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The northern cardinal, a nonmigratory songbird, was rare in Nova S

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The northern cardinal, a nonmigratory songbird, was rare in Nova S  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2018, 02:23
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C
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E

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  15% (low)

Question Stats:

81% (01:45) correct 19% (01:55) wrong based on 77 sessions

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The northern cardinal, a nonmigratory songbird, was rare in Nova Scotia in 1980; the province was considered to be beyond that bird's usual northern range. By 2000, however, field observations indicated that northern cardinals were quite common there. The average winter temperature rose slightly over that period, so warmer winters are probably responsible for the northern cardinal's proliferation in Nova Scotia.

Which one of the following, if true, most weakens the argument?


(A) Bird feeders, an important source of nutrition to wintering birds, became far more common in Nova Scotia after 1980.

(B) Because of their red plumage, northern cardinals are easier to spot than most other songbird species are.

(C) Some songbird species other than the northern cardinal also became more common between 1980 and 2000.

(D) According to field observations, the populations of migratory birds fluctuated less during the period from 1980 to 2000 than the populations of nonmigratory birds.

(E) Birds that prey on songbirds became more common in Nova Scotia between 1980 and 2000.

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Re: The northern cardinal, a nonmigratory songbird, was rare in Nova S  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2018, 23:41
Conclusion : so warmer winters are probably responsible for the northern cardinal's proliferation in Nova Scotia.

question is asking to weaken the conclusion.

Here we have cause --> effect

warmer winters --> northern cardinal's proliferation in Nova Scotia.

To weaken this claim, we have to find a other cause that led to this increase in population.

(A) Bird feeders, an important source of nutrition to wintering birds, became far more common in Nova Scotia after 1980.
---States the another reason for increase perfectly. here we can say, No, warmer winter is not responsible but increase in bird feeders led to northern cardinal's proliferation in Nova Scotia.

So A) must be the answer.
Re: The northern cardinal, a nonmigratory songbird, was rare in Nova S &nbs [#permalink] 19 Aug 2018, 23:41
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The northern cardinal, a nonmigratory songbird, was rare in Nova S

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