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Manager
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Status: IF YOU CAN DREAM IT, YOU CAN DO IT
Joined: 03 Jul 2017
Posts: 192
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, International Business
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New post 07 Jul 2017, 02:05
I am unable to write the formulas and understand how to write the formula using the steps posted on "Rules on posting "
Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Joined: 28 Dec 2011
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New post 07 Jul 2017, 08:33
longhaul123 wrote:
I am unable to write the formulas and understand how to write the formula using the steps posted on "Rules on posting "

Dear longhaul123,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

GMAT Club uses La Tex, a general system for writing math symbols. You can find some of the syntax at this site, which actually tells you far more than you need.

Many of the basics are built-in buttons. Every other La Tex symbol or built-in symbol has to be contained in the math buttons (the "m" button).

Here are some basics. Ordinary math:
\(2 + 5 = 7\)
\(6 - 3 = 3\)

If we want to get fancy, we can use the multiplication & division signs.
\(7 \times 8 = 56\)
\(91 \div 7 = 13\)
There is no expectation that you will be this fancy.

Use the carot ^ (shift-6) for exponents.
\(2^8 = 256\)
For multiple digit exponent, surround the exponent in curly brackets {}
\(2^{10} = 1024\)

For fractions, type the fraction with a single slash sign, then highlight everything and press the "fraction" button, then highlight all this and press the math button.
\(\frac{a}{b}\)

Similarly for square roots. Highlight the expression, hit the "square root" button, then highlight it all and hit the math button.
\(\sqrt{361} = 19\)

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________
Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep


Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)
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Rules of posting   [#permalink] 07 Jul 2017, 08:33
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