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The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends

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The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends [#permalink]

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The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends a specific daily intake for vitamin C, as greatly exceeding that amount is dangerous. Many vitamin-fortified foods contain 100% of this recommended daily intake for vitamin C in one serving, an amount defined on the package by the manufacturer. However, most consumers overestimate the amount of one serving for these foods, ingesting two to four times what is considered one serving by the manufacturer.

Which of the following is most supported by the information above?

A. Most people eating vitamin-fortified foods are consuming dangerous amounts of vitamin C.

B. Manufacturers need to change the amount listed as one serving on the packaging for vitamin-fortified foods.

C. Any person eating vitamin-fortified foods will receive the daily intake for vitamin C that is recommended by the National Academy of Sciences.

D. Some people eating vitamin-fortified foods exceed the daily intake for vitamin C that is recommended by the National Academy of Sciences.

E. People should avoid taking supplemental vitamin C if they are eating vitamin-fortified foods.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2017, 23:22
Option A best supports the information !

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Re: The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2017, 23:57
The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends a specific daily intake for vitamin C, as greatly exceeding that amount is dangerous. Many vitamin-fortified foods contain 100% of this recommended daily intake for vitamin C in one serving, an amount defined on the package by the manufacturer. However, most consumers overestimate the amount of one serving for these foods, ingesting two to four times what is considered one serving by the manufacturer.

Which of the following is most supported by the information above?

This is an Inference Based Question and we have got to look for the conclusion that we can come to from the above lines. NAS recommends a specific daily intake so that the amount is not exceeded since it maybe be harmful. It also might be noted that Vitamin C intake is also needed to the proper amount else people wouldn't be concerned on taking more of Vitamin C causing an overdose. So, amount is predefined in one serving to prevent overdose but this results in overestimation..

Probable conclusion: Marking must be made properly to ensure proper dosage. [According to me predicting the answer beforehand always give you an extra advantage]

Options:


A. Most people eating vitamin-fortified foods are consuming dangerous amounts of vitamin C.-----incorrect----since most overestimate and might be consuming less

B. Manufacturers need to change the amount listed as one serving on the packaging for vitamin-fortified foods.---correct---matches our prediction

C. Any person eating vitamin-fortified foods will receive the daily intake for vitamin C that is recommended by the National Academy of Sciences.-----incorrect----doesnt consider people who will overestimate and consume only one serving and thus take less than the daily intake

D. Some people eating vitamin-fortified foods exceed the daily intake for vitamin C that is recommended by the National Academy of Sciences.---incorrect---some trap---may or may not be true..cannot be said

E. People should avoid taking supplemental vitamin C if they are eating vitamin-fortified foods.---incorrect---out of scope..nothing is discussed about supplemental vitamin C in the passage.



Am I correct in my explanation.. Can I improve further in my understanding..




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Re: The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends [#permalink]

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kunalsinghNS wrote:
Option A best supports the information !


Hi! Couldn't stop from sharing this:
Question is :
Which of the following is most supported by the information above?
Bold part implies that this is a conclusion question. Not an assumption question.

In Conclusion question Passage has to support the answer. And Answer must be true. "Must be True" or inference" are other names given to Conclusion questions! In a way, conclusion answer choice must restate the existing conclusion in the argument, or connect all the premises to form a conclusion.
In Assumption question, answer choice has to support the argument.

Noticing subtle differences is great for CR problem solving! And I believe "identifying the question type" is 25% of the work in CR question types.

Working out the answer choices, conclusion answer must logically follow the passage argument. You can ask, is this what the author wants us to believe? :

A. Most people eating vitamin-fortified foods are consuming dangerous amounts of vitamin C. Most people over estimate. We don't know whether they consume.

B. Manufacturers need to change the amount listed as one serving on the packaging for vitamin-fortified foods. Irrelevant. This is not author's main point

C. Any person eating vitamin-fortified foods will receive the daily intake for vitamin C that is recommended by the National Academy of Sciences.Close, but Incorrect.
What if "Any" person eating vitamin fortified foods is eating way below the recommended daily serving. Say this "Any" person is consuming only 1% of recommended daily serving. Can't conclude this answer.


D. Some people eating vitamin-fortified foods exceed the daily intake for vitamin C that is recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. Correct.
If people are eating vitamin fortified foods, then most of them do over-estimate the recommended quantity, and some of these most do consume extra quantity, thus exceeding daily intake of vit C. Notice the word "Some". Not "Any" or "All" or "Most". This way conclusion stays true to the argument.


E. People should avoid taking supplemental vitamin C if they are eating vitamin-fortified foods. Out of scope.

Hence, answer is D


Hope I helped! :)
Good Luck!

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The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends [#permalink]

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The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends a specific daily intake for vitamin C, as greatly exceeding that amount is dangerous. Many vitamin-fortified foods contain 100% of this recommended daily intake for vitamin C in one serving, an amount defined on the package by the manufacturer. However, most consumers overestimate the amount of one serving for these foods, ingesting two to four times what is considered one serving by the manufacturer.

Which of the following is most supported by the information above?

A. Most people eating vitamin-fortified foods are consuming dangerous amounts of vitamin C. we are not told how much is a dangerous amount. 2x or 3x the recommended intake..

B. Manufacturers need to change the amount listed as one serving on the packaging for vitamin-fortified foods. no support from argument above. OOS

C. Any person eating vitamin-fortified foods will receive the daily intake for vitamin C that is recommended by the National Academy of Sciences.Most, not all, consumers overestimate the amount of one serving. What if some consumers intake only half serving?

D. Some people eating vitamin-fortified foods exceed the daily intake for vitamin C that is recommended by the National Academy of Sciences.Correct

E. People should avoid taking supplemental vitamin C if they are eating vitamin-fortified foods.no support from argument above

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Re: The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2017, 06:57
AkshayKS21 wrote:
kunalsinghNS wrote:
Option A best supports the information !


Hi! Couldn't stop from sharing this:
Question is :
Which of the following is most supported by the information above?
Bold part implies that this is a conclusion question. Not an assumption question.

In Conclusion question Passage has to support the answer. And Answer must be true. "Must be True" or inference" are other names given to Conclusion questions! In a way, conclusion answer choice must restate the existing conclusion in the argument, or connect all the premises to form a conclusion.
In Assumption question, answer choice has to support the argument.

Noticing subtle differences is great for CR problem solving! And I believe "identifying the question type" is 25% of the work in CR question types.

Working out the answer choices, conclusion answer must logically follow the passage argument. You can ask, is this what the author wants us to believe? :

A. Most people eating vitamin-fortified foods are consuming dangerous amounts of vitamin C. Most people over estimate. We don't know whether they consume.

B. Manufacturers need to change the amount listed as one serving on the packaging for vitamin-fortified foods. Irrelevant. This is not author's main point

C. Any person eating vitamin-fortified foods will receive the daily intake for vitamin C that is recommended by the National Academy of Sciences.Close, but Incorrect.
What if "Any" person eating vitamin fortified foods is eating way below the recommended daily serving. Say this "Any" person is consuming only 1% of recommended daily serving. Can't conclude this answer.


D. Some people eating vitamin-fortified foods exceed the daily intake for vitamin C that is recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. Correct.
If people are eating vitamin fortified foods, then most of them do over-estimate the recommended quantity, and some of these most do consume extra quantity, thus exceeding daily intake of vit C. Notice the word "Some". Not "Any" or "All" or "Most". This way conclusion stays true to the argument.


E. People should avoid taking supplemental vitamin C if they are eating vitamin-fortified foods. Out of scope.

Hence, answer is D


Hope I helped! :)
Good Luck!


In D - I have a question for you - How does 'some people' stay true to the argument?

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Re: The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2017, 07:09
Madhavi1990 wrote:
In D - I have a question for you - How does 'some people' stay true to the argument?


I'm not sure I understood your question.

Argument specifies "Most" people. Most translates to 50% or more. Argument effectively says, out of 100, 50 or more overestimate amount of daily recommendation. So we can say at least 1 of those 50 people could intake what he/she estimates (thus exceeding the recommendation).
At least 1 of 50 = At least 1 of 100.
At least 1 is "Some".
Thus "Some" people is fine here.

Does this makes sense? If not, I request you to make your question more clear :)

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Re: The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends [#permalink]

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Veritas prep OE:
This question stem is asking you to form a conclusion based on the information given, so you must pick the one answer that is guaranteed. As is true for all inference style questions, you should use process of elimination by evaluating each potential conclusion.

For (A), you do know that “most consumers overestimate the amount of one serving for these foods, ingesting two to four times what is considered one serving by the manufacturer” so it is safe to say that most people get more than their daily intake as recommended by the NAS. However, to be dangerous the recommended amounts must be “greatly exceeded” and we have no idea if “two to four times” meets that threshold. As a result this is not a proper inference.

For (B), there is no proof given in the stimulus that manufacturers need to do anything. While it is true that many consumers overestimate the amount of one serving, this does not allow you to conclude that manufacturers need to make a change (maybe the consumers just need to get better at estimating!). This type of prescription is virtually impossible to prove in an inference style question.

For (C), the word “any” makes this easy to eliminate. We know that many, but not necessarily all, vitamin fortified foods contain 100% of the recommended vitamin C and that “most” consumers overestimate a serving. However, this still leaves open the possibility that some people are eating vitamin-fortified foods that do not contain vitamin C or that they are not getting a full serving’s worth.

For (D), you know with certainty that most consumers are eating 2-4 servings of vitamin-fortified foods containing vitamin C, which provides more than 100% of the recommended amount. Since you only need to prove one person has consumed more than a serving of these foods to be sure of this conclusion, it must be true and (D) is correct.

For (E), this is a similar prescription to what you saw in (B). There might be many reasons why someone wants or needs to take a vitamin C supplement even if they are eating the vitamin-fortified foods. Maybe their doctor wants them to have lots of extra vitamin C or maybe they are eating the vitamin-fortified foods that do not contain 100% of the recommended amount. This is not a proper inference.

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Re: The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) recommends   [#permalink] 09 Aug 2017, 11:59
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