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User's self-made question

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Manager
Manager
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Status: Student
Joined: 14 Jul 2019
Posts: 135
Location: United States
Concentration: Accounting, Finance
GPA: 3.9
WE: Education (Accounting)
User's self-made question  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2019, 15:24
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

0% (00:00) correct 100% (00:56) wrong based on 2 sessions

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x is a positive integer.

True or false?

\(x^2−10x+24\)=0

Statement 1: x is an even integer

Statement 2: x<8
Manager
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Joined: 16 May 2019
Posts: 140
Re: User's self-made question  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2019, 16:30
minustark wrote:
x is a positive integer.

True or false?

\(x^2−10x+24\)=0

Statement 1: x is an even integer

Statement 2: x<8


Hello, minustark. I appreciate the effort to contribute high-quality questions to the forum. At the same time, this one troubles me a little, as neither statement is necessary to solve the question, and GMAT™ DS questions rely on the statements for test-taking purposes. That is, this quadratic is factorable: (x - 6)(x - 4) = 0. The solutions will be 6 and 4. So yes, x is a positive integer either way, but the statements have nothing to do with that fact.

Statement (1): Okay, x can still be 6 or 4, either of which is a positive integer. √ True

Statement (2): Again, x can still be 6 or 4, either of which is a positive integer. √ True

I guess that means the answer is (D), since each statement can be taken independently and lead to confirming our pre-solved problem, but the process of discovery seems to be lacking. Is there a specific official question you have come across to which you knew the answer(s) definitively prior to getting to the statements? If so, could you please provide a PQID or OG page and question number? I expect a certain amount of preparation to some DS questions, but I cannot think of one off the top of my head in which I am looking to do nothing more than confirm what I know must be the answer(s).

Thank you.

- Andrew
GMAT Club Bot
Re: User's self-made question   [#permalink] 29 Nov 2019, 16:30
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