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There are three groupings of naturally occurring radiation,

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There are three groupings of naturally occurring radiation,  [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2012, 00:57
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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83% (01:35) correct 17% (01:55) wrong based on 182 sessions

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There are three groupings of naturally occurring radiation, mostly based on where the radiation comes from: radioactive material in the environment, such as in soil, rock, or building materials, cosmic rays; and substances in the human body, such as radioactive potassium in bone and radioactive carbon tissues


A., such as in soil, rock, or building materials, cosmic rays; and substances in the human body, such as radioactive potassium in bone and radioactive carbon tissues

B such as in soil, rock, or building materials; cosmic rays; and substances in the human body, such as radioactive potassium in bone and radioactive carbon in tissues

C such as in soil, rock, or building materials, cosmic rays; and substances in the human body, such as radioactive potassium in bone and radioactive carbon tissues

D such as soil, rock, or building materials; cosmic rays, and substances in the human body, like radioactive potassium in bone and radioactive carbon in tissues

E. such as in soil, rock, or building materials; cosmic rays, and substances in the human body, comparable to radioactive potassium in bone and radioactive carbon in tissues
( from my personal collections. OA after some discussion)
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Re: Parallelism. diction style semicolon  [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2012, 01:16
1
I think the answer is B

The sentence structure requires us to recognize three separate groups of naturally occurring radiation.
1. Soil, rock or building materials
2. cosmic rays
3. substances in the human body.

Choice A uses a comma to distinguish the first group from the second and a semicolon between the second and third group: seems structurally suspect.
Choice B does this well with the use of semicolons.
Choice D doesn't seem right because of its use of 'like'
Choice E is structurally sound but I feel it changes the meaning of the sentence.
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Re: Parallelism. diction style semicolon  [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2012, 05:51
I think it should be "B"
I think , here semi colon ; is wrongly used
; can be used in two cases either two IC to be separated by ; or Items can be separated by ; (as per MGMT)
therefore except options "B" all fall apart ..
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Re: Parallelism. diction style semicolon  [#permalink]

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New post 12 May 2012, 21:26
OA is B for the reasons pointed out by every one
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Re: Parallelism. diction style semicolon  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2012, 03:51
The correct answer is E. The use of "and" after the semi colon is incorrect.
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Re: Parallelism. diction style semicolon  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2012, 06:03
Oh! sorry. In B, the use of and after the semicolon is a terrible typo. After all it may be seen what follows and is not an IC. But E also is not the answer considering that E changes the meaning. There is no comparison involved in the list to call any factor comparable. In addition E breaks the semicolon rule without the follow up with an IC.

May be B is the best of the worst, after amending the typo. I admit that testing a sentence with just the use of semicolon and with a little bit of //ism isn’t ideally gmattish.
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Re: Parallelism. diction style semicolon  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Aug 2012, 01:54
I googled around on the use of semi-colon an found a relevant item


http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/semicolons.asp


Rule 1
Use a semicolon in place of a period to separate two sentences where the conjunction has been left out.

Examples:
Call me tomorrow; I will give you my answer then.
I have paid my dues; therefore, I expect all the privileges listed in the contract.

Rule 2
It is preferable to use a semicolon before introductory words such as namely, however, therefore, that is, i.e., for example, e.g., or for instance when they introduce a complete sentence. It is also preferable to use a comma after the introductory word.

Examples:
You will want to bring many backpacking items; for example, sleeping bags, pans, and warm clothing will make the trip better.
As we discussed, you will bring two items; i.e., a sleeping bag and a tent are not optional.

Rule 3
Use either a semicolon or a comma before introductory words such as namely, however, therefore, that is, i.e., for example, e.g., or for instance when they introduce a list following a complete sentence. Use a comma after the introductory word.

Examples:
You will want to bring many backpacking items; for example, sleeping bags, pans, and warm clothing.
You will want to bring many backpacking items, for example, sleeping bags, pans, and warm clothing.
Rule 4
Use the semicolon to separate units of a series when one or more of the units contain commas.

Example:
This conference has people who have come from Boise, Idaho; Los Angeles, California; and Nashville, Tennessee.

Rule 5
Use the semicolon between two sentences joined by a coordinating conjunction when one or more commas appear in the first sentence.
Examples:

When I finish here, I will be glad to help you; and that is a promise I will keep.
If she can, she will attempt that feat; and if her husband is able, he will be there
to see her.

I first thought, it was not right to usesemi-colon and; therefore I too thought B is not so good afterall. But a deeper research says, B is quite ok. As such I think you are right in saying that there is nothing wrong.

The fifth point of this note says that and is usable after a semi-colon. I was first not aware of this. Any thoughts?
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Re: Parallelism. diction style semicolon  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Aug 2012, 02:16
daagh wrote:
I googled around on the use of semi-colon an found a relevant item


http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/semicolons.asp


Rule 1
Use a semicolon in place of a period to separate two sentences where the conjunction has been left out.

Examples:
Call me tomorrow; I will give you my answer then.
I have paid my dues; therefore, I expect all the privileges listed in the contract.

Rule 2
It is preferable to use a semicolon before introductory words such as namely, however, therefore, that is, i.e., for example, e.g., or for instance when they introduce a complete sentence. It is also preferable to use a comma after the introductory word.

Examples:
You will want to bring many backpacking items; for example, sleeping bags, pans, and warm clothing will make the trip better.
As we discussed, you will bring two items; i.e., a sleeping bag and a tent are not optional.

Rule 3
Use either a semicolon or a comma before introductory words such as namely, however, therefore, that is, i.e., for example, e.g., or for instance when they introduce a list following a complete sentence. Use a comma after the introductory word.

Examples:
You will want to bring many backpacking items; for example, sleeping bags, pans, and warm clothing.
You will want to bring many backpacking items, for example, sleeping bags, pans, and warm clothing.
Rule 4
Use the semicolon to separate units of a series when one or more of the units contain commas.

Example:
This conference has people who have come from Boise, Idaho; Los Angeles, California; and Nashville, Tennessee.

Rule 5
Use the semicolon between two sentences joined by a coordinating conjunction when one or more commas appear in the first sentence.
Examples:

When I finish here, I will be glad to help you; and that is a promise I will keep.
If she can, she will attempt that feat; and if her husband is able, he will be there
to see her.

I first thought, it was not right to usesemi-colon and; therefore I too thought B is not so good afterall. But a deepert research says, B is quite o0k. As such I think you are right in saying that theer is nothing wrong.

The fifth point of this note says that and is usable after a semi-colon. I was first not aware of this. Any thoughts?


Very nice analysis!

Regarding the fifth point, in general:
Sentence after a semicolon is merely a sub-sentence of the sentence prior to the semicolon.
Therefore, it is completely acceptable to use conjunctions such as and/therefore because the second sentence after the semicolon can't exist without the first or rather most of the times uses the info in the first(info can be a subject/any other meaningful info).
However, one must not use and after semicolon in order to inform the reader that hey buddy, don't forget to read these words after the semicolon(meaning, a double emphasis of semicolon is put here unduly)
Otherwise, in cases such as providing a list etc, the use of and is fine enough.

Thanks many!
Kudos too if any :)!
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Re: There are three groupings of naturally occurring radiation,  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2012, 12:44
As MGMAT SC book says about the use of semicolon:
1. semicolon to be used in case joining two independent clauses that are related in meaning/theme
2. separating list items that themselves have comma

In this particular questions, rule 2 goes well. Hence B in the correct choice.
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Re: There are three groupings of naturally occurring radiation,  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2012, 20:37
dexerash wrote:
As MGMAT SC book says about the use of semicolon:
1. semicolon to be used in case joining two independent clauses that are related in meaning/theme
2. separating list items that themselves have comma

In this particular questions, rule 2 goes well. Hence B in the correct choice.



I dont think B fits the criteria above. "cosmic rays" is one unit and doesn't havea comma separating it. maybe it would be more appropriate to use B if it was "x-rays, gamma rays and micro waves;"
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Re: There are three groupings of naturally occurring radiation,  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Sep 2012, 21:47
RoyHalladay wrote:
dexerash wrote:
As MGMAT SC book says about the use of semicolon:
1. semicolon to be used in case joining two independent clauses that are related in meaning/theme
2. separating list items that themselves have comma

In this particular questions, rule 2 goes well. Hence B in the correct choice.



I dont think B fits the criteria above. "cosmic rays" is one unit and doesn't havea comma separating it. maybe it would be more appropriate to use B if it was "x-rays, gamma rays and micro waves;"



There are three parts in this sentence - There are three groupings of naturally occurring radiation, mostly based on where the radiation comes from
Thereafter, those 3 parts are followed by semicolon - : 1. radioactive material in the environment, such as in soil, rock, or building materials;
2. cosmic rays; and
3. substances in the human body, such as radioactive potassium in bone and radioactive carbon tissues

Since each part has commas so it is better to separate all the parts by semicolon, which is same as rule # 2.
As you mentioned, "cosmic rays" is one unit - TRUE, but it has to be separated by either comma or semicolon. Since other 2 parts have commas in themselves so it is better to use semicolon to separate that particular unit.

Hope this helps!
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Re: There are three groupings of naturally occurring radiation,  [#permalink]

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New post 20 May 2015, 02:06
1st POE:-such as for examples "such as radioactive potassium in bone and radioactive carbon tissues" Eliminate D&E

2nd POE:-B gives the correct parallelism , so B is the correct answer.

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Re: There are three groupings of naturally occurring radiation,  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2018, 08:31
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Re: There are three groupings of naturally occurring radiation, &nbs [#permalink] 10 Jun 2018, 08:31
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