It is currently 18 Oct 2017, 23:01

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

3 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Affiliations: CFA Level 2 Candidate
Joined: 29 Jun 2009
Posts: 220

Kudos [?]: 283 [3], given: 2

Schools: RD 2: Darden Class of 2012
To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Oct 2009, 06:59
3
This post received
KUDOS
8
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  15% (low)

Question Stats:

66% (00:12) correct 34% (00:13) wrong based on 485 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague caused The Black Death, a pandemic that swept the world in the middle of the fourteenth century.

(A) whether
(B) whether or not
(C) about whether
(D) as to whether
(E) if
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Kudos [?]: 283 [3], given: 2

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 08 Oct 2009
Posts: 61

Kudos [?]: 30 [0], given: 5

Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Oct 2009, 14:41
Yup [A] for me too. if is used only in hypothetical situations .. if x happened ...

Kudos [?]: 30 [0], given: 5

Current Student
avatar
Joined: 21 May 2012
Posts: 97

Kudos [?]: 42 [0], given: 0

Location: United States (CA)
Reviews Badge
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 May 2012, 14:46
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague caused The Black Death, a pandemic that swept the world in the middle of the fourteenth century.

a) whether
b) whether or not
c) about whether
d) as to whether
e) if

Kudos [?]: 42 [0], given: 0

Current Student
avatar
Joined: 21 May 2012
Posts: 97

Kudos [?]: 42 [0], given: 0

Location: United States (CA)
Reviews Badge
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 May 2012, 14:49
What is the specific rule regarding the phrase "whether or not" ? In this example, the explanation says that whether is the correct phrase and that "whether or not" is redundant.

Here is another example used on the GMAT SC

"Whether or not the board understands the ramifications of the proposal depends on how clearly the costs and benefits are laid out in the presentation this afternoon."

So why is it okay to use "whether or not" here but not in the OP?

Kudos [?]: 42 [0], given: 0

2 KUDOS received
Kellogg MMM ThreadMaster
User avatar
B
Joined: 29 Mar 2012
Posts: 322

Kudos [?]: 514 [2], given: 23

Location: India
GMAT 1: 640 Q50 V26
GMAT 2: 660 Q50 V28
GMAT 3: 730 Q50 V38
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 May 2012, 23:35
2
This post received
KUDOS
2
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Hi,

"whether" and "or not" should be kept apart.

For ex -
Right: Tell me whether you are coming or not?
Right: Tell me whether you are coming?
Wrong: Tell me whether or not you are coming?

Although on googling, I found this:
“when a whether clause modifies a verb, or not is needed"...and I am puzzled too!

Regards,

Kudos [?]: 514 [2], given: 23

Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 22 Dec 2011
Posts: 46

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 2

Concentration: Entrepreneurship
GMAT 1: 680 Q47 V36
GMAT 2: 700 Q49 V37
GPA: 3.5
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Jun 2012, 15:59
"whether or not" is always wrong. It is considered redundant on the GMAT. Whether is the correct choice. Collect your points and move on.

Kudos [?]: 13 [0], given: 2

Expert Post
Manhattan Prep Instructor
User avatar
Joined: 30 Apr 2012
Posts: 798

Kudos [?]: 831 [0], given: 5

Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jun 2012, 22:23
Cares wrote:
What is the specific rule regarding the phrase "whether or not" ? In this example, the explanation says that whether is the correct phrase and that "whether or not" is redundant.

Here is another example used on the GMAT SC

"Whether or not the board understands the ramifications of the proposal depends on how clearly the costs and benefits are laid out in the presentation this afternoon."

So why is it okay to use "whether or not" here but not in the OP?



I agree with roboas - "Whether or not" is consistently viewed as redundant on the GMAT and therefore incorrect (one of the few times you will use concision to make eliminations on Sentence Correction).

Did the 2nd example you cited come from the OG? If so, is "whether or not" part of the underlined portion?
_________________


Kyle Widdison | Manhattan GMAT Instructor | Utah


Manhattan GMAT Discount | Manhattan GMAT Course Reviews | View Instructor Profile



Kudos [?]: 831 [0], given: 5

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 13 Jan 2012
Posts: 304

Kudos [?]: 216 [0], given: 38

Weight: 170lbs
GMAT 1: 740 Q48 V42
GMAT 2: 760 Q50 V42
WE: Analyst (Other)
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Jun 2012, 02:54
Eliminate C (you debate something, not about something), D, and E.

A or B.

I went with B here and am happy to have learned that "whether or not" is always incorrect on the GMAT!

Kudos [?]: 216 [0], given: 38

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 02 May 2012
Posts: 108

Kudos [?]: 74 [1], given: 34

Location: United Kingdom
WE: Account Management (Other)
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2012, 03:41
1
This post received
KUDOS
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Hi GMATers,

I came across the below in the free MGMAT CAT and wouldn't mind your view on it.

To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague caused The Black Death, a pandemic that swept the world in the middle of the fourteenth century.

whether
whether or not
about whether
as to whether
if

The official answer is (a) for it's concision, but I put (b) on the idea that 'whether or not' is an idiom. So what I'm trying to get my head around is in situations where concision can occur without prejudicing meaning, or an idiom if offered, what trumps what?

Thanks

B.
_________________

In the study cave!

Kudos [?]: 74 [1], given: 34

4 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 12 Jul 2011
Posts: 128

Kudos [?]: 560 [4], given: 41

Concentration: Strategy, Sustainability
Schools: Booth '15 (M)
WE: Business Development (Non-Profit and Government)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jul 2012, 05:01
4
This post received
KUDOS
When people debate things, they argue different sides of an issue. The or not is not needed because the issue of "whether" only has two sides, so it's not necessary to say "whether or not."

For example:
They are debating the legitimacy of the law. (This is a two-sided issue, but it's not necessary to say "the legitimacy or illegitimacy.")
They are debating the legality of his actions. (This is a two-sided issue, but it's not necessary to say "legality or illegality.")
They are debating which color is the best. (This issue has more than two sides.)
_________________

My GMAT debrief

Kudos [?]: 560 [4], given: 41

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 02 May 2012
Posts: 108

Kudos [?]: 74 [0], given: 34

Location: United Kingdom
WE: Account Management (Other)
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jul 2012, 06:50
Thanks NonYankee. I can see what you're saying, if a debate/decision/choice etc is binary, the or not
isn't necessary because its implied. In other words if not one, it must be the other.... and I actually agree. But my question is more about the conflict between an idiom ('whether or not') and the concision. Many idioms are not the most concise way of presenting an idea.

Perhaps it would be useful to outline what I think an idiom is (because I'm more than likely wrong): An idiom is a nuance of a language that allows us to speak/write in a way that isn't strictly grammatically correct.

I read your 800 debrief the other day too, well done!
_________________

In the study cave!

Kudos [?]: 74 [0], given: 34

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 12 Jul 2011
Posts: 128

Kudos [?]: 560 [0], given: 41

Concentration: Strategy, Sustainability
Schools: Booth '15 (M)
WE: Business Development (Non-Profit and Government)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jul 2012, 09:30
bradfris wrote:
Thanks NonYankee. I can see what you're saying, if a debate/decision/choice etc is binary, the or not
isn't necessary because its implied. In other words if not one, it must be the other.... and I actually agree. But my question is more about the conflict between an idiom ('whether or not') and the concision. Many idioms are not the most concise way of presenting an idea.

Perhaps it would be useful to outline what I think an idiom is (because I'm more than likely wrong): An idiom is a nuance of a language that allows us to speak/write in a way that isn't strictly grammatically correct.

I read your 800 debrief the other day too, well done!


Thanks, I hope you found my debrief interesting! Regarding idioms, we're in a same boat (pardon the idiom). I remember seeing "idiom" used as part of a SC answer explanation in OG 12. The sentence said something like the supreme court declared (something) unconstitutional, but the correct answer inverted the structure to be the supreme court declared unconstitutional (something) because the "something" was a long, complex phrase. I had never thought of declaring something unconstitutional as idiomatic, but I guess that goes to show my understanding of idioms (in a linguistic sense) is quite limited. I grew up thinking idioms were simply the phrases misunderstood by Amelia Bedilia.

The GMAT SC guidelines are something like the following (this is not necessarily the most current wording):
Choose the answer that produces the most effective sentence; this answer should be clear and exact, without awkwardness, ambiguity, redundancy, or grammatical error.

Per those instructions, I don't think there's ever a time it would be desirable to add unneeded words to make something idiomatic. Knowledge of idioms would be helpful in knowing whether something is free of grammatical error, however.
_________________

My GMAT debrief

Kudos [?]: 560 [0], given: 41

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 09 Jan 2013
Posts: 66

Kudos [?]: 19 [0], given: 6

Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Nov 2013, 07:28
To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague caused The Black Death, a pandemic that swept the world in the middle of the fourteenth century.

a) whether
b) whether or not
c) about whether
d) as to whether
e) if

Need detailed explanation. Is "whether or not" redundant according to GMAT?

Kudos [?]: 19 [0], given: 6

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 23 Nov 2010
Posts: 53

Kudos [?]: 38 [0], given: 85

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Aug 2014, 22:51
NonYankee wrote:
bradfris wrote:
Thanks NonYankee. I can see what you're saying, if a debate/decision/choice etc is binary, the or not
isn't necessary because its implied. In other words if not one, it must be the other.... and I actually agree. But my question is more about the conflict between an idiom ('whether or not') and the concision. Many idioms are not the most concise way of presenting an idea.

Perhaps it would be useful to outline what I think an idiom is (because I'm more than likely wrong): An idiom is a nuance of a language that allows us to speak/write in a way that isn't strictly grammatically correct.

I read your 800 debrief the other day too, well done!


Thanks, I hope you found my debrief interesting! Regarding idioms, we're in a same boat (pardon the idiom). I remember seeing "idiom" used as part of a SC answer explanation in OG 12. The sentence said something like the supreme court declared (something) unconstitutional, but the correct answer inverted the structure to be the supreme court declared unconstitutional (something) because the "something" was a long, complex phrase. I had never thought of declaring something unconstitutional as idiomatic, but I guess that goes to show my understanding of idioms (in a linguistic sense) is quite limited. I grew up thinking idioms were simply the phrases misunderstood by Amelia Bedilia.

The GMAT SC guidelines are something like the following (this is not necessarily the most current wording):
Choose the answer that produces the most effective sentence; this answer should be clear and exact, without awkwardness, ambiguity, redundancy, or grammatical error.

Per those instructions, I don't think there's ever a time it would be desirable to add unneeded words to make something idiomatic. Knowledge of idioms would be helpful in knowing whether something is free of grammatical error, however.



Please can you elaborate on 'as to whether' being incorrect? Is it because of redundancy?

Kudos [?]: 38 [0], given: 85

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 23 Nov 2010
Posts: 53

Kudos [?]: 38 [0], given: 85

GMAT ToolKit User
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Aug 2014, 22:54
NonYankee wrote:
bradfris wrote:
Thanks NonYankee. I can see what you're saying, if a debate/decision/choice etc is binary, the or not
isn't necessary because its implied. In other words if not one, it must be the other.... and I actually agree. But my question is more about the conflict between an idiom ('whether or not') and the concision. Many idioms are not the most concise way of presenting an idea.

Perhaps it would be useful to outline what I think an idiom is (because I'm more than likely wrong): An idiom is a nuance of a language that allows us to speak/write in a way that isn't strictly grammatically correct.

I read your 800 debrief the other day too, well done!


Thanks, I hope you found my debrief interesting! Regarding idioms, we're in a same boat (pardon the idiom). I remember seeing "idiom" used as part of a SC answer explanation in OG 12. The sentence said something like the supreme court declared (something) unconstitutional, but the correct answer inverted the structure to be the supreme court declared unconstitutional (something) because the "something" was a long, complex phrase. I had never thought of declaring something unconstitutional as idiomatic, but I guess that goes to show my understanding of idioms (in a linguistic sense) is quite limited. I grew up thinking idioms were simply the phrases misunderstood by Amelia Bedilia.

The GMAT SC guidelines are something like the following (this is not necessarily the most current wording):
Choose the answer that produces the most effective sentence; this answer should be clear and exact, without awkwardness, ambiguity, redundancy, or grammatical error.

Per those instructions, I don't think there's ever a time it would be desirable to add unneeded words to make something idiomatic. Knowledge of idioms would be helpful in knowing whether something is free of grammatical error, however.


Is 'as to whether ’ incorrect due to wordy/redundancy?

Kudos [?]: 38 [0], given: 85

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 12 Jul 2011
Posts: 128

Kudos [?]: 560 [1], given: 41

Concentration: Strategy, Sustainability
Schools: Booth '15 (M)
WE: Business Development (Non-Profit and Government)
Premium Member Reviews Badge
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2014, 11:22
1
This post received
KUDOS
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
unuk50 wrote:
Is 'as to whether' incorrect due to wordy/redundancy?


Yes, it's incorrect due to redundancy. "As to" prior to a noun phrase generally can be taken to mean "regarding" or "about." One need not "debate about whether"--one may simply "debate whether."

The following would be a correct way to use "debate as to whether":
There is a debate as to whether goldfish are smarter than humans.

The following is a suboptimal (i.e. wrong, in the world of GMAT) way to use "debate as to whether":
Scientists debate as to whether goldfish are smarter than humans.

Notice that in the first example, debate is a noun; in the second example, debate is a verb.
_________________

My GMAT debrief

Kudos [?]: 560 [1], given: 41

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Apr 2014
Posts: 143

Kudos [?]: 73 [0], given: 1474

Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Aug 2014, 15:46
Hi,
Can someone come up with the difference between option a and option b? Is "whether or not" always wrong in GMAT?

Kudos [?]: 73 [0], given: 1474

3 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 12 May 2013
Posts: 81

Kudos [?]: 42 [3], given: 12

Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Aug 2014, 05:10
3
This post received
KUDOS
maggie27 wrote:
Hi,
Can someone come up with the difference between option a and option b? Is "whether or not" always wrong in GMAT?


hey,
"whether or not" is considered redundant and that is why it is always wrong in SC , so always prefer "whether" to "whether or not"
:)

Kudos [?]: 42 [3], given: 12

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 25 Apr 2014
Posts: 143

Kudos [?]: 73 [0], given: 1474

Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Aug 2014, 10:13
thanks buddy! kudos to u :)

Kudos [?]: 73 [0], given: 1474

GMAT Club Legend
GMAT Club Legend
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10118

Kudos [?]: 261 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Nov 2014, 10:54
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.

Kudos [?]: 261 [0], given: 0

Re: To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c   [#permalink] 20 Nov 2014, 10:54

Go to page    1   2    Next  [ 30 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

To this day, researchers and theorists debate whether bubonic plague c

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.