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The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is

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The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Oct 2013, 11:01
1
5
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  15% (low)

Question Stats:

77% (00:47) correct 23% (00:51) wrong based on 293 sessions

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The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is actually nonexistent, a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects relative to the rotation of the Earth’s surface.

A. a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects relative to the rotation

B. a phenomenon where moving objects are deflecting relative to the rotation

C. a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects and is relative to the rotation

D. is a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects relative to the rotation

E. is a phenomenon where moving objects are deflected relative to the rotation
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Re: The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Oct 2013, 16:02
2
avohden wrote:
The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is actually nonexistent, a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects relative to the rotation of the Earth’s surface.

A. a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects relative to the rotation
B. a phenomenon where moving objects are deflecting relative to the rotation
C. a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects and is relative to the rotation
D. is a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects relative to the rotation
E. is a phenomenon where moving objects are deflected relative to the rotation

Dear avohden,
Another quality question from Veritas. I'm happy to help. :-)

Split #1: we need a verb. Some of these choices commit the famous "missing verb mistake." See:
http://gmat.magoosh.com/lessons/914-the ... rb-mistake
The main subject, "the Coriolis effect" needs a main verb. The prompt lacks one. Only choices (D) & (E) insert the verb "is", thereby giving the whole sentence a main verb. One of those two has to be correct.

Split #2: "that" vs. "where". On the GMAT, "where" can only be used for physical locations (".. the city where ...", "...the country where ...", " ... the building where ...") The GMAT would not tolerate using "where" to modify the word "phenomenon". Therefore, choices (B) & (E) cannot be correct.

Those two splits are enough to isolate (D), the OA. Does all this make sense?

Mike :-)
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Re: The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 03 Nov 2013, 10:42
As always, succinct and methodical from Mike!

Originally posted by Kconfused on 02 Nov 2013, 13:19.
Last edited by Kconfused on 03 Nov 2013, 10:42, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Nov 2013, 15:13
avohden wrote:
The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is actually nonexistent, a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects relative to the rotation of the Earth’s surface.

A. a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects relative to the rotation

B. a phenomenon where moving objects are deflecting relative to the rotation

C. a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects and is relative to the rotation

D. is a phenomenon that seems to deflect moving objects relative to the rotation

E. is a phenomenon where moving objects are deflected relative to the rotation
*

hihi I found it in 17 seconds :)

Really easy, this is sub 600 level questions!

==> Coriolis effect IS a phenomenon... eliminate A B C
In E, where it totally out of logic and not link with a physical place!

Answer D !

Hope it helps!
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Re: The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Nov 2013, 10:35
Official Explanation

Correct answer: (D)
- Look for the Sentence Construction error here. The original version lacks a main verb. The happens because a modifier is incorrectly used where a verb-subject complement structure is called for. “A phenomenon” without a verb performs the work of an appositive modifier, but it makes no sense to modify “nonexistent.”

“X is Y,” however, has the subject-verb-subject complement structure that avoids the modifier error and restores a main verb to the sentence. Using Slash and Burn enables us to see that the main clause should read “The Coriolis effect is a phenomenon.” Accordingly, eliminate (A), (B), and (C). Answer (E) generates a passive construction (“are deflected”) and incorrectly uses the relative pronoun “where” to refer to “a phenomenon,” not a location that can be logically described as “where.”

Only answer (D) maintains the active construction (“seems to deflect”), uses an appropriate relative pronoun (“that”), and includes a main verb (“is”).
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Re: The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2017, 09:35
What would have been correct in this same question if I were given the options :
a) phenomenon that....
b) phenomenon which...

That or which?

Posted from my mobile device
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Re: The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2018, 21:53
prateekkapoor24 wrote:
What would have been correct in this same question if I were given the options :
a) phenomenon that....
b) phenomenon which...

That or which?

Posted from my mobile device


A defining relative clause can start with either. When you use which, you do not use commas when writing defining relative clauses. "that" clauses are always defining clauses.

For more on this, check the post I wrote for Veritas Prep: https://www.veritasprep.com/blog/2013/1 ... at-debate/
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Re: The Coriolis effect, the apparent result of a force that is &nbs [#permalink] 25 Jul 2018, 21:53
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