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PLZ help me out of this question.

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Joined: 15 Aug 2017
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PLZ help me out of this question. [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2017, 21:55
Among the leading figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Countee Cullen is the writer whose role in that movement is most difficult to assess. This difficulty arises in part because his poetry emulates the style and tone of nineteenth century English Romanticism, but real complexity concerns his choice of subject matter. Cullen entered Harvard in 1925, to pursue a master in English, about the same time his collections of poems, Color, was published. Written in a careful, traditional style, the work celebrated black beauty and deplored the effects of racism. Cullen insisted on the freedom of the Black point to choose any subject: he believed that a restricted concern with race was a hindrance to the development of the Black artist, and he claimed that there is poetry written by Blacks, but not a linguistic category that could be called Black poetry. Yet he was quick to add that for the Black poet, escaping awareness of race was impossible, and Cullen was always in some way writing about being Black. By suffusing an essentially European literary tradition with race consciousness, Cullen in his own way succeeded in doing what other writers of the Harlem Renaissance were doing by experimenting with Black folk forms: making a lasting contribution to the growth of a distinctive African American voice.


The author’s conclusion about Cullen’s contribution to the development of a distinctive African American voice would be most weakened by the publication of which of the following?
(A)The diary of a writer of the Harlem Renaissance documenting the racial episodes in one of the writer’s novels.
(B) A survey of African American literature demonstrating Black writers’ ultimate rejection of European literary models.
(C) The poems of a nineteenth-century Black poet who used the forms of eighteen-century English poetry.
(D) An essay by a Black poet insisting on this responsibility of Black writers to address the issue of race in their writing.
(E) Folk tales from twentieth-century African American slave narratives of the nineteenth century


What're you guy's answer?

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New post 16 Aug 2017, 09:12
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Using elimination method i think it might be B!
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New post 16 Aug 2017, 10:20
laddaboy wrote:
Using elimination method i think it might be B!




I agree with you, but people around me are being attracted to "D", resolutely arguing that

How about D?

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Re: PLZ help me out of this question. [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2017, 23:49
showmikmik wrote:
Among the leading figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Countee Cullen is the writer whose role in that movement is most difficult to assess. This difficulty arises in part because his poetry emulates the style and tone of nineteenth century English Romanticism, but real complexity concerns his choice of subject matter. Cullen entered Harvard in 1925, to pursue a master in English, about the same time his collections of poems, Color, was published. Written in a careful, traditional style, the work celebrated black beauty and deplored the effects of racism. Cullen insisted on the freedom of the Black point to choose any subject: he believed that a restricted concern with race was a hindrance to the development of the Black artist, and he claimed that there is poetry written by Blacks, but not a linguistic category that could be called Black poetry. Yet he was quick to add that for the Black poet, escaping awareness of race was impossible, and Cullen was always in some way writing about being Black. By suffusing an essentially European literary tradition with race consciousness, Cullen in his own way succeeded in doing what other writers of the Harlem Renaissance were doing by experimenting with Black folk forms: making a lasting contribution to the growth of a distinctive African American voice.


The author’s conclusion about Cullen’s contribution to the development of a distinctive African American voice would be most weakened by the publication of which of the following?
(A)The diary of a writer of the Harlem Renaissance documenting the racial episodes in one of the writer’s novels.
(B) A survey of African American literature demonstrating Black writers’ ultimate rejection of European literary models.
(C) The poems of a nineteenth-century Black poet who used the forms of eighteen-century English poetry.
(D) An essay by a Black poet insisting on this responsibility of Black writers to address the issue of race in their writing.
(E) Folk tales from twentieth-century African American slave narratives of the nineteenth century


What're you guy's answer?

I would go with B. Here's my explanation.

(A)The diary of a writer of the Harlem Renaissance documenting the racial episodes in one of the writer’s novels. Not relevant. Doesn't say anything about contribution to the development of African-American voice.
(B) A survey of African American literature demonstrating Black writers’ ultimate rejection of European literary models. This is the correct answer. This says that Black writers rejected European literary models. So there's no way Cullen could have contributed to the development of the voice.
(C) The poems of a nineteenth-century Black poet who used the forms of eighteen-century English poetry. This strengthens the conclusion by saying that a Black poet took some sort of inspiration from English poetry.
(D) An essay by a Black poet insisting on this responsibility of Black writers to address the issue of race in their writing. It says that the poet is insisting that black writers should take up the issue. But it doesn't say anything against European writers. So doesn't weaken the conclusion.
(E) Folk tales from twentieth-century African American slave narratives of the nineteenth century. Not relevant
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Re: PLZ help me out of this question.   [#permalink] 20 Aug 2017, 23:49
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