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The proliferation of colloquialisms is degrading the English language.

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The proliferation of colloquialisms is degrading the English language.  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2018, 04:34
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The proliferation of colloquialisms is degrading the English language. A phrase such as she was like, "no way!" you know?—a meaningless collection of English words just a few decades ago—is commonly understood by most today to mean she was doubtful. No language can admit imprecise word usage on a large scale without a corresponding decrease in quality.

The argument relies on which of the following assumptions?


(A) Colloquialisms always evolve out of a meaningless collection of words.

(B) The colloquialisms appearing in the English language introduce imprecision into the language on what would be considered a large scale.

(C) The Russian, French, and German languages cannot admit imprecise word usage on a large scale without an inevitable decrease in the quality of those languages.

(D) The English language would not be degraded if there did not exist an alternative informal way to express the sentiment "she was doubtful."

(E) The widespread use of colloquialisms represents the most serious form of language degradation.

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Re: The proliferation of colloquialisms is degrading the English language.  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2018, 07:09
A.

If colloq. were not meaningless, then the author's conclusion about meaningless words degrading quality of Eng language is shattered.
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Re: The proliferation of colloquialisms is degrading the English language.  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2018, 10:28
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The proliferation of colloquialisms is degrading the English language. A phrase such as she was like, "no way!" you know?—a meaningless collection of English words just a few decades ago—is commonly understood by most today to mean she was doubtful. No language can admit imprecise word usage on a large scale without a corresponding decrease in quality.

The argument relies on which of the following assumptions?

(B) The colloquialisms appearing in the English language introduce imprecision into the language on what would be considered a large scale.


colloquialisms ----> meaningless collection of English words ---->
Conclusion : imprecise word usage on a large scale causes a corresponding decrease in quality.

The gap is precisely filled by option B that says that colloquialisms introduce imprecision.

--B--
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Re: The proliferation of colloquialisms is degrading the English language.  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2018, 11:30
1+ For B.
Options A,D and E are extreme
C is irrelevant.
Assumption:- implementation of colloquialisms degrades language quality

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Re: The proliferation of colloquialisms is degrading the English language.  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2018, 03:17
The argument says imprecise word usage on large scale is responsible for decrease in quality of language and the conclusion says colloquialisms are degrading English language. Therefore, colloquialisms in English language must be involving large scale usage of meaningless words. Only B fills the gap.
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Re: The proliferation of colloquialisms is degrading the English language.  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2018, 01:53
Bunuel wrote:
The proliferation of colloquialisms is degrading the English language. A phrase such as she was like, "no way!" you know?—a meaningless collection of English words just a few decades ago—is commonly understood by most today to mean she was doubtful. No language can admit imprecise word usage on a large scale without a corresponding decrease in quality.

The argument relies on which of the following assumptions?


(A) Colloquialisms always evolve out of a meaningless collection of words.

(B) The colloquialisms appearing in the English language introduce imprecision into the language on what would be considered a large scale.

(C) The Russian, French, and German languages cannot admit imprecise word usage on a large scale without an inevitable decrease in the quality of those languages.

(D) The English language would not be degraded if there did not exist an alternative informal way to express the sentiment "she was doubtful."

(E) The widespread use of colloquialisms represents the most serious form of language degradation.


KAPLAN OFFICIAL EXPLANATION:



How's that for eloquence? The strange part is that most of us really have no problem understanding the meaning of this phrase. Which is, in fact, the author's beef in the stimulus. He gets right to the point: the conclusion that the increase in colloquialisms degrades the English language. For evidence, the author then (1) gives us an example of a colloquialism, the illustrious phrase in the title above, and (2) states that imprecise word usage on a large scale basically decreases the quality of the language, hence, the tie in with the conclusion in the first sentence. The assumption resides in the gaps between these pieces of information; we were never told that these colloquialisms were rampant or imprecise. Indeed, the author states that imprecise words admitted on a large scale decrease a language's quality, without showing that colloquialisms really fall into either category. That omission constitutes the shift in scope. For the author's conclusion to be valid based on this evidence, he must assume that the evidence is relevant to the conclusion, and that colloquialisms are both imprecise and prevalent in English. The right answer choice, (B), picks up on both. Without this, the evidence simply doesn't lead all the way to the conclusion.

(A) focuses on the source of colloquialisms, which the author addresses but which plays a central role in neither the evidence nor the conclusion. This could or could not be true without impacting the conclusion.

(C) basically restates the evidence. If "no language" can permit such laxity, then these three languages would logically follow along, but since the stimulus already tells us this much, (C) is not a necessary assumption here.

An 800 test taker recognizes the difference between a stated piece of evidence and an unstated—yet required—part of an argument (i.e., its assumption).

(D), if anything, presents us with a flawed inference, which would only be accurate if the author assumed that the stated colloquialism were the only colloquialism in English, and that only colloquialisms degrade the English language. He assumes neither, so if this were an Inference question, (D) would be wrong on these counts. As far as being assumed—that is, being something that's required by the argument—(D) is even further off base.

(E) is too extreme. The author identifies one cause (proliferating colloquialisms) which leads to one effect (like, um, degraded English). To make this argument, he does not need to assume that this cause is more or less serious than any other. Even if colloquialisms were a minor part of this problem, the author's conclusion could still be valid.
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Resources:
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Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


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Re: The proliferation of colloquialisms is degrading the English language. &nbs [#permalink] 02 Aug 2018, 01:53
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