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On a soccer team, one team member is selected at random to be the goal

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On a soccer team, one team member is selected at random to be the goal  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2017, 06:29
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On a soccer team, one team member is selected at random to be the goalie. What is the probability that a substitute player will be the goalie?

(1) One-sixth of the team members are substitute players.

(2) 18 of the team members are not substitute players.
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On a soccer team, one team member is selected at random to be the goal  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2017, 17:13
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vikasp99 wrote:
On a soccer team, one team member is selected at random to be the goalie. What is the probability that a substitute player will be the goalie?

(1) One-sixth of the team members are substitute players.

(2) 18 of the team members are not substitute players.

Dear vikasp99,

I'm happy to help. :-)

It's helpful to think in terms of two different "baskets" of information. One is "ratio" information, which includes fractions, percents, and probabilities--1/2 the group, 30% of the group, or the ratio of A to B in the group is 4:7. All of that is the same kind of information: we don't know the exact counts or numbers, and we can figure out anything else in the basket without knowing the counts.

The other is "counts" information, the actual number of individuals in categories. One count tells us nothing about the ratio information, but if we have single count + ratio information, we generally can figure out all the counts.

The prompt is asking for a probability.

Statement #1 give us a fraction, which is ratio information. This is the same basket as the prompt, so we can figure out the probability = 1/6. Sufficient.

Statement #2 gives us a single count, and we have no ratio information, so we can't figure out anything. Not sufficient.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: On a soccer team, one team member is selected at random to be the goal  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2017, 04:01
mikemcgarry wrote:
vikasp99 wrote:
On a soccer team, one team member is selected at random to be the goalie. What is the probability that a substitute player will be the goalie?

(1) One-sixth of the team members are substitute players.

(2) 18 of the team members are not substitute players.

Dear vikasp99,

I'm happy to help. :-)

It's helpful to think in terms of two different "baskets" of information. One is "ratio" information, which includes fractions, percents, and probabilities--1/2 the group, 30% of the group, or the ratio of A to B in the group is 4:7. All of that is the same kind of information: we don't know the exact counts or numbers, and we can figure out anything else in the basket without knowing the counts.
The other is "counts" information, the actual number of individuals in categories. One count tells us nothing about the ratio information, but if we have single count + ratio information, we generally can figure out all the counts.

The prompt is asking for a probability.

Statement #1 give us a fraction, which is ratio information. This is the same basket as the prompt, so we can figure out the probability = 1/6. Sufficient.

Statement #2 gives us a single count, and we have no ratio information, so we can't figure out anything. Not sufficient.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Can you further elaborate this explanation with example Mike ?
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Re: On a soccer team, one team member is selected at random to be the goal  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2017, 11:49
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akhiparth wrote:
Can you further elaborate this explanation with example Mike ?

Dear akhiparth

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I am going to chide you. What you asked in not a high quality question. You simply indicated that you need help without explaining anything about what you understand, what you don't understand, etc. Think about how much time & effort it took you to write that question--it probably wasn't a lot. Low effort = low reward. An excellent question is one that involves deep thought and reflection. See this blog:
Asking Excellent Questions

I will say that I meant to include a link in my original post. I went back an edited the post to include this link:
GMAT Quantitative: Ratio and Proportions

Here's my challenge to you. Read the blog on asking excellent question. Then, read the post on ratios and proportions. Come back here and study what I said above. If you still have questions at that point, I challenge to write the highest quality question about what I have said---include exactly what you understand, exactly which parts confuse you, and exactly the kind of clarification you would need to help you. Ask that excellent question, and I will be happy to answer it.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Mike McGarry
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Re: On a soccer team, one team member is selected at random to be the goal  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2018, 11:08
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Re: On a soccer team, one team member is selected at random to be the goal &nbs [#permalink] 24 Mar 2018, 11:08
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