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Beyond the MBA Classroom: Good Ole Darden Days [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2016, 07:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: Beyond the MBA Classroom: Good Ole Darden Days
When you select an MBA program, you are not just choosing your learning environment but are also committing to becoming part of a community. Each Thursday, we offer a window into life “beyond the MBA classroom” at a top business school.Image

Typically held in the spring, Darden Days is a weekend of organized presentations and events both on campus and throughout Charlottesville for the school’s admitted students. The intensive weekend is meant to provide these candidates with an in-depth perspective on all aspects of Darden’s MBA program and community and with the basic information they will need if they decide to accept the school’s offer of admission. One second-year student we interviewed called Darden Days one of his “favorite events of the year” and described how for one event, prospective students, first years, and second years enjoyed a barbecue at a local vineyard with a bluegrass band, where they could all “hang out outside, mingle, and ask questions.”

For in-depth descriptions of social and community activities at UVA Darden and 15 other top MBA programs, check out the mbaMission Insider’s Guides.

The post Beyond the MBA Classroom: Good Ole Darden Days appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Jen Kedrowski
mbaMission

Website: http://www.mbamission.com
Blog: http://www.mbamission.com/blog
mbaMission Insiders Guides: http://www.mbamission.com/guides.php?category=insiders
Free Consultation: http://www.mbamission.com/consult.php

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Diamonds in the Rough: Ivy League Experience for a Public School Price [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2016, 11:00
FROM mbaMission Blog: Diamonds in the Rough: Ivy League Experience for a Public School Price at Rutgers
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Rutgers Business School

MBA applicants can get carried away with rankings. In this series, we profile amazing programs at business schools that are typically ranked outside the top 15.

Benefiting from the prestige of its parent university, the eighth oldest university in the United States, Rutgers Business School (RBS) offers a suite of flexible curricular options and formal concentrations that are rooted in its multidisciplinary strength. In the past, the school has marketed its program as the “same education as an Ivy League School, at a fraction of the price”—a claim that seems substantiated by robust industry connections across several disciplines, a network of more than 33,000 alumni, and a high employment rate (98.3% of its Class of 2015 MBAs were employed 90 days after graduation, even more than the 93.5% seen for the Class of 2014). In 2015, U.S. News & World Report named Rutgers the best public MBA program in the New York City area, and in 2016, it ranked the school 53rd among all MBA programs in the country.

For those aspiring to work on Wall Street, the school offers a Master of Quantitative Finance degree that earned RBS a place among the “Top 10 Quant Schools in 2012,” as ranked by Advanced Trading.

The post Diamonds in the Rough: Ivy League Experience for a Public School Price at Rutgers appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Jen Kedrowski
mbaMission

Website: http://www.mbamission.com
Blog: http://www.mbamission.com/blog
mbaMission Insiders Guides: http://www.mbamission.com/guides.php?category=insiders
Free Consultation: http://www.mbamission.com/consult.php

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Friday Factoid: More Than Marketing at Kellogg [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2016, 08:00
FROM mbaMission Blog: Friday Factoid: More Than Marketing at Kellogg
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As we all know, Kellogg is just a marketing school, right? Not quite so. A quick glance at the school’s most recent employment report (click on the “FUNCTION – FULL TIME” tab) reveals that 35% of its Class of 2015 accepted jobs in consulting, and only 20% went into marketing/sales, its second most popular functional area. McKinsey & Company, Boston Consulting Group, Bain & Company, Deloitte, and Accenture were among the school’s hirers in 2015.

Kellogg MBAs credit the “Management Lab”—wherein first-year students work on a consulting project and are mentored by consultants from leading firms (before their summer internships)—with preparing them for success in their internships and full-time positions. Meanwhile, a variety of other hands-on experiences are also available, including the “Global Lab” (students work with an international firm), “Advanced Topics in Marketing” (students analyze a marketing issue and present it to management), and “Leading Mission Driven Enterprises” (students offer management expertise to nonprofits). Not to worry, though—if you are interested in marketing, Kellogg still has ample resources for you.

For more information on other defining characteristics of the MBA program at Kellogg or one of 15 other top business schools, please check out the mbaMission Insider’s Guides.

The post Friday Factoid: More Than Marketing at Kellogg appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Jen Kedrowski
mbaMission

Website: http://www.mbamission.com
Blog: http://www.mbamission.com/blog
mbaMission Insiders Guides: http://www.mbamission.com/guides.php?category=insiders
Free Consultation: http://www.mbamission.com/consult.php

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mbaMission’s Exclusive Interview with Soojin Kwon, Director of Admissi [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2016, 12:00
FROM mbaMission Blog: mbaMission’s Exclusive Interview with Soojin Kwon, Director of Admissions at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business
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Soojin Kwon, Director of Admissions at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business

We had the opportunity to catch up with Soojin Kwon, the director of admissions at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, to get her take on some recent developments at the school and explore various elements of the Ross admissions process. Soojin kindly shared her thoughts on a number of topics, including the following:

  • the reasons behind several of the changes to Ross’s essay questions this year
  • how admissions works with career services in the evaluation process
  • how admissions views a campus visit, or lack thereof—especially for certain candidates
  • what she feels are important characteristics for a Ross student to have
  • what waitlisted applicants should be sure to tell the admissions committee
  • where candidates tend to be weakest in their applications
mbaMission: I’m glad we’re getting this chance to catch up. It’s been a long time.

Soojin Kwon: It really has! And this is a really exciting time at Ross. We’ve got a new dean; we’ve got a new building that’s about to open up this fall. I’m headed to New York to do an event with Steve Ross and the dean. A lot is happening. We’re building on some really good momentum here.

mbaMission: That’s great. How long have you been in this position now? It’s been a while, right?

SK: Almost 12 years! I love this job. I meet a lot of interesting people and recruit them to come to a school I love and went to myself. Then I get to reconnect with them on the road as alumni who help us recruit more great students. It’s an awesome community to be part of.

mbaMission: I’m sure. I know people who already have their MBAs who say, “Oh, if were to apply to business school now, I would never get in.” The perception is that things are constantly getting harder and more competitive. And I do feel like every year, the applicants get a little better. Do you get that impression, too?

SK: I do feel that way. Some of it comes from candidates having access to more information about schools from the schools themselves as well as from media outlets and advisors—and from schools “getting out there” more, both in person and virtually. And many schools, like us, have strived to be more transparent. So that makes it easier for applicants to understand what it takes to put their best foot forward in the application process.

mbaMission: That is true. But I want to return to one of the exciting developments at Ross that you mentioned earlier—Scott DeRue taking over as the school’s dean just over a month ago. What effect do you feel his leadership might have on Ross’s MBA program?

SK: We’re really excited to have Scott as our dean. He’s no stranger to the school; he’s been here nine years and has served in a number of leadership roles, most recently as the associate dean for executive education and director of our Sanger Leadership Center. Because he knows the school well, he’s been able to hit the ground running. He has a lot of energy, and he’s extremely dedicated to the school. It’s only been a month, and he has logged a lot of miles to engage with alumni, meet prospective students, and chat with the media. Closer to home, his schedule’s been packed, too, talking with faculty and staff, welcoming our new MBA students, and even doing a live Facebook Q&A session.

He’s identified a few ideas, or goals, if you will. One is to make Ross the world’s leading business school for experience-driven learning. Another is to make Ross a home for ideas that influence the world of business. And the third is to make lifelong learning possible by giving Ross alumni access to tuition-free executive education for life.

mbaMission: That’s really good to hear. So in regard to Ross’s written application, in recent years, you have asked candidates to share their proudest moment in their professional and personal lives, but this year, the question addresses only applicants’ personal life. What was the motivation for this change?

SK: We found that most applicants tended to write about a professional achievement. And it was often something that was already mentioned in their resume, their recommendation letter, and sometimes their interviews. We were basically getting the same story two or three times. We didn’t have a space to get to know them more personally before we interviewed them, so we wanted to steer people more toward the personal side of things and be explicit about focusing on a personal accomplishment. We wanted to get a better sense of them as a person.

mbaMission: A lot of applicants seem to think there is no room to talk about their personal life in a business school application, but clearly, there is.

SK: Absolutely there is.

mbaMission: You want to get to know people as people.

SK: Yes. We’re not just trying to bring in smart, accomplished professionals. We’re also building a community of students who will work together, hopefully motivate and support and inspire each other and expand each other’s vision of possibilities, and share their unique skills and talents with their classmates. To get a sense of that side of a candidate, we need to know more than just their professional accomplishments. Business school isn’t just about academics and finding a great job. It’s also about joining a school’s community and working with folks in that community. The fit piece is really important.

mbaMission: Definitely. The word count for Ross’s career-goals essay was reduced this year from 400 words last year to just 250. Was there a particular reason for this change, too?

SK: By making it shorter, we’re hoping students can be more focused in their vision and their response—something along the lines of “Here’s my plan. Here’s why I’m interested in this path.” They can think of it as a short answer question with two parts.

mbaMission: Got it. How often would you say you confer with the career services office to make sure candidates’ goals are really plausible?

SK: We do an annual review with career services on students’ employment outcomes. We call it “Stars and Strugglers.” We ask career services to identify students in each category so the admissions team can review those students’ applications to see what, if any, “signs” there might’ve been about their potential success in the career search process. What we’ve found is that it’s less about a student’s prior career than it is about how they prepare for their desired new career that shapes their outcomes.

mbaMission: That makes sense. With the recent trend among MBA programs in asking fewer essay questions and reducing word limits, we’re seeing candidates who are increasingly focused on the optional essay and concerned that not submitting one could be detrimental in some way. What advice would you give applicants about whether to submit an optional essay and how doing so—or not—might affect someone’s candidacy?

SK: For the Ross application, the optional essay is less of an “optional essay” and more of a place to briefly explain anything within the application that might require more context. For example, maybe someone has a gap in their employment history, which we would see in the resume, or they didn’t have their current direct supervisor write their rec letter. The optional essay is a place to explain those things. It’s not a place to explain why they love Ross or to copy and paste an essay they wrote for another school because they think it sheds more light on who they are. Or to say, and this is something we often see, “I’m a really bad standardized test taker” or “I was immature in college and partied too much, and hence my grades were bad.” It’s not a space for that.

One of the things I keep contemplating is doing away with essays altogether, but I think that might freak applicants out rather than providing them less work. They might think, “But the essay’s the only place where I can differentiate myself” or, “If I write an amazing essay, that’ll offset my low test score.” Not true. The bottom line is that I’d caution applicants against spending an inordinate amount of time on their essays at the expense of investing time in the parts of the application that have greater weight—demonstrated academic ability and professional achievements.

mbaMission: Sure. I saw where you recently wrote a blog post encouraging applicants to attend more student recruiting events, and you offered some great reasons for doing so. But how does going to one of those events compare with a school visit in the admissions committee’s eyes? If a candidate attends a Ross recruiting event, would you like to see that person also come to campus for a visit?

SK: There’s no better way for an applicant to get a sense of a school and whether it would be a good fit than visiting its campus, sitting in on a class, watching how the discussion goes, walking the halls and seeing how students engage with each other, or exploring the town. Meeting us and our alumni at one of our events can be a substitute, but obviously, only a partial one. From an evaluation perspective, though, it doesn’t change how we make our decision. If a candidate is great, we’re going to admit them whether they come to an event or not.

mbaMission: If an applicant doesn’t live all that far away from Ross but doesn’t ever visit the school, would that lead you to think that maybe he or she could have put in more of an effort?

SK: Yes, when someone lives fairly close, but they don’t interview on campus or come to visit, we do wonder why. It doesn’t happen often. Candidates take advantage of every opportunity to put their best foot forward. We’ve seen that in the increase in campus visits and in the applicants who opt to interview on campus.

mbaMission: What kind of person would you say tends to do well at Ross? In other words, what characteristics tend to position students for success in this program?

SK: A few characteristics come to mind. People who thrive on doing things and not just taking things in and absorbing them do well at Ross. It’s a place for do-ers. Both the academic experience and extracurricular activities are based on the premise that students will learn best by actually doing things. We provide lots of opportunities to gain hands-on experience in just about anything an MBA grad could want to do—advising, managing, starting or investing in a business or impact organization. Students who do well here are those who take advantage of opportunities.

Another characteristic of students who tend to do well in the program is being team oriented. Everything students do here is with other students Whether it’s class assignments, semester-long projects, or club activities, it requires working well with others. So we’re looking for people who know how to work with others and value doing so. It requires having an open mind and respecting others.

mbaMission: I see. You’ve said that in the Ross interview, candidates will often—if not always—be asked to explain why they feel Ross is the right program for them. So what are some ways applicants can clearly show that they really understand what Ross has to offer and are a good “fit” with the school?

SK: It will show by what they write about in their essays, what their recommender says about them, and, for those who are invited to interview, what they say in their interview. Candidates can get a good sense of who we are by talking to our students, alumni, and staff.

mbaMission: Okay. Can you provide some insight into why an applicant might end up on the Ross waitlist and what waitlisted candidates should or should not do while the school makes its final decision?

SK: One reason could be that one part of a person’s application isn’t as strong as the rest of it, compared with the rest of the pool. The two main areas are generally academics—in other words, their test score and/or undergrad record—and work experience. The test is really the only thing an applicant can change within an admissions cycle.

One thing waitlisted applicants should do is to let us know whether they’re still interested in coming to Ross. We email applicants to confirm their interest, and we touch base with them throughout the process to share where we are and ask them if anything’s changed.

mbaMission: Got it. What would you say to potential applicants who are hesitant to apply to Ross because they don’t believe they have a “good enough” story or their stats do not quite measure up to the school’s published averages?

SK: They should apply. An average is just that—an average—not a requirement or a minimum. Even the lower end of the 80th percentile, which is what most schools publish, is not the “minimum.” We admit applicants on both sides of the average. There’s a reason there are multiple components to the application; we review applicants holistically. No one is just a score and a GPA.

mbaMission: Sure. What is a part of the application process that you feel candidates do not tend to spend enough time on or address thoroughly enough? What would you say is most often the weakest area?

SK: The resume. That’s our first snapshot of who an applicant is, and what many will do is just submit the last resume they wrote. It’s full of jargon for their industry; it looks like they’re applying for a job in their industry. The resume should be something that someone who doesn’t work in their industry can understand. Applicants can do that by focusing on impact and results.

The one thing that we see frequently—and that applicants shouldn’t do—is make it read like a job description. We want to know what an applicant accomplished, not what they were hired to do.

mbaMission: How would you recommend that applicants deal with their recommenders? Do you think applicants should engage with them, maybe refresh their memory about certain events or accomplishments, or take more of a hands-off approach?

SK: Ross requires only one rec letter. We decided to require—and accept—only one because we found that a second letter rarely gave us different insight into a candidate. As far as how an applicant should deal with their recommenders, it’s helpful to the recommender to refresh their memory about what you worked on with them, what you contributed or accomplished, how you performed, and to check in with them to make sure they meet the application deadline.

mbaMission: Right. Before we wrap up, is there anything else you want people to know about Ross’s MBA program?

SK: It’s one of the top three schools in the U.S. News [& World Report] rankings of specializations, with bench strength across all academic areas, not just one or two areas. This is important because MBAs aren’t going to spend their entire career in one industry. They’re going to change careers one, two, three, or more times. Ross will prepare them to move across industries and functions.

They’ll also have classmates and alumni who go into a wide range of careers, so the network will be very diverse. In fact, one of the phrases we frequently use here is “Go Blue, Go Anywhere,” because Michigan Ross grads can be found around the globe, across a wide array of industries and functions. The majority go to the coasts: New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Los Angeles, Boston, DC, and Chicago. And with more than 90% of our students coming from outside of Michigan, students don’t come in with preestablished relationships or a singular focus on getting a job in the area. As a result, they tend to develop strong bonds. And Ann Arbor is a really easy place to get to, unlike some schools that aren’t in a big city. We’re just 30 minutes from an international airport and Delta hub. So it makes it easy for students to travel—for recruiting, for courses that have a global component, or to go on an adventure with classmates.

Another thing is that a lot of schools have gotten on the bandwagon of experience-driven learning. What we do is more comprehensive and intensive than anything else out there. MAP, which stands for Multidisciplinary Action Project, is seven weeks, full-time. That’s a quarter of your first year, almost as long as a summer internship. That’s particularly helpful for students who want to change careers. The roster of project sponsors is pretty amazing, too—organizations like Amazon, Google, Facebook, the World Bank, the New York Jets, Celebrity Cruises, Hyatt Hotels, NBC, Clinique, Habitat for Humanity, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, start-ups in Europe, NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] in Africa. It’s a pretty cool list. Candidates who are comparing programs and thinking every school’s got experience-driven learning or field-based learning should know that they’re not all created equal.

mbaMission: This has been really great. Thank you so much for your time!

SK: No problem. Thank you!

The post mbaMission’s Exclusive Interview with Soojin Kwon, Director of Admissions at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Jen Kedrowski
mbaMission

Website: http://www.mbamission.com
Blog: http://www.mbamission.com/blog
mbaMission Insiders Guides: http://www.mbamission.com/guides.php?category=insiders
Free Consultation: http://www.mbamission.com/consult.php

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MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: But the Guy Beside Me Is Applying! [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2016, 07:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: But the Guy Beside Me Is Applying!
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You look around your office and think to yourself: “I wish my coworker were not applying to the same school as I am. They can’t take two people who sit at the same desk. Also, his GPA is 0.15 higher!” On the surface, this reasoning may seem logical, and it can thus cause anxiety for some candidates—especially for those who are in positions for which an MBA is virtually a “must have” to move forward, such as in consulting and banking.

However—not to worry—this thinking has two significant flaws:

  • You are not the same candidate as the person at the desk beside you. He/she may have similar work experience, but you have had different interactions with team members and clients and have worked on different projects. So, you have different perspectives on your experiences and so do your recommenders. Furthermore, your work experience is only one piece of the puzzle that is your application. Even if your coworker does have a slightly higher GPA or GMAT score, you are still quite different in terms of your personal/life experiences, community/leadership activities, ability to perform during interviews, and more. Instead of worrying that the admissions committee will make an apples-to-apples comparison and cast you out, you must focus on what makes you distinct and present your best self.

[*]The top schools have room for two great candidates. When we asked Harvard Business School’s (HBS’s) former director of whether she would accept two candidates who had worked at the same company, she quipped, “We have room for Larry and Sergei (referencing the two founders of Google).” An mbaMission consultant recalled that when she was at HBS, she had two classmates who worked on the same desk at the same private equity firm. At HBS, they ended up in the same section. Top MBA programs do not have quotas for certain firms, towns, ethnicities, etc. They just want the best candidates out there.[/list]

So, in short, as you eye that individual across the desk, try to avoid simplified comparisons. Focus on that which makes you distinct, and expect that the admissions committees will not fulfill quotas, but rather identify talent.

The post MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: But the Guy Beside Me Is Applying! appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Jen Kedrowski
mbaMission

Website: http://www.mbamission.com
Blog: http://www.mbamission.com/blog
mbaMission Insiders Guides: http://www.mbamission.com/guides.php?category=insiders
Free Consultation: http://www.mbamission.com/consult.php

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GMAT Impact: I Studied This—I Should Know How to Do It! [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2016, 08:00
FROM mbaMission Blog: GMAT Impact: I Studied This—I Should Know How to Do It!
With regard to the GMAT, raw intellectual horsepower helps, but it is not everything. In this blog series, Manhattan Prep’s Stacey Koprince teaches you how to perform at your best on test day by using some common sense.

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When was the last time you thought, “I studied this! I should know how to do it!”? For me, it was sometime within the past week. I knew that this problem was not beyond my reach! Meanwhile, the clock was ticking away, and all I could focus on was the fact that I could not remember something that I should have been able to remember.

That horrible, sinking feeling is universal: we have all felt it before and—unfortunately—we are all going to feel it again. How can we deal with this?

What does the “But!” feeling really mean?

When you catch yourself thinking

  • But I studied this…
  • But I should know how to do this…
  • If I just had a little more time, I am sure I could figure it out…
  • I have already invested so much time—I do not want to give up now…
… all these really mean is I do not actually know how to do the problem right now. If I did, I would not feel any of the “But!” feelings. I would just do the problem.

Our brains are not perfect. Sometimes we are going to forget or stumble over something that we really do know. (Also, sometimes we are going to think we should know something that we really do not know as well as we thought we did.)

Change your response

We are never going to get rid of the “But!” feeling, so the remedy here is not to try to train ourselves to lose it. Rather, the remedy is to recognize that we are feeling this way and change how we respond.

When you feel the “But!” feeling, start treating the problem like one that you know you do not know how to do. Do not give into the feeling; it is trying to distract you and cause you to waste time. From now on, “But… but… but…” = I do not know what I am doing.

If I have already used up all my time, I guess randomly and move on. If I still have some time left, and I have some ideas about how I might make an educated guess, then I try to do that for about 30 seconds or so. Then, I pick and move on.

Next steps

Still struggling with the idea of cutting yourself off like this? Read my mind-set article, In It To Win It, to understand why letting go on a few problems here and there is not really a big deal. Here is another resource for time management. (We all have at least minor problems with time management on a test like the GMAT.)

The post GMAT Impact: I Studied This—I Should Know How to Do It! appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

Jen Kedrowski
mbaMission

Website: http://www.mbamission.com
Blog: http://www.mbamission.com/blog
mbaMission Insiders Guides: http://www.mbamission.com/guides.php?category=insiders
Free Consultation: http://www.mbamission.com/consult.php

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Monday Morning Essay Tip: Set the Tone in Your Opening Lines [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2016, 08:00
FROM mbaMission Blog: Monday Morning Essay Tip: Set the Tone in Your Opening Lines
As any good journalist will tell you, the key to writing a good newspaper story or opinion piece is to make sure the very first line grabs the reader’s attention. Many authors employ this tactic when writing books. Perhaps few of us have actually read Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, but many know that the novel begins with three famous words: “Call me Ishmael.” A powerful first line can stick with readers long after they have finished reading—and sometimes even when they have not read something firsthand. For example, we all likely recognize the phrase “It was a dark and stormy night,” but few of us may know that it is the opening line of a book by an obscure writer (Paul Clifford by Edward George Bulwer-Lytton).

Although beginning an essay with a very short introduction is the norm, sometimes a punchy opening line can grab the reader’s attention in a useful way. Consider the differences between these pairs of openers. Which line in each example better captures your attention?

Example 1: A “Why MBA?” essay

A: “After I graduate with my MBA, I want to work in the wine industry.”

B: “Blood runs in the veins of all humans, but wine also runs in mine.”

Example 2: A “What are you most passionate about in life?” essay

A: “I enjoy nothing more than playing ice hockey.”

B: “As soon as the nearby river freezes, I wake at 6 a.m. each day and join my teammates for a prework hockey scrimmage.”

No set formula exists for opening lines—the possibilities are endless, and each opener depends on the context of the story being told. Nonetheless, our point is that you must carefully consider your opening line, because it will set the tone for your essay and determine whether your reader will want to read more.

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Mission Admission: Details Matter, But… [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2016, 08:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: Mission Admission: Details Matter, But…
Mission Admission is a series of MBA admission tips; a new one is posted each Tuesday.

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As MBA admissions consultants, we know firsthand the intense pressure business school candidates feel, and we sometimes wish we could convince you that small points are really just that—small points. We get asked, “Should this be a comma or a semicolon?” and want to respond, “Please trust us that the admissions committee will not say, ‘Oh, I would have accepted this applicant if she had used a comma here, but she chose a semicolon, so DING!’” That said, we are certainly not telling you to ignore the small things. Details matter—the overall impression your application makes will depend in part on your attention to typos, font consistency, and grammar, for example—but we encourage you to make smart and reasonable decisions and move on. You can be confident that your judgment on such topics will likely be sufficient.

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Professor Profiles: Baba Shiv, Stanford Graduate School of Business [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2016, 08:00
FROM mbaMission Blog: Professor Profiles: Baba Shiv, Stanford Graduate School of Business
Many MBA applicants feel that they are purchasing a brand when they choose a business school. However, the educational experience you will have is what is crucial to your future, and no one will affect your education more than your professors. Each Wednesday, we profile a standout professor as identified by students. Today, we focus on Baba Shiv from the Stanford Graduate School of Business (GSB).

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“Baba Shiv is a legend,” said a first-year GSB student with whom we spoke. Baba Shiv, who also teaches within the executive MBA program, received his MBA from the Indian Institute of Management and his PhD from Duke University before joining the Stanford GSB faculty in 2005. Shiv’s research concentration is in the area of neuroeconomics, and he focuses his studies on the systems of the brain that lead individuals to like and want things and how those systems shape people’s decisions. His work explores self-control and why people make certain choices, even when logic tells them that those choices may not be in their best interest.

A GSB alumni magazine article once described Shiv as “a favorite uncle who is always interested in your life and eager to talk about new, exciting ideas,” and Dan Ariely, a colleague of Shiv’s and a professor at Duke Fuqua, noted in the same article, “Shiv’s mere presence makes everything around him seem better.” A second year and Marketing Club officer told mbaMission that Shiv “tries to be a career resource for people who want to pursue marketing careers” and is “engaging and exciting to listen to. He is one of the favorite members of the whole faculty; people love him.”

For more information about the Stanford GSB and 15 other top-ranked business schools, check out the mbaMission Insider’s Guides.

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mbaMission Consultant Spotlight: Nisha Trivedi [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2016, 11:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: mbaMission Consultant Spotlight: Nisha Trivedi
At mbaMission, our consultants are more than just graduates of the world’s top MBA programs—we are also expert communicators who possess an unparalleled knowledge of the admissions process. Each week, we highlight one member of our team who has committed his/her professional life to helping you get into business school.

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Nisha Trivedi earned her BA in communication from the University of Pennsylvania and her MBA from the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. A deep interest in understanding the consumer inspired her to initially pursue a career in marketing research, and after college, she held positions at Time Inc., Rosetta, and KPMG LLP in New York City. A desire to transition into brand management led Nisha to Ross, where she was an active member of the Marketing Club, organizing mock internship interviews for her peers during her first year and serving as the club’s vice-president of communications during her second year. After graduating with her MBA, Nisha worked for several years in brand management in San Francisco at Big Heart Pet Brands (now part of The J.M. Smucker Company) before joining mbaMission. She most enjoys creating brand positioning and crafting tailored messaging that speaks to consumers’ needs, which is a skill she applies in helping her clients “market” themselves to their dream MBA programs. Nisha also has a longstanding commitment to philanthropy—she has been a volunteer team leader for New York Cares and now sits on the board of directors of The Shanti Project, a San Francisco–based nonprofit that enhances the health, quality of life, and well-being of people with serious illnesses.

Quick Facts:
Received MBA from: Michigan Ross

Undergraduate field of study: Communication

Fields worked in before mbaMission: Marketing Research, Brand Management

Working style: Collaborative and focused, but with moments of lightness.

Five things you want your clients to know about you:

  • My background in marketing is beneficial in two ways: (1) It gives me the ability to deeply understand my audience and tell an engaging story, (2) Though I truly enjoy working with clients of all backgrounds and aspirations, I especially love working with clients in marketing (or who hope to transition to marketing) since I deeply understand their skills and motivations.
  • As I have worked in several different industries (publishing, consulting, financial services, consumer packaged goods), I’m familiar with a variety of company cultures.
  • I have an absolute passion for hearing clients’ personal stories and helping them figure out how best to share the most meaningful ones in their applications.
  • Many applicants love to travel and volunteer. I’ve done a fair amount of both (and also have lived in several US regions), so I can assist with effectively communicating the essences of these experiences to the AdCom to show how they’ve led to personal and professional growth.
  • My favorite quotation is “The most important thing I have learned over the years is the difference between taking one’s work seriously and taking one’s self seriously. The first is imperative, and the second disastrous.” (Margot Fonteyn) While the application process can be arduous, I also think it’s best approached with a healthy sense of balance and humor.
Testimonials:
“Nisha was very helpful. Nisha had read all of my information ahead of time, which was very helpful and made us able to dive right in. I also felt like she was interested and really tried to connect with my experience and goals/aspirations.” —B-school applicant

“I’m highly grateful for your help. I think I was able to pick up a lot from our conversation and from your analysis.” —B-school applicant

Want a free consultation with Nisha? Sign up here.

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Beyond the MBA Classroom: TG at Kellogg [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2016, 07:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: Beyond the MBA Classroom: TG at Kellogg
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Kellogg’s Atrium

When you select an MBA program, you are not just choosing your learning environment but are also committing to becoming part of a community. Each Thursday, we offer a window into life “beyond the MBA classroom” at a top business school.

TG is an abbreviation of the longer abbreviation TGIF (aka “Thank God It’s Friday”) and is the name of a popular weekly social event at Kellogg, hosted by various student clubs throughout the year. Held in the school’s atrium, TG is an opportunity for students to wind down the week with beers and appetizers and to interact with professors and members of Kellogg administration in an informal atmosphere. The event attracts primarily first-year students, but second years are known to occasionally make an appearance as well.

For in-depth descriptions of social and community activities at Kellogg and 15 other top MBA programs, check out the mbaMission Insider’s Guides.

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Diamonds in the Rough: Rotman School of Management [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2016, 11:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: Diamonds in the Rough: Rotman School of Management
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The University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

MBA applicants can get carried away with rankings. In this series, we profile amazing programs at business schools that are typically ranked outside the top 15.

One of Canada’s top-ranked business schools for finance—the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management—benefits from the leadership of a foremost figure in the nation’s financial sector. After Roger Martin stepped down as the school’s dean, Tiff Macklem, the former senior deputy governor of the Bank of Canada, assumed the role in 2014 for a five-year term.

Rotman, ranked first among Canadian MBA programs by the Financial Times, underwent significant growth under Martin’s deanship, in both campus size and endowment. Macklem’s appointment as dean suggests a continued rise in Rotman’s academic profile and its reputation for financial education. “He has vast experience managing large institutions, translating academic research into public policy, and representing Canada on the world stage,” stated the university’s vice president and provost.

In addition to its finance-related strengths, Rotman offers a rather unique approach to core business pedagogy. Relying on what it terms “integrative thinking,” Rotman’s teaching model challenges the compartmentalization of traditional functional areas. Students complete a series of core courses in their first year that emphasize generalized business skills and the ability to think across functional disciplines. In their second year, they are given the option to choose from among 15 different major areas, while supplementing their focus with a broader array of elective courses.

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Friday Factoid: Career Assessment at HBS [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2016, 08:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: Friday Factoid: Career Assessment at HBS
With today’s new MBAs facing a mixed job market, Harvard Business School (HBS) has put together an arsenal of resources to help students in their job search. Students begin by completing an online self-assessment before they even arrive on campus. The CareerLeader tool, developed by two members of the HBS faculty, helps incoming students identify their life interests, professional skills, and “work/reward” values. When they arrive on campus, first-year students then participate in a class that helps them interpret their CareerLeader results while discussing cases on the careers of HBS alumni. Later in the semester, but before official recruiting begins, students can attend Industry Weeks, which are on-campus programs and panels that provide overviews of a variety of industries and address how to plan a successful industry-specific job search. These are taught by career coaches, alumni, Career Services staff members, and company representatives.

First years can also join Career Teams, which are small groups of first-year students who use exercises—facilitated by trained second-year leaders—to help identify and advance their professional goals. Students may also arrange to meet with a career coach for one-on-one guidance or take advantage of one of the many student clubs that help prepare their members for interviews. Clearly, HBS is committed to helping its students not just find jobs, but find the “right” jobs.

For more information on other defining characteristics of the MBA program at HBS or one of 15 other top business schools, please check out the mbaMission Insider’s Guides. If you are applying to HBS, our free HBS Interview Primer can help you put your best foot forward.

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International Students Seeking Post-MBA Roles in the United States: A  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2016, 10:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: International Students Seeking Post-MBA Roles in the United States: A Checklist for Success
In this new blog series, “MBA Career News,” our mbaMission Career Coaches offer invaluable advice and industry-related news to help you actively manage your career. Topics include building your network, learning from mistakes and setbacks, perfecting your written communication, and mastering even the toughest interviews. To schedule a free half-hour consultation with one of our mbaMission Career Coaches,click here.

Concerned international business school students often ask us a myriad of questions about how best to fulfill their career aspirations in the United States. What challenges will they face in constructing their job applications? What can they do now to simplify the process? In this blog post, mbaMission Career Coach Elissa Harris identifies some of the major challenges international students often face when seeking post-MBA roles in the United States and offers her insightful Checklist for Success as a tool for understanding—and in some cases, addressing—those challenges.

Challenges for International Students
 

Core Issue

 

Challenge for International Students

 

English-language communication skills
• Writing compelling (and grammatically correct) resumes, cover letters, networking emails, and thank you notes

• Convincing potential employers that they are able to communicate (verbally and in written form) with team members, coworkers, vendors, and/or clients

• Performing at the required level during interviews (e.g., quickly processing information, thinking on their feet)

Knowledge of U.S. customs and norms
• Building vital relationships with recruiters and alumni

• Understanding what is—and is not—appropriate to discuss during networking conversations

• Lacking knowledge of common “small talk” topics (e.g., sports)

• Inadvertently demonstrating a lack of interest or inappropriate interest through mannerisms or style

Knowledge of U.S. industries and/or U.S. consumers

 
• Being unfamiliar with the differences between industry challenges and trends in the United States and those in other countries and thereby appearing uninterested in or unqualified for the target role

Establishing a network in the United States (particularly for industries where recruiting is very networking driven [e.g., private equity, technology, media and entertainment] or on-campus recruiting is minimal/rare)
• Identifying contacts at target firms

• Tendency to build friendships primarily or only with other international students on campus, thereby hindering the development of an effective network

Experience in the United States
• Effectively communicating a willingness (or desire) to live in a specific city, despite having never visited that city or established connections there

• Focusing on working only in big cities (e.g., New York City, San Francisco)

Visa issues/Understanding the requirements to work in United States
• Facing limited recruiting opportunities because some companies will not sponsor international students (though traditionally, bigger companies and industries [e.g., investment banking, consulting] are the most open to sponsorship)

 

Checklist for Success
International students with the following qualities and experiences tend to be most successful at obtaining post-MBA positions in the United States. A strong international candidate

  • has spent significant time in the United States, either in college or at work
  • demonstrates comfort with networking
  • possesses strong interpersonal skills and an ability to form relationships
  • has pre-MBA experience with multinational companies; has worked with global teams and conducted business in English
  • grew up in an English-speaking non-U.S. country
  • has family members already residing in the United States
  • understands challenges but also demonstrate self-awareness and an eagerness to learn/be successful
  • has researched career options and is interested in industries that tend to hire international students
  • expresses realistic career goals (e.g., not looking to change industry, function, and location all at the same time)
  • is knowledgeable about the H-1B visa process
Have you been admitted to business school and want to get a head start on defining your career goals? Do you need help preparing for job interviews or learning how to effectively network with your target employers? Or maybe you want to be a top performer in your current role but are unsure how to maximize your potential. Let an mbaMission Career Coach help via a free 30-minute consultation!

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mbaMission’s Exclusive Interview with Kurt Ahlm, Associate Dean for St [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2016, 12:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: mbaMission’s Exclusive Interview with Kurt Ahlm, Associate Dean for Student Recruitment and Admissions at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business
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Kurt Ahlm, Associate Dean for Student Recruitment and Admissions at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business

Recently, we were able to catch up with Kurt Ahlm, the associate dean for student recruitment and admissions at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, who brought us up to speed on some of the exciting happenings at the school and certain changes that were made this year to its application essay prompts. In addition, he touched on a number of other topics, including the following:

  • The increase in the number of women in the program
  • What admissions wants to know about applicants’ intended career path
  • The qualities of a successful Chicago Booth student
  • Why students and alumni are used to conduct admissions interviews
  • The benefits of the school’s flexible curriculum
mbaMission: Thank you so much for this opportunity to chat. When the photo-inspired essay first appeared in Booth’s application last year, you said that one of the motivations for this approach was to elicit more genuine and even “visceral” reactions from applicants. We have to assume that you saw at least some of what you had hoped for, given that you are using the same approach this year. What kind of information or insight do you feel this prompt generates that the other parts of the application do not?

Kurt Alhm: The visuals really anchor on the individuality of each applicant, how they connect with a specific moment, and why they want to be part of the Booth community. We want to get a better feel for the unique connection and impact they can bring to Booth, as well as Booth’s impact on their life and future aspirations. We’ve been really impressed and have seen applicants take a very personal approach with their chosen image, as well as give profound reasons for wanting to be a part of this school and how they want to define their impact going forward. We were pleasantly surprised to see that image selection results last year were as diverse as our applicants, and we hope to find the same is true this year.

mbaMission: We noted that the number of photos from which candidates could choose dropped from 16 last year to ten, different photos were offered, captions were included, and the associated prompt changed focus a bit. Can you explain some of the reasoning behind these changes? How do you hope these adjustments might influence the essays you receive in response?

KA: We continue to select photos that represent various moments of the Booth experience. From the classroom setting to annual competitions to excursions in locations around the world, each moment is distinctive to Chicago Booth and indicative of the culture that connects every student, faculty member, and alumnus of this school. What’s more, everyone reflects on moments differently, and at Booth, we value diverse perspectives, because it is important to have varied opinions threaded throughout the learning process, as it makes ideas stronger. We hope that, as it did last year, the essay encourages applicants to express themselves, their individuality, and their passions in an authentic way, as well as how they connect to the Booth community and culture. The captions that we included this year provide additional context for applicants to relate to each moment and find connections that resonate best with them.

mbaMission: Sure. When we last spoke with you, Dean [Sunil] Kumar had been in place for only a few months. How would you characterize his influence on the school during his tenure since then?

KA: Knowing that Sunil is moving on, it is a fitting time for reflection on his tenure here at Chicago Booth. Along with his leadership in recruiting exceptional professors from around the world, Dean Kumar has been an advocate and front-runner in the expansion of Booth’s global presence—most recently, the move of our executive MBA program in Asia from Singapore to its new home in Hong Kong. The school has seen many new initiatives under his charge in regards to students, alumni, and faculty, from innovative education and research programs to increased support for scholarships and collaborative partnerships.

mbaMission: That’s great. What do you feel have been some of the most important changes at Booth in the past few years?

KA: Over the past several years, we have made strides across the board, including broadening and strengthening our intellectual and global footprint and recruiting and expanding faculty with expertise in diverse areas.  We’ve increased support for students and research through the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, as well as the Social Enterprise Initiative and the Harry L. Davis Center for Leadership.

mbaMission: Nice. The percentage of women in Chicago Booth’s incoming class has been rising in recent years. What steps has the school taken to help increase female interest and enrollment in the MBA program?

KA: Following the overall trend for MBA programs, we are seeing an increased number of women at top-tier business schools in the past several years. Booth’s educational approach and values have always caught the attention of a widely diverse set of MBA seekers. As we’ve learned to better convey who we are through stories of our students and alumni making an impact in industries across the board, we appeal to an even broader scope of candidates. Chicago Booth is more than a finance school—it’s marketing, social impact, entrepreneurship, technology, CPG [consumer packaged goods], consulting. That type of variety naturally attracts people with differing interests, career goals, and passions. We’re not doing anything different per se, just doing a better job of articulating what the Booth degree and this community are all about. And that resonates with many, including women.

mbaMission: Right. If an applicant is deciding between two logical career paths, would Booth prefer that the candidate discuss both options in the application or commit to just one?

KA: We ask candidates to tell us their goals to help us understand what motivates them to get an MBA and what they are driven to do in the future, but also to explain why they believe Booth is the best place to pursue that passion. As an applicant, we expect you to have well-thought-out conviction in your goals and to be able to clearly explain what those intentions are, as well as how you plan to achieve them within the construct of Chicago Booth. Regardless of industry, career aspirations backed by authentic passion that truly mean something to the candidate will come through in their application, and that is sure to catch our attention.

mbaMission: Got it. Has the school been doing anything in particular to strengthen its alumni network?

KA: With over 50,000 alumni around the world, annual events such as Reconnect and Booth 20/20 provide opportunities for alumni to reunite and reflect, while milestone events such as the celebration of our 20-year presence in Europe and 15-year presence in Asia showcase the strength of the Booth community around the globe. Alumni also connect with each other and the school through recruitment efforts, panel discussions, industry conferences, alumni clubs, executive-in-residence programs, and other engagements both on and off campus.

mbaMission: Absolutely. What characteristics would you say tend to set someone up for success at Chicago Booth? In other words, what kinds of students tend to thrive in your program?

KA: A successful student is one who has a solid understanding of why they want an MBA, why now, and why Booth. Students at Booth share an intellectual curiosity and passion for ideas. They are humble leaders who want to be part of something bigger than what a single individual can achieve. The backgrounds from which our students come and they areas they are going into post-MBA are incredibly diverse, and they [the students] embrace an environment that cultivates such diversity. Our students believe that the best ideas generate the greatest impact when different perspectives have been solicited and thoroughly vetted. Together, we build a collaborative community with respect for each other’s individual viewpoint—bringing together students and faculty from various industries and cultures to realize the potential for breakthrough moments every day.

mbaMission: Great. How can applicants convey to the admissions committee that they truly understand what Chicago Booth is about and why the school is right for them, and vice-versa? What are some ways that someone can demonstrate “fit”?

KA: Successful applicants are able to showcase their career trajectory, who they are, and what they are passionate about in an authentic way that relates both to their own aspirations and to how they plan to interact within the Booth community. Candidates should be able to give examples and a wider understanding of why they want an MBA, why it’s important at this point in their life, and why Booth is the place they want to be. Don’t be afraid to be specific and pull from encounters, conversations, and experiences you have already had with current students, alumni, faculty, staff, and other members of the Booth community.

mbaMission: Got it. What is most important for a reapplicant to demonstrate?

KA: It is important for reapplicants to show us how they have made an effort to continue growing and challenging themselves in the time since they last applied—especially in areas that they feel are their weaknesses. So we like to see things like taking additional courses, leadership development or promotion in their current job, and other opportunities to build on existing skill sets.

mbaMission: Sure. What guidance would you give someone who finds him- or herself on the waitlist? Why might admissions put an applicant on the waitlist in the first place?

KA: It is important to understand that we put a lot of time and resources into how to help and guide applicants through the waitlist process. Our approach is to be as transparent and supportive as possible, providing open communication and counsel while also emphasizing how you can take initiative during this critical period. The number of applicants placed on the waitlist varies from year to year and from deadline to deadline. We admit a number of applicants from the waitlist each year, and you should realize that being put on the waitlist signals a genuine interest in having you join us at Chicago Booth. All waitlisted applicants are reviewed as part of our ongoing evaluation efforts. We recommend doing your own thorough and thoughtful audit of your original application and think about ways in which you can add value and context for the admissions committee.

mbaMission: What would you say is the value in using second-year students and alumni for interviews rather than members of the admissions staff?

KA: Whether current students, alumni, or staff members, we approach interviews as a dialogue between two very interested parties who genuinely want to get to know each other. Interviews serve as much for us to evaluate candidates as for candidates to learn more about whether our program is a fit for them. We hope applicants take this as an opportunity to ask candid questions and to dig deep to find out if ours is a school and a community they want to be a part of—not only for the next two years but for the rest of their life. Second-year students and alumni provide a valuable judgement of fit for the program because they have been through it themselves. They can offer candidates significant insight into what it’s like to be at Booth, as well as provide a discerning assessment of how they think candidates would contribute to Booth’s learning environment. Also, these applicants are the people who will be their future classmates, colleagues, and leaders in their fields.

mbaMission: Definitely. What do you feel the flexibility of Booth’s curriculum offers students that a more rigid or required curriculum does not? How or why do you think it is better for preparing students for their post-MBA career?

KA: Our flexibility is rooted in the culture at Booth, which appreciates individuality. We believe you know yourself best, so we give you the academic freedom to explore classes that best suit your goals, that challenge you, allow you build on your existing skill set, take risks, and make you think differently. Our Academic Advisors help students craft a curriculum based on their particular academic and professional background, providing guidance and support during the entire two years. No matter your unique path, the program works to ground you in an understanding of the fundamentals and to give you a versatile “business tool kit” that will apply to whatever you aspire to do going forward. This enables our students to feel comfortable in any situation and develop a range of skills across multiple industries. Students are prepared to enter their chosen careers, but more importantly, they have the agility to change directions later on and be successful wherever they go for an entire lifetime.

mbaMission: Great. Thank you so much for your time!

KA:  Thank you for the opportunity.

The post mbaMission’s Exclusive Interview with Kurt Ahlm, Associate Dean for Student Recruitment and Admissions at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
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MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: Reapplicants Should Not Reapply [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2016, 07:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: Reapplicants Should Not Reapply
You applied to business schools once and did not get in. It took a lot of effort and caused a lot of heartache. Now what do you do? You cannot really apply again to those schools, can you? What is the point? They already rejected you once, so they will do the same thing next time, right? Wrong.

MBA admissions committees are governed by self-interest. Simply put, the schools want the best candidates out there. If you are among the best candidates, why would any admissions director think, “Well, this is an outstanding candidate who can add something special to our school and has unique potential going forward, but he applied last year so we’ll just forget about him.” Indeed, the reapplication process is not a practical joke or a disingenuous olive branch to those permanently on the outside. If the schools were not willing to admit a reapplicant, they would not waste their time and resources reviewing the applications.

While many fret about being reapplicants, some admissions officers actually see a reapplication as a positive—a new opportunity. Michigan Ross’s director of admissions, Soojin Kwon, told mbaMission, “They are certainly not ‘damaged goods.’ We have had many successful reapplicants join our program after they’ve spent a year strengthening their candidacies.”

J.J. Cutler, former director of admissions at Wharton, echoed this sentiment: “We find that students who have applied to Wharton before are absolutely not at a disadvantage. In fact, we recognize that the application process is an extensive one that involves self-examination and a large time commitment. […] Reapplying can give an applicant a chance to benefit from all the self-reflection and goal setting [he or she] went through during [his or her] first application cycle.”

Meanwhile, the Yale School of Management’s assistant dean and director of admissions, Bruce DelMonico, noted, “I can certainly bust that myth. Our admit rate for reapplicants is actually the same as it is for first-time applicants. It’s important, though, for reapplicants to explain to us how their candidacy has improved from the previous time they applied. Reapplicants need to make sure they enhance their application, rather than just resubmitting the same application.”

So—in short—reapplicants, you have no reason to believe that you only have one chance. Like any competitive MBA applicant, continue to strive and achieve; if it does not work out this time, it just might happen next time.

The post MBA Admissions Myths Destroyed: Reapplicants Should Not Reapply appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
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Blog: http://www.mbamission.com/blog
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GMAT Impact: Avoiding Getting Multiple Questions Wrong in a Row [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2016, 07:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: GMAT Impact: Avoiding Getting Multiple Questions Wrong in a Row
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With regard to the GMAT, raw intellectual horsepower helps, but it is not everything. In this blog series, Manhattan Prep’s Stacey Koprince teaches you how to perform at your best on test day by using some common sense.

“How do I make sure I don’t get more than two, three, or four questions wrong in a row?”

Students ask this all the time—they have heard that GMAT scoring penalizes us for getting a lot of questions wrong in a row.

This is true, to some extent. The GMAT test writers prioritize steady performance over the length of the entire test, so they have built safeguards into the algorithm to ensure that if, for example, we spend too much time early on, we will get penalized for running out of time at the end.

So… How do I avoid getting multiple questions wrong in a row?

People will say something like, “I am pretty sure I got the last two wrong—I just outright guessed on the last one. Now, how do I make sure I get the next one right?”

You cannot. You can never “make sure” that you get any particular question right. If you could…well, then you would not need any help, right? Nobody on the planet, not even the best test takers, can guarantee that they are going to answer any particular question correctly.

So what do I do when I know I have just gotten a couple of questions wrong?

You are going to hate my answer: You ignore it. You do not even think about it in the first place.

You likely hate that answer because you feel that you have no control—and you are right. We cannot control this at all. That is why we should not waste a single second thinking about it. Try the question in front of you for some reasonable amount of time. If you just cannot do it in the expected time frame, find a way to make a guess and move on.

Spending more time (more than the rough average) does not actually increase the chances that you will get something right!

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But then, how do I get better?


Expect that you are not going to be able to answer everything.

Know how to make an educated guess wherever possible.

Acknowledge when a problem just is not going your way and, when needed, make a random guess without wasting a single second longer.

Change your response to the thought, “I have to get this one right.” Have you already read this article: But I studied this – I should know how to do it? If so, then you will remember that we talk about changing your response to the “but!” feeling. (If not, go read the article right now.)

The same thing applies here. When you find yourself thinking, “Oh, I need to get this one right!,” change your reaction. Instead of spending extra time and stressing yourself out, tell yourself, “I cannot guarantee anything. If I can do this one in regular time, great. If not, I will guess without losing time on it and move on.”

The post GMAT Impact: Avoiding Getting Multiple Questions Wrong in a Row appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Blog: http://www.mbamission.com/blog
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GMAT Impact: Lifting Your GMAT Score [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2016, 22:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: GMAT Impact: Lifting Your GMAT Score
With regard to the GMAT, raw intellectual horsepower helps, but it is not everything. In this blog series Manhattan Prep’s Stacey Koprince teaches you how to perform at your best on test day by using some common sense.

How do you maximize your score on the GMAT? Sure, you have to learn to answer harder questions correctly—but that is not actually enough.

Let us stipulate a couple of things. First, whenever I say “easier” or “harder” in this post, I am referring to easier or harder for you, the reader; everything here is relative to your current scoring level and your desire to lift that level to whatever your goal score is. In other words, this works at every level and for every goal.

Second, as a general rule, you take (on average) more time to answer harder questions than you take to answer easier ones.

Okay, so what does that mean? Most people do not spend much time studying the things that they generally already know how to do; they do not analyze questions that they answered correctly unless there was some other issue (such as spending too much time).

That is a mistake—and not just because we can still learn things from questions that we answer correctly. More importantly, if you want to lift your score, then the questions that you find of medium difficulty today need to turn into questions that you find easier in the future.

Think about how the test works: if you are scoring in the 80th percentile, then 65th percentile questions are generally fairly easy for you, the 75th to 85th range is medium, and 90th percentile questions are too hard. If you want to lift your score to 90th percentile, sure, you have to learn how to tackle those harder questions. At the same time, the 75th to 80th percentile questions have to become your “easier” question pool—“medium” level will no longer be good enough!

Remember when I said that we generally take more time to answer the harder questions? That is okay, within reason (say, up to 30 seconds beyond the average for that question type). To have that extra time, though, you have got to be saving time on the easier questions. Those questions that are medium for you right now—you have actually got to be able to do them more quickly for them to turn into easier questions in the future.

Beyond all of that, there is yet another benefit. Shortcuts or alternate solution methods that you figure out for those easier and medium questions can often be used on harder questions as well. You will actually learn how to tackle some of the harder stuff by getting even better at the easier and medium stuff.

If you are going for a really high score (720+), then I will leave you with a couple of “challenge” exercises. Answer this math question and this Critical Reasoning question in one minute (or less). Good luck!

The post GMAT Impact: Lifting Your GMAT Score appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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mbaMission

Website: http://www.mbamission.com
Blog: http://www.mbamission.com/blog
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Monday Morning Essay Tip: Lead or Led? [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2016, 07:00
FROM mbaMission Blog: Monday Morning Essay Tip: Lead or Led?
A very common mistake we see in mbaMission client essays is the misuse of the verb “lead.” A deeply entrenched and widespread misunderstanding seems to exist as to which spelling connotes present tense versus past tense. One of our consultants even had a client raise his voice to her in passionate defense—of the wrong usage! In case you are not completely confident about this word yourself, we hope this blog post helps clear up the issue for you!

Lead or Led?

  • Lead—verb, present tense, rhymes with “seed”—refers to being engaged in actively and presently guiding others. “In my current position as managing director, I lead a team of six analysts in completing market analysis.”
  • Led—verb, past tense, rhymes with “bed”—refers to the act of having guided others at an earlier time or at some point in the past. “Led” is both the past tense and the past participle of “lead.” “As part of my first job after college, I led two summer interns in a competitive assessment” and “I have led multiple teams of salespeople during my five years at the firm.”
Confusing the spelling and/or pronunciation of this verb’s different tenses is a simple mistake but one that stands out clearly to admissions professionals who have probably seen this verb more times in the past year than most people do in a lifetime! So, pay close attention to which is which, and be sure you are using the correct version each time.

The post Monday Morning Essay Tip: Lead or Led? appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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mbaMission

Website: http://www.mbamission.com
Blog: http://www.mbamission.com/blog
mbaMission Insiders Guides: http://www.mbamission.com/guides.php?category=insiders
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B-School Chart of the Week: July 2016 Social Currency Rankings [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2016, 11:01
FROM mbaMission Blog: B-School Chart of the Week: July 2016 Social Currency Rankings
Rankings come in all shapes and sizes, but can any ranking truly capture social cachet? For a different perspective on the value of an MBA, we turn to the New York Times society pages, where the editors select and profile promising couples. Each month, we dedicate one B-School Chart of the Week to tallying how alumni from top-ranked business schools are advancing their social currency ranking.

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As one might have suspected, July was a popular month for weddings—particularly MBA weddings. Last month, the New York Times (NYT) profiled 36 weddings including one or two MBAs from various business schools across the United States. Harvard Business School (HBS) alumni and students were the busiest, as nine brides and grooms associated with the school tied the knot. For one couple, the school will serve as a backdrop for their newlywed bliss—Carolina Delgado Betancourt and Charles Joyce, who married on July 9, will both enroll at HBS this fall along with the rest of the Class of 2019. Similarly, newly married couple Margaret Rohrmann and Haig Nerguizian, who celebrated their nuptials on July 16, are both currently studying for their MBAs at Columbia Business School. According to their wedding profile in the NYT, the couple met at an international student orientation. The Stanford Graduate School of Business was the matchmaker for Shelley Jacobson and Scott Hughes, who were married on July 23. They met while both were pursuing MBAs at the school.

The post B-School Chart of the Week: July 2016 Social Currency Rankings appeared first on mbaMission - MBA Admissions Consulting.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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mbaMission

Website: http://www.mbamission.com
Blog: http://www.mbamission.com/blog
mbaMission Insiders Guides: http://www.mbamission.com/guides.php?category=insiders
Free Consultation: http://www.mbamission.com/consult.php

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