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Schedule Question

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Schedule Question [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2017, 08:57
Hey Guys,

I'm following the 3-month beginner daily schedule - so far it seems ok - but I feel like for example I've read introductory sections on DS in the OG, Magoosh eBook, and watched the Magoosh videos online - I feel like this is a bit much just to get introduced to a topic - no?

Also the schedule mostly says watch the next 5 Math videos, next 5 Verbal videos - then do 16 problems in OG, then the next 16 the next - so on and so forth.
This seems almost completely random in a way - I know it's not meant to be focused - but I feel like I'm missing something here.

PS: I did pretty OK in the OG questions so far - but Magoosh questions I've only gotten half right - is this...normal? At least at the beginning?

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Re: Schedule Question [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2017, 14:18
EliMan wrote:
Hey Guys,

I'm following the 3-month beginner daily schedule - so far it seems ok - but I feel like for example I've read introductory sections on DS in the OG, Magoosh eBook, and watched the Magoosh videos online - I feel like this is a bit much just to get introduced to a topic - no?

Also the schedule mostly says watch the next 5 Math videos, next 5 Verbal videos - then do 16 problems in OG, then the next 16 the next - so on and so forth.
This seems almost completely random in a way - I know it's not meant to be focused - but I feel like I'm missing something here.

PS: I did pretty OK in the OG questions so far - but Magoosh questions I've only gotten half right - is this...normal? At least at the beginning?

Dear EliMan

This is Mike McGarry, author of the Magoosh study schedules and creator of many Magoosh videos. I'm happy to respond. :-)

First of all, for introductions to topics, feel free to adjust as needed. For some newbies, the entire realm of Data Sufficiency is wacky and weird, and these folks need multiple exposures to get used to this new question type. If you already are conversant in the basic logic of the DS, then skim or skip some of this introductory material. Throughout the schedule, trust yourself: if you feel you know something, don't sink a ton of time into it. Many of the Magoosh lessons have summaries at the end: one advantage of this is, when you think a lesson holds no surprises for you, you can just skip to the end and verify that you know everything in that lesson's summary.

The practice I recommend in the study schedule is random, and there's a method to this madness. You see, when you sit for the GMAT, you will get a random mix of problems, all topics at once, and I want folks to be prepared for this. You see, when folks do only subject-specific practice, one topic at a time, there is a BIG danger that folks will not develop the adequate level of understanding. See:
“Understanding” the GMAT: Practice vs. Exam Performance
GMAT Study Approaches: Systematic vs. Random

One result of this mixed practice from the outset is that students get a lot wrong at the beginning. That's perfectly normal and in fact it's by design. You see, we have designed things this way, not because we are mean and trying to punish student, but precisely the opposite: when a student gets a problem wrong and thinks deeply about the mistakes he has made, this will prepare him to understand more deeply the lessons he encounters later. If one is watching lessons with the memory have gotten something wrong, one is able to understanding more fully.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Magoosh Test Prep

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Schedule Question [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2017, 14:32
mikemcgarry wrote:
EliMan wrote:

One result of this mixed practice from the outset is that students get a lot wrong at the beginning. That's perfectly normal and in fact it's by design. You see, we have designed things this way, not because we are mean and trying to punish student, but precisely the opposite: when a student gets a problem wrong and thinks deeply about the mistakes he has made, this will prepare him to understand more deeply the lessons he encounters later. If one is watching lessons with the memory have gotten something wrong, one is able to understanding more fully.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


This part here:

Week Two, Day One
1) Watch Magoosh lesson videos
Math: the next six lesson videos

NOTE: After the Intro to Data Sufficiency module, some of the opening modules are very basic math. This plan is
designed for someone who needs to watch every single video. If you feel you know some of this basic concepts well
already, be your own judge: don’t force yourself to sit through a math lesson in which you know everything. You can
click ahead, and just check the summary at the end to make sure there was nothing you needed. If an entire
module looks basic to you, then you could just take the quiz at the end: if you ace the quiz, you probably don’t need
to sit through the module. You can always go back later and brush up on one thing you missed. Skipping some
videos will put you ahead in the schedule, and you will have more time to review video lessons at the end.

2) In Magoosh
Do 12 PS questions
Do 3 RC passage with all the associated questions



I think I'll be modifing the schedule a little bit right now due to the extreme randomness of questions vs topic order - I'm getting plenty wrong, but mostly due to yet to be reviewed/refreshed topics.

So instead of watching the videos in order now - and then doing questions (plent of which I get wrong or blank out at) - I'm choosing to do the Magoosh questions first - as best as I can - and if I was wrong or completly didn't know how to do said question - I watch all the 'Related Lessons' videos for that question - which I count towards my "Watch Magoosh lesson videos Math: the next six lesson videos" for the scheduled day.

Does this seem like an OK way to do it to you?

Also thank you for the response mikemcgarry !
I appreciate the reply thanks!

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Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Re: Schedule Question [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2017, 16:56
EliMan wrote:
This part here:

Week Two, Day One
1) Watch Magoosh lesson videos
Math: the next six lesson videos

NOTE: After the Intro to Data Sufficiency module, some of the opening modules are very basic math. This plan is
designed for someone who needs to watch every single video. If you feel you know some of this basic concepts well
already, be your own judge: don’t force yourself to sit through a math lesson in which you know everything. You can
click ahead, and just check the summary at the end to make sure there was nothing you needed. If an entire
module looks basic to you, then you could just take the quiz at the end: if you ace the quiz, you probably don’t need
to sit through the module. You can always go back later and brush up on one thing you missed. Skipping some
videos will put you ahead in the schedule, and you will have more time to review video lessons at the end.

2) In Magoosh
Do 12 PS questions
Do 3 RC passage with all the associated questions



I think I'll be modifing the schedule a little bit right now due to the extreme randomness of questions vs topic order - I'm getting plenty wrong, but mostly due to yet to be reviewed/refreshed topics.

So instead of watching the videos in order now - and then doing questions (plent of which I get wrong or blank out at) - I'm choosing to do the Magoosh questions first - as best as I can - and if I was wrong or completly didn't know how to do said question - I watch all the 'Related Lessons' videos for that question - which I count towards my "Watch Magoosh lesson videos Math: the next six lesson videos" for the scheduled day.

Does this seem like an OK way to do it to you?

Also thank you for the response mikemcgarry !
I appreciate the reply thanks!

Dear EliMan

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I don't really have much of a sense of what your level of understanding in math is or how experienced with the GMAT you are.

If math is a problem area for you, then I would ardently recommend watching the lessons in strict order. You see, the lessons are cumulative and concepts build in the sequence. Someone who is relatively strong in math can just jump into an isolated "related lesson" and get what he needs without having seen the previous sequence of lessons. This can be very confusing, though, for a student who has a great deal to learn, because any one lesson may draw on several different concepts treated in earlier lessons, and in the absence of all those concepts, the poor student will be confused and not even known what he is missing! :-(

Once you have watched all the lessons up to a certain module, it's fine to go back to a "related lesson" that you have already seen, because at that point you will probably get more out of the lesson on a second viewing, having just seen a question in which it was involved.

I will also say, it's fine to watch any "related lesson" as a preview, getting what you can out of it at the moment, but don't count that toward one of the videos you need to see in the study schedule. You need to work through the videos in strict order, so you see them cumulatively and get through the entire set. Any "preview" videos you want to watch would be over and above this sequence. As always, there's never any problem doing something that over and above--in fact, that's frequently the mark of an excellent student!

I know it can be frustrating to get all these questions wrong in the beginning. This is where, for your own benefit, you need to adopt a heroic attitude. Each question you get wrong is an opportunity to improve your understanding and you must embrace this opportunity with the heart of a lion. Instead of jumping ahead to related lessons for which you haven't been adequately prepared, think about keeping a rigorous error log. See:
Studying for the GMAT: Learning from Your Mistakes
If you can articulate, for each problem you get wrong, exactly what you do and don't understand, you will be in very good shape when you arrive at the lesson that answers these question.

My friend, few people achieve excellence largely because few have the heart for it. I urge you to embrace as many of the habits of excellence as you can.

Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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Kudos [?]: 7703 [0], given: 95

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Re: Schedule Question [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2017, 17:17
mikemcgarry wrote:
EliMan wrote:
This part here:

Week Two, Day One
1) Watch Magoosh lesson videos
Math: the next six lesson videos

NOTE: After the Intro to Data Sufficiency module, some of the opening modules are very basic math. This plan is
designed for someone who needs to watch every single video. If you feel you know some of this basic concepts well
already, be your own judge: don’t force yourself to sit through a math lesson in which you know everything. You can
click ahead, and just check the summary at the end to make sure there was nothing you needed. If an entire
module looks basic to you, then you could just take the quiz at the end: if you ace the quiz, you probably don’t need
to sit through the module. You can always go back later and brush up on one thing you missed. Skipping some
videos will put you ahead in the schedule, and you will have more time to review video lessons at the end.

2) In Magoosh
Do 12 PS questions
Do 3 RC passage with all the associated questions



I think I'll be modifing the schedule a little bit right now due to the extreme randomness of questions vs topic order - I'm getting plenty wrong, but mostly due to yet to be reviewed/refreshed topics.

So instead of watching the videos in order now - and then doing questions (plent of which I get wrong or blank out at) - I'm choosing to do the Magoosh questions first - as best as I can - and if I was wrong or completly didn't know how to do said question - I watch all the 'Related Lessons' videos for that question - which I count towards my "Watch Magoosh lesson videos Math: the next six lesson videos" for the scheduled day.

Does this seem like an OK way to do it to you?

Also thank you for the response mikemcgarry !
I appreciate the reply thanks!

Dear EliMan

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I don't really have much of a sense of what your level of understanding in math is or how experienced with the GMAT you are.

If math is a problem area for you, then I would ardently recommend watching the lessons in strict order. You see, the lessons are cumulative and concepts build in the sequence. Someone who is relatively strong in math can just jump into an isolated "related lesson" and get what he needs without having seen the previous sequence of lessons. This can be very confusing, though, for a student who has a great deal to learn, because any one lesson may draw on several different concepts treated in earlier lessons, and in the absence of all those concepts, the poor student will be confused and not even known what he is missing! :-(

Once you have watched all the lessons up to a certain module, it's fine to go back to a "related lesson" that you have already seen, because at that point you will probably get more out of the lesson on a second viewing, having just seen a question in which it was involved.

I will also say, it's fine to watch any "related lesson" as a preview, getting what you can out of it at the moment, but don't count that toward one of the videos you need to see in the study schedule. You need to work through the videos in strict order, so you see them cumulatively and get through the entire set. Any "preview" videos you want to watch would be over and above this sequence. As always, there's never any problem doing something that over and above--in fact, that's frequently the mark of an excellent student!

I know it can be frustrating to get all these questions wrong in the beginning. This is where, for your own benefit, you need to adopt a heroic attitude. Each question you get wrong is an opportunity to improve your understanding and you must embrace this opportunity with the heart of a lion. Instead of jumping ahead to related lessons for which you haven't been adequately prepared, think about keeping a rigorous error log. See:
Studying for the GMAT: Learning from Your Mistakes
If you can articulate, for each problem you get wrong, exactly what you do and don't understand, you will be in very good shape when you arrive at the lesson that answers these question.

My friend, few people achieve excellence largely because few have the heart for it. I urge you to embrace as many of the habits of excellence as you can.

Mike :-)


You know what - maybe I'm just taking the wrong problems way more to heart that I should be right now considering I'm only starting week 2....

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Schedule Question [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2017, 07:52
EliMan wrote:
mikemcgarry wrote:
EliMan wrote:
This part here:


My friend, I don't really have much of a sense of what your level of understanding in math is or how experienced with the GMAT you are.

If math is a problem area for you, then I would ardently recommend watching the lessons in strict order. You see, the lessons are cumulative and concepts build in the sequence. Someone who is relatively strong in math can just jump into an isolated "related lesson" and get what he needs without having seen the previous sequence of lessons. This can be very confusing, though, for a student who has a great deal to learn, because any one lesson may draw on several different concepts treated in earlier lessons, and in the absence of all those concepts, the poor student will be confused and not even known what he is missing! :-(


mikemcgarry The bolded section above - I don't want to sound like I'm trying to go against your overall advice but I (at least like to believe haha) have a strong background in Math because of my engineering background - of course I am still refreshing and reviewing everything because as a engineer (or even a engineering student) - not a lot of mental math is involved.

I justed wanted to ask that - now that you know my math background - that jumping to related lesson areas are still ok?

It appears you are saying it is - with, " Someone who is relatively strong in math can just jump into an isolated "related lesson" and get what he needs without having seen the previous sequence of lessons."

Thank you mike! Also your videos are excellent!

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Re: Schedule Question [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2017, 11:07
EliMan wrote:
This part here:

mikemcgarry wrote:
My friend, I don't really have much of a sense of what your level of understanding in math is or how experienced with the GMAT you are.

If math is a problem area for you, then I would ardently recommend watching the lessons in strict order. You see, the lessons are cumulative and concepts build in the sequence. Someone who is relatively strong in math can just jump into an isolated "related lesson" and get what he needs without having seen the previous sequence of lessons. This can be very confusing, though, for a student who has a great deal to learn, because any one lesson may draw on several different concepts treated in earlier lessons, and in the absence of all those concepts, the poor student will be confused and not even known what he is missing! :-(

mikemcgarry The bolded section above - I don't want to sound like I'm trying to go against your overall advice but I (at least like to believe haha) have a strong background in Math because of my engineering background - of course I am still refreshing and reviewing everything because as a engineer (or even a engineering student) - not a lot of mental math is involved.

I justed wanted to ask that - now that you know my math background - that jumping to related lesson areas are still ok?

It appears you are saying it is - with, " Someone who is relatively strong in math can just jump into an isolated "related lesson" and get what he needs without having seen the previous sequence of lessons."

Thank you mike! Also your videos are excellent!

Dear EliMan,

Thank you for clarifying your background, my friend. :-) I never like to assume that a student has a background that he doesn't have, but indeed it sounds as if most of the math tested on the GMAT Quant will be straightforward to you.

Yes, with the lessons, what I would recommend is go through the modules in order, but only taking quizzes. For Fractions & Decimals and for any module that you know you understand, just take the quiz. If you do well on the quiz, you are done with that module. Once you get to a module in which you think you may have doubts, watch the summaries of each lessons, and then only watch the lesson if there are ideas in the summary that you don't remember.

I think it also will be fine to watch related lessons out of context, because you will probably know most of the supporting mathematical information. I recommend some kind of methodical progression through the lessons in order, even if you are skimming along on quizzes and summary pages, just to make sure that there's not an area you will miss. Pay particular question to any "strategy" videos as you move through. By happenstance, you may do practice problems that don't touch a particular concept, and I wouldn't want you to miss that lessons.

The overall rule is: trust yourself. You're an intelligent person. The one person in the world who is an expert on what you need is you.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
_________________

Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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Re: Schedule Question   [#permalink] 10 Jan 2017, 11:07
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