause at all because it has no verb: "but no slopes without music."

So that leaves (D). The only thing odd about (D) is that, like all the answer choices, the last part conflicts with the beginning. Why do we say that "most" slopes have music and then end by saying that there are no slopes without music? Something to ponder . . .
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Re: Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2015, 15:05
Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the slopes; skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are no slopes without music.

(A) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are
Incorrect. Run-on sentence. "There are no slopes" is not introduced by any conjunction.
(B) because skiers can choose hard rock, soft pop, or “beautiful music,” there are
Incorrect. Meaning change. It is not because they can choose the type of song that slopes without songs exist.
(C) however, skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music,” and
Incorrect. Meaning change.
(D) although skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are
Correct.
(E) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music” slopes, but
Incorrect. Awkward.
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Re: Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the slopes; skier  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2016, 09:40
Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the slopes; skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are no slopes without music.

A) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, and “beautiful music” slopes, there are
The conjunction contrasting “skiers can choose…” and “there are…” is missing, leaving the second sentence unfinished.
B) because skiers can choose hard rock, soft pop, or “beautiful music”, there are
The causal relationship is ambiguous and illogical.
Skiers cannot choose the type of music, but the type of slope.

C) however, skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music,” and
How can skiers choose among various types of music and “no slopes without music”? The last option is not logical in relation with the previous options.
Skiers cannot choose the type of music, but the type of slope.

E) skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop, “beautiful music” slopes, but
An "and” or an "or" is missing. “Skiers can choose among hard rock, soft pop and/or “beautiful music” slopes,…”.
The second part “but no slopes without music” is awkward and should be rephrased.
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Re: Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the  [#permalink]

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Re: Most North Carolina ski resorts broadcast music onto the   [#permalink] 12 Nov 2019, 05:32
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