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Suffering from depression and frightened

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Suffering from depression and frightened  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2017, 10:12
1
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A
B
C
D
E

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  15% (low)

Question Stats:

81% (01:14) correct 19% (01:45) wrong based on 129 sessions

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Suffering from depression and frightened by the extent of it, author William Styron’s despair turned into a harrowing yet illuminating novel about the disease.

A) Suffering from depression and frightened by the extent of it, author William Styron’s despair turned into a harrowing yet illuminating novel about the disease.
B) Suffering from depression and frightened by the extent of the depression, author Williams Styron’s despair was turned into a harrowing yet illuminating account of the disease.
C) Suffering from depression and frightened by the extent of it, author William Styron turned his despair into a harrowing yet illuminating account of the disease.
D) Author William Styron turned his despair into a harrowing yet illuminating account of the disease, depression, from which he suffered and whose extent frightened him.
E) Author William Styron’s despair was turned into a harrowing yet illuminating account of depression, a disease from which he suffered and was frightened by.
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Re: Suffering from depression and frightened  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2017, 10:50
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If a sentence reads like this: "Suffering from depression..., X did something" then "X" is the person or thing "suffering from depression". The original sentence says that "William Styron's despair" was suffering from depression, which doesn't make sense - it was Styron himself, not his "despair", who was suffering from depression. Answer C fixes that issue.

Answers D and E use a passive construction ("was turned into") which is bad in this sentence (and in most sentences) because it's not clear who performed the action. Answer C is better, because it's clear that it was Styron himself who turned his despair into a 'harrowing account', while in, say, E, we have no way to know if it was Styron or someone else, say a friend of his, who did that.
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Re: Suffering from depression and frightened  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2017, 10:56
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A) Suffering from depression and frightened by the extent of it, author William Styron’s despair turned into a harrowing yet illuminating novel about the disease.
Author's despair cannot turn into something. This doesn't make sense.
B) Suffering from depression and frightened by the extent of the depression, author Williams Styron’s despair was turned into a harrowing yet illuminating account of the disease.
Repeats the error in the original sentence
C) Suffering from depression and frightened by the extent of it, author William Styron turned his despair into a harrowing yet illuminating account of the disease.
This is the correct choice. Meaning error of sentence corrected
D) Author William Styron turned his despair into a harrowing yet illuminating account of the disease, depression, from which he suffered and whose extent frightened him.
Passive construction. The correct idiom is from X to Y
E) Author William Styron’s despair was turned into a harrowing yet illuminating account of depression, a disease from which he suffered and was frightened by
This sentence has passive construction
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Suffering from depression and frightened  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2017, 10:58
IanStewart

Thanks for your replying.
I was confused between option C and D.
I have learned it hard way that we should not remove options just because its passive. Is there any other reason for D to be wrong?

In option C because the first 2 phrases are modifier and i thought were completely independent, "IT"should be replaced by word DEPRESSION . So I marked D. ( but i was clearly wrong). Please help
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Re: Suffering from depression and frightened  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2017, 11:42
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Sorry, I made a mistake - glancing quickly I just assumed D and E had the same structure because they begin the same way. Only E uses a passive construction; D is active. But D has a few problems. When it says "the disease", that would normally refer back to the ailment mentioned earlier. This sentence makes perfect grammatical sense:

Author William Styron turned his despair into a harrowing yet illuminating account of the disease.

Here "the disease" refers back to "his despair", but that's not the intended meaning of the complete sentence - the disease in the sentence is 'depression'. So D starts having problems when it starts tacking things on at the end of the above, because it's not clear what the disease is supposed to be.

And when there is an obvious way to change an SC answer choice that would improve it dramatically, you're almost never looking at a correct answer. If you take the middle of answer D and change it so the sentence begins:

Author William Styron turned his despair into a harrowing yet illuminating account of depression, a disease from which he suffered

that immediately makes it a clearer sentence, which is a good reason to look for a different answer choice. The end of the sentence is also awkward, which is why I've left it out.
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Re: Suffering from depression and frightened   [#permalink] 08 Jul 2017, 11:42
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