It is currently 20 Sep 2017, 13:36

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

1 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 21 Oct 2013
Posts: 443

Kudos [?]: 1727 [1], given: 289

The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Jan 2014, 15:10
1
This post received
KUDOS
12
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  35% (medium)

Question Stats:

58% (00:48) correct 42% (00:58) wrong based on 346 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not in a single moment of revelation but evolved independently in several ancient cultures, including India, Babylonia, and the Maya Empire.

born not in a single moment of revelation but
born not in a single moment of revelation but was
not born in a single moment of revelation but
not born in a single moment of revelation but it
not born in a single moment of revelation but had

OE
[Reveal] Spoiler:
A quick scan of the answer choices reveals two basic alternatives—"was born not" and "was not born." We eliminate (A) and (B) because "was born not" is not parallel to but evolved. The two verbs are being balanced by not and but. (B) also uses the passive "was evolved" which is an incorrect use of the word "evolve".

(D) unnecessarily adds the word "it." This could only be correct if the form of the sentence were ". . . was not born in a sudden moment of revelation; rather, it evolved slowly . . ." Since that is not the form used here, the word "it" is not needed.

(E) incorrectly uses the past perfect tense "had evolved" because the past perfect is only necessary to compare a sequence of events in which one event precedes another event in the past. Here, there is no sequence of time—the whole sentence is in the same past time.

(C) uses the proper "was not born" parallel to "but evolved" and the proper simple past, active form "evolved".


Hi, I thought parallel structure means if one of the verb is passive, another one must be passive.
Can anyone explain this for me, please.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Kudos [?]: 1727 [1], given: 289

1 KUDOS received
Retired Moderator
User avatar
P
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4272

Kudos [?]: 7587 [1], given: 360

Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Jan 2014, 00:54
1
This post received
KUDOS
When it comes to the question of weighing parallelism, correlative conjunction parallelism rides over voice parallelism;
_________________

“Better than a thousand days of diligent study is one day with a great teacher” – a Japanese proverb.
9884544509

Kudos [?]: 7587 [1], given: 360

1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 22 Jul 2011
Posts: 32

Kudos [?]: 24 [1], given: 4

R: K
Re: The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Jan 2014, 12:07
1
This post received
KUDOS
goodyear2013 wrote:
The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not in a single moment of revelation but evolved independently in several ancient cultures, including India, Babylonia, and the Maya Empire.

born not in a single moment of revelation but
born not in a single moment of revelation but was
not born in a single moment of revelation but
not born in a single moment of revelation but it
not born in a single moment of revelation but had

OE
[Reveal] Spoiler:
A quick scan of the answer choices reveals two basic alternatives—"was born not" and "was not born." We eliminate (A) and (B) because "was born not" is not parallel to but evolved. The two verbs are being balanced by not and but. (B) also uses the passive "was evolved" which is an incorrect use of the word "evolve".

(D) unnecessarily adds the word "it." This could only be correct if the form of the sentence were ". . . was not born in a sudden moment of revelation; rather, it evolved slowly . . ." Since that is not the form used here, the word "it" is not needed.

(E) incorrectly uses the past perfect tense "had evolved" because the past perfect is only necessary to compare a sequence of events in which one event precedes another event in the past. Here, there is no sequence of time—the whole sentence is in the same past time.

(C) uses the proper "was not born" parallel to "but evolved" and the proper simple past, active form "evolved".


Hi, I thought parallel structure means if one of the verb is passive, another one must be passive.
Can anyone explain this for me, please.



Hi

An active voice entity CAN very well be parallel to a passive voice as long as the subject of the verbs is same....

Also some structures of possible imperfect lists:

1. Noun forms and “ing” noun forms (gerund).
2. Active and passive voice entities
3. Verb-ed and Verb-ing modifiers

For details please refer article by E-Gmat Experts at parallelism-imperfect-list-142791.html

Kudos [?]: 24 [1], given: 4

GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10167

Kudos [?]: 253 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Jun 2015, 06:52
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.

Kudos [?]: 253 [0], given: 0

Math Forum Moderator
User avatar
S
Status: QA & VA Forum Moderator
Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 2991

Kudos [?]: 1049 [0], given: 325

Location: India
GPA: 3.5
WE: Business Development (Commercial Banking)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Jun 2015, 07:42
3
This post was
BOOKMARKED
goodyear2013 wrote:
The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not in a single moment of revelation but evolved independently in several ancient cultures, including India, Babylonia, and the Maya Empire.


Correct idiomatic expression is - Not X but Y ( Parallel Markers)

From the given options (A) and (B) can straigtaway be rejected

born not in a single moment of revelation but
born not in a single moment of revelation but was

Options which looks close

not born in a single moment of revelation but verb+ed = Looks correct

not born in a single moment of revelation but it - It has no clear (Unambiguous antecedent)
not born in a single moment of revelation but had - Had used incorrectly, hence rejected.

Hence IMHO (C) looks the best.
_________________

Thanks and Regards

Abhishek....

PLEASE FOLLOW THE RULES FOR POSTING IN QA AND VA FORUM AND USE SEARCH FUNCTION BEFORE POSTING NEW QUESTIONS

How to use Search Function in GMAT Club | Rules for Posting in QA forum | Writing Mathematical Formulas |Rules for Posting in VA forum | Request Expert's Reply ( VA Forum Only )

Kudos [?]: 1049 [0], given: 325

GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10167

Kudos [?]: 253 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 Aug 2017, 09:47
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.

Kudos [?]: 253 [0], given: 0

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 10 Aug 2017
Posts: 15

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 88

Re: The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Sep 2017, 09:46
I was debating between option C and E.. and went with E, thinking that 'had' was properly placed.

Looks like I was wrong in thinking that it was a proper use of past perfect 'had.' Why is it incorrect? Is it because of parallelism?

'was not born..' is a simple past, so it should be 'but evolved', which is also a simple past?

thx in advance!

Kudos [?]: 2 [0], given: 88

Re: The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not   [#permalink] 05 Sep 2017, 09:46
    Similar topics Author Replies Last post
Similar
Topics:
1 Parallelism : Confusion in concept lafs26 1 29 Jun 2013, 03:50
3 Freud's original conception of psychoanalysis was of a mattce 5 23 Jul 2015, 07:25
7 EXPERTS_POSTS_IN_THIS_TOPIC Ranked among great mathematical scientists such as tejal777 12 20 Jun 2016, 01:24
2 EXPERTS_POSTS_IN_THIS_TOPIC Born in Portsmouth, England, Charles Dickens StoicBread 9 02 May 2017, 15:24
17 In addition to mathematical achievements in areas such as gladiator999 15 14 Jul 2016, 12:57
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The mathematical concept of "zero" was born not

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.