GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 17 Feb 2019, 08:00

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in February
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
272829303112
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
242526272812
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Free GMAT Algebra Webinar

     February 17, 2019

     February 17, 2019

     07:00 AM PST

     09:00 AM PST

    Attend this Free Algebra Webinar and learn how to master Inequalities and Absolute Value problems on GMAT.
  • Valentine's day SALE is on! 25% off.

     February 18, 2019

     February 18, 2019

     10:00 PM PST

     11:00 PM PST

    We don’t care what your relationship status this year - we love you just the way you are. AND we want you to crush the GMAT!

Those who opine lose their impunity when the circumstances in which

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 31 Aug 2016
Posts: 203
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Finance
GMAT 1: 680 Q49 V33
GMAT 2: 700 Q49 V37
GPA: 2.81
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Those who opine lose their impunity when the circumstances in which  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Oct 2018, 08:06
Those who opine lose their impunity when the circumstances in which they pontificate are such that generate from their expression a positive instigation of some mischievous act. An opinion that corn dealers are starvers of the poor, or that owning private property is robbery, ought to be unmolested when simply circulated through the press, but may justly incur punishment when delivered orally to an excited mob assembled before the house of a corn dealer, or when handed about among the same mob in the form of a placard. Acts, of whatever kind, which without justifiable cause do harm to others, may be, and in the more important cases are absolutely required to be, controlled by the unfavourable sentiments, and, when needful, by the active interference of mankind. The liberty of the individual must be thus far limited; he must not make himself a nuisance to other people. But if he refrains from molesting others in matters that concern them, and merely acts according to his own inclination and judgment in matters which concern himself he should be allowed, without molestation, to carry his opinions into practice at his own cost. As it is useful that while mankind are imperfect there should be different opinions, so it is that there should be different experiments of
living, that free scope should be given to varieties of character, short of injury to others, and that the worth of different modes of life should be proved practically, when anyone thinks fit to try them. Where not the person‘s own character but the traditions and customs of other people are the rule of conduct, there is wanting one of the principal ingredients of individual and social progress.

It would be absurd to pretend that people ought to live as if nothing whatever had been known in the world before they came into it; as if experience had as yet done nothing toward showing that one mode of existence, or of conduct, is preferable to another. Nobody denies that people should be so taught and trained in youth as to know and benefit by the ascertained results of human experience. But it is the privilege and proper condition of a human being, arrived at the maturity of his faculties, to use and interpret experience in his own way. It is for him to find out what part of recorded experience is properly applicable to his own circumstances and character. The traditions and customs of other people are, to a certain extent, evidence of what their experience has taught them—presumptive evidence, and as such, have a claim to his deference—but, in the first place, their experience may be too narrow, or they may have not interpreted it rightly. Secondly, their interpretation of experience may be correct, but unsuited to him. Customs are made for circumstances and customary characters, and his customary circumstances or his character may be uncustomary. Thirdly, though the customs be both good as customs and suitable to him, yet to conform to custom merely as custom does not educate him or develop in him any of the qualities which are the distinctive endowments of a human being. He gains no practice either in discerning or desiring what is best.


1. Based on information in the passage, with which of the following statements about opinions would the author most likely NOT disagree?

A. Different opinions exist because people are imperfect.

B. An opinion can be relatively harmless in one context and dangerous in another.

C. Opinions directed specifically against fellow human beings should be punished.

D. All expressions of opinion should really be considered actions.

E. An opinion always has an additional unintended effect

2. The author holds that one should not necessarily defer to the traditions and customs of other people. The author supports his position by arguing that:

I. traditions and customs are usually the result of misinterpreted experiences.
II. customs are based on experiences in the past, which are different from modern experiences.
III. customs can stifle one‘s individual development.

A. II only
B. III only
C. I and III only
D. II and III only
E. None of the above

3. The existence of which of the following phenomena would most strongly challenge the author‘s argument about “conforming to custom merely as custom”?

A. A class in morality taught at a parochial high school

B. An important discovery made by a researcher who uses unconventional methods

C. A culture in which it is traditional to let children make their own decisions

D. A custom that involves celebrating a noteworthy historical event

E. a culture in which only the senior-most person takes the important decisions


_________________

Resources
GMATNinja Webinars
GMATNinja Chats

Quant
Mixtures

Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 52911
Re: Those who opine lose their impunity when the circumstances in which  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Oct 2018, 08:14
1
PeepalTree wrote:
Those who opine lose their impunity when the circumstances in which they pontificate are such that generate from their expression a positive instigation of some mischievous act. An opinion that corn dealers are starvers of the poor, or that owning private property is robbery, ought to be unmolested when simply circulated through the press, but may justly incur punishment when delivered orally to an excited mob assembled before the house of a corn dealer, or when handed about among the same mob in the form of a placard. Acts, of whatever kind, which without justifiable cause do harm to others, may be, and in the more important cases are absolutely required to be, controlled by the unfavourable sentiments, and, when needful, by the active interference of mankind. The liberty of the individual must be thus far limited; he must not make himself a nuisance to other people. But if he refrains from molesting others in matters that concern them, and merely acts according to his own inclination and judgment in matters which concern himself he should be allowed, without molestation, to carry his opinions into practice at his own cost. As it is useful that while mankind are imperfect there should be different opinions, so it is that there should be different experiments of
living, that free scope should be given to varieties of character, short of injury to others, and that the worth of different modes of life should be proved practically, when anyone thinks fit to try them. Where not the person‘s own character but the traditions and customs of other people are the rule of conduct, there is wanting one of the principal ingredients of individual and social progress.

It would be absurd to pretend that people ought to live as if nothing whatever had been known in the world before they came into it; as if experience had as yet done nothing toward showing that one mode of existence, or of conduct, is preferable to another. Nobody denies that people should be so taught and trained in youth as to know and benefit by the ascertained results of human experience. But it is the privilege and proper condition of a human being, arrived at the maturity of his faculties, to use and interpret experience in his own way. It is for him to find out what part of recorded experience is properly applicable to his own circumstances and character. The traditions and customs of other people are, to a certain extent, evidence of what their experience has taught them—presumptive evidence, and as such, have a claim to his deference—but, in the first place, their experience may be too narrow, or they may have not interpreted it rightly. Secondly, their interpretation of experience may be correct, but unsuited to him. Customs are made for circumstances and customary characters, and his customary circumstances or his character may be uncustomary. Thirdly, though the customs be both good as customs and suitable to him, yet to conform to custom merely as custom does not educate him or develop in him any of the qualities which are the distinctive endowments of a human being. He gains no practice either in discerning or desiring what is best.

1. Based on information in the passage, with which of the following statements about opinions would the author most likely NOT disagree?

A. Different opinions exist because people are imperfect.

B. An opinion can be relatively harmless in one context and dangerous in another.

C. Opinions directed specifically against fellow human beings should be punished.

D. All expressions of opinion should really be considered actions.

E. An opinion always has an additional unintended effect
2. The author holds that one should not necessarily defer to the traditions and customs of other people. The author supports his position by arguing that:

I. traditions and customs are usually the result of misinterpreted experiences.
II. customs are based on experiences in the past, which are different from modern experiences.
III. customs can stifle one‘s individual development.

A. II only
B. III only
C. I and III only
D. II and III only
E. None of the above
3. The existence of which of the following phenomena would most strongly challenge the author‘s argument about “conforming to custom merely as custom”?

A. A class in morality taught at a parochial high school

B. An important discovery made by a researcher who uses unconventional methods

C. A culture in which it is traditional to let children make their own decisions

D. A custom that involves celebrating a noteworthy historical event

E. a culture in which only the senior-most person takes the important decisions



Discussed here: https://gmatclub.com/forum/those-who-op ... 95316.html
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

GMAT Club Bot
Re: Those who opine lose their impunity when the circumstances in which   [#permalink] 09 Oct 2018, 08:14
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Those who opine lose their impunity when the circumstances in which

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.