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Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory

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Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 16 Feb 2019, 03:12
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A
B
C
D
E

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  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

42% (02:13) correct 58% (02:19) wrong based on 172 sessions

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Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory can be tested experimentally without taking for granted some other body of scientific beliefs, for we cannot interpret any experimental results without relying on such beliefs.

If this is true, then which of the following conclusions seems most likely?


A) Any particular scientific theory can be consistently retained, even in the face of apparently incompatible evidence, if we are willing to give up certain other scientific beliefs.

B) Experimental evidence is really irrelevant to scientific theorizing.

C) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the testing of scientific theories than to their initial formulation.

D) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the initial formulation of scientific theories than to their testing.

E) The best scientific theories are those which are formulated in such a way as to be subject to conclusive experimental refutation.

Originally posted by anuramm on 24 Jul 2004, 22:37.
Last edited by Bunuel on 16 Feb 2019, 03:12, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic, edited the question and added the OA.
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Re: Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2004, 21:06
sorry guys, the OA is A -

Choice A is the conclusion which follows most directly from the philosophical thesis. If an experimental result is in conflict with some theory or set of beliefs, by discarding those experimental observations, we can retain the theory. Choices B,C, D, are incorrect, because the passage does not address the issue of the relevance of experimentation. Choice E may be true, but does not follow from the argument presented in the passage.
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Re: Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Oct 2004, 17:54
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I'd go with A
Scientific theories depend on beliefs rather than experimentation. Hence, give up some beliefs and you will get the theories you want.
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Re: Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Oct 2004, 19:37
Agree with A. We can still retain the theory by not considering the experimental observations - IF the experiment has a conflict with some theory or set of beliefs.
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Re: Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2006, 12:45
first of all, ps_dahiya, that is pretty nasty...and wrong...ahhahaaa

from the passage, I am understanding it as scientific theory can not be tested without some other scientific belief (may be some foundation of science,..ie gravety, atoms...) and that we are not able to interpret them correctly if some of the foundations are not applied.

A. for me, A is restating the passage in a shorter way. Will hold on to it and see if there is something better.

B. irrelevant? passage states that they are relevant...

C and D are comparing "Experimental evidence, testing of scientific theory, and initial formulation"

E. Passage does not talk the "best," more like "no serious scientific theory "

Final answer A
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Re: Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2006, 20:02
I picked C :oops:

OA is A

dahiya, acfuture nice job!!! i really thought this one was tough especially with time constraint

OE:
Choice A is the conclusion which follows most directly from the philosophical thesis. If an experimental result is in conflict with some theory or set of beliefs, by discarding those experimental observations, we can retain the theory.
Choices B,C, D, are incorrect, because the passage does not address the issue of the relevance of experimentation.
Choice E may be true, but does not follow from the argument presented in the passage.
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Re: Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2008, 23:41
durgesh79 wrote:
Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory can be tested experimentally without taking for granted some other body of scientific beliefs, for we cannot interpret any experimental results without relying on such beliefs. If this is true, then which of the following conclusions seems most likely?

A) Any particular scientific theory can be consistently retained, even in the face of apparently incompatible evidence, if we are willing to give up certain other scientific beliefs.

B) Experimental evidence is really irrelevant to scientific theorizing.

C) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the testing of scientific theories than to their initial formulation.

D) Experimental evidence is more relevant to the initial formulation of scientific theories than to their testing.

E) The best scientific theories are those which are formulated in such a way as to be subject to conclusive experimental refutation.


Author is trying to prove: Relying on beliefs, scientist can test experimentally any theories. Without beliefs, there is no theory can be tested experimentally.

B,C,D are comparing experimental evidence, IRRELEVANT.
E say: The best theories: We dont care which theory is the best.

A says: We can retain a theory even there is evidence encountering it if we has belief (eliminate other beliefs).

A is best.
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Re: Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory  [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2011, 11:36
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skbjunior wrote:
Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory can be tested experimentally without taking for granted some other body of scientific beliefs for we can not interpret any experimental results without replying on such beliefs.

If this is true, then which of the following conclusions seems most likely?

A. Any particular scientific theory can be consistently retained, even in the face of apparently incompatible evidence, if we are willing to give up certain other scientific beliefs.
B. Experimental evidence is really irrelevant to scientific theorizing.
C. Experimental evidence is more relevant to the testing of scientific theories than to their initial formulations.
D. Experimental evidence is more relevant to the initial formulations of scientific theories than to their testing.
E. The best scientific theories are those which are formulated in such a way as to be subject to conclusive experimental refutation.

Please provide explanation for your answer choice. I will upload OA soon. Thank you!



According to me its A

author is saying that in order to prove some serious scientific theory one has to ignore or take granted the other body of scientific belief.

B,C,D tells us only about the experiment and thus irrelevant.
E tells us about the best theories thus irrelevant.

A says: a theory, which does not have enough evidences, can be retained, only if we give up some other beliefs.... thats exactly what stimulus tells us

Hence A is the answer
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Re: Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory  [#permalink]

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Re: Some philosophers of science claim that no serious scientific theory   [#permalink] 16 Feb 2019, 02:23
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