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Stable interest rates on long-term bonds are the financial

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Stable interest rates on long-term bonds are the financial  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Mar 2012, 22:37
3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  15% (low)

Question Stats:

77% (00:49) correct 23% (00:47) wrong based on 154 sessions

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Stable interest rates on long-term bonds are the financial market’s vote of confidence in the Federal Reserve keeping in control of inflation.

(A) in the Federal Reserve keeping in control of inflation

(B) that the Federal Reserve will keep inflation under control

(C) for the Federal Reserve, that it would keep control of inflation

(D) that inflation will be kept control of by the Federal Reserve

(E) that inflation would be kept control of by the Federal Reserve



What's wrong with E other than it is passive voice?
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Re: PT #11 SC 4  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2012, 05:04
The usual construction is
PAST + Conditional
or
PRESENT + Future

In our case Stable interest rates ....... are ...... vote of confidence that....... will ....

Few other examples I found in MGMAT SC

The Scientist BELIEVES that the machine WILL BE Wonderful. PRESENT +FUTURE
The Scientist BELIEVED that the machine WOULD BE wonderful. PAST+CONDITIONAL
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Re: PT #11 SC 4  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2012, 11:16
1
to keep something under control is the correct idiomatic use , so the answer is B.
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Re: PT #11 SC 4  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2012, 13:02
2
Remember that the GMAT is the authority on GMAT English, and that this is especially true with idioms. If you're not confident that a particular idiom issue has ever shown up on a real GMAT, don't sweat it. I haven't seen any other idiom questions involving "control," so I'll give an account of Standard Written English, which is sometimes more liberal than GMAT English.

About the idiom: "control of" is fine when followed by an object, the thing being controlled. It is awkward at best otherwise.
CORRECT: He seemed in control of the car until he hit the black ice.
CORRECT: It can be very difficult to take control of a privately held company.
AWKWARD: A privately held company can be very difficult to take control of.

If you add a prepositional phrase to the end of the clause, the awkward example passes over into just plain wrong.
CORRECT: It can be very difficult to take control of a privately held company by tender offer.
INCORRECT: A privately held company can be very difficult to take control of by tender offer.

In fact, apart from this idiom, you ought to be skeptical of any answer that follows "of" with another preposition.

About the odd use of the conditional in E: ENAFEX refers to chapter 7 of the Manhattan GMAT Sentence Correction Strategy Guide, specifically to pages 112 and 113. I won't try to capture all those pages have to say here, but I will note that you can often sort out verb tense issues by appealing to logic or meaning as much to grammar. The FR keeping control of the economy isn't conditional on anything, so don't use the conditional "would."
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Re: PT #11 SC 4  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Mar 2012, 17:35
B is the winner here.

E is very awkward and wordy.

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Re: Stable interest rates on long-term bonds are the financial  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2019, 09:27
MichaelS wrote:
Remember that the GMAT is the authority on GMAT English, and that this is especially true with idioms. If you're not confident that a particular idiom issue has ever shown up on a real GMAT, don't sweat it. I haven't seen any other idiom questions involving "control," so I'll give an account of Standard Written English, which is sometimes more liberal than GMAT English.

About the idiom: "control of" is fine when followed by an object, the thing being controlled. It is awkward at best otherwise.
CORRECT: He seemed in control of the car until he hit the black ice.
CORRECT: It can be very difficult to take control of a privately held company.
AWKWARD: A privately held company can be very difficult to take control of.

If you add a prepositional phrase to the end of the clause, the awkward example passes over into just plain wrong.
CORRECT: It can be very difficult to take control of a privately held company by tender offer.
INCORRECT: A privately held company can be very difficult to take control of by tender offer.

In fact, apart from this idiom, you ought to be skeptical of any answer that follows "of" with another preposition.

About the odd use of the conditional in E: ENAFEX refers to chapter 7 of the Manhattan GMAT Sentence Correction Strategy Guide, specifically to pages 112 and 113. I won't try to capture all those pages have to say here, but I will note that you can often sort out verb tense issues by appealing to logic or meaning as much to grammar. The FR keeping control of the economy isn't conditional on anything, so don't use the conditional "would."


Just adding my 2 cents here. D and E has another problem, it is missing the preposition "in" - keep in control or keep under control is the proper idiom...
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Re: Stable interest rates on long-term bonds are the financial &nbs [#permalink] 13 Jan 2019, 09:27
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