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V05-07

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The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single impassioned constituent may make a lawmaker change his opinion, whereas a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm.

A. a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm
B. only alarm is caused by a half-dozen banded together
C. only alarm has been caused by a half-dozen banded together
D. a half-dozen banded together only cause him alarm
E. a half-dozen have caused him only alarm when banded together
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Official Solution:

The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single impassioned constituent may make a lawmaker change his opinion, whereas a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm.

A. a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm
B. only alarm is caused by a half-dozen banded together
C. only alarm has been caused by a half-dozen banded together
D. a half-dozen banded together only cause him alarm
E. a half-dozen have caused him only alarm when banded together

The noun half-dozen, though it refers to a collection of six discrete things or people, is grammatically singular. Any verbs that take it as their antecedent, then, must also be singular. This sentence also tests correct verb form, which should be simple present tense because the sentence refers to facts that are generally true. The sentence is correct as written.
  1. The noun half-dozen agrees with the verb causes, and the correct simple present tense is used to describe facts generally believed to be true.
  2. Verb tense is correct in this option, but the phrasing of the sentence is wordy and awkward.
  3. The verb form has been caused unnecessarily uses past perfect, and the word order is awkward.
  4. Cause does not agree with the singular a half-dozen.
  5. This option is awkward and wordy.

Answer: A
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Re: V05-07 [#permalink]

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Hi Bunuel,

Option 'A' has the word 'him', which refers to lawmaker. But the sentence says lawmaker's opinion. How can this use be correct ?

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Re: V05-07 [#permalink]

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New post 05 Nov 2014, 03:44
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:

The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single impassioned constituent may sway a lawmaker’s opinion, whereas a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm.

A. a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm
B. only alarm is caused by a half-dozen banded together
C. only alarm has been caused by a half-dozen banded together
D. a half-dozen banded together only cause him alarm
E. a half-dozen have caused him only alarm when banded together

The noun half-dozen, though it refers to a collection of six discrete things or people, is grammatically singular. Any verbs that take it as their antecedent, then, must also be singular. This sentence also tests correct verb form, which should be simple present tense because the sentence refers to facts that are generally true. The sentence is correct as written.
  1. The noun half-dozen agrees with the verb causes, and the correct simple present tense is used to describe facts generally believed to be true.
  2. Verb tense is correct in this option, but the phrasing of the sentence is wordy and awkward.
  3. The verb form has been caused unnecessarily uses past perfect, and the word order is awkward.
  4. Cause does not agree with the singular a half-dozen.
  5. This option is awkward and wordy.

Answer: A



Just a check: the highlighted portion is supposed to be Present Perfect Tense.

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Re: V05-07 [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jan 2015, 02:24
Shouldn't wordy and awkward be the last precedence...while option A uses him, there is no antecedent to him, so shouldn't B be the right answer


quote="earnit"]
Bunuel wrote:
Official Solution:

The idea behind the Personal Long Letter campaign is that a single impassioned constituent may sway a lawmaker’s opinion, whereas a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm.

A. a half-dozen banded together only causes him alarm
B. only alarm is caused by a half-dozen banded together
C. only alarm has been caused by a half-dozen banded together
D. a half-dozen banded together only cause him alarm
E. a half-dozen have caused him only alarm when banded together

The noun half-dozen, though it refers to a collection of six discrete things or people, is grammatically singular. Any verbs that take it as their antecedent, then, must also be singular. This sentence also tests correct verb form, which should be simple present tense because the sentence refers to facts that are generally true. The sentence is correct as written.
  1. The noun half-dozen agrees with the verb causes, and the correct simple present tense is used to describe facts generally believed to be true.
  2. Verb tense is correct in this option, but the phrasing of the sentence is wordy and awkward.
  3. The verb form has been caused unnecessarily uses past perfect, and the word order is awkward.
  4. Cause does not agree with the singular a half-dozen.
  5. This option is awkward and wordy.

Answer: A



Just a check: the highlighted portion is supposed to be Present Perfect Tense.[/quote]

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Re: V05-07 [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2015, 07:13
there is no antecedent for "him"

lawmaker’s opinion cannot be antecedent for him. I think A is wrong.

I chose B as it is best among worst.
Views please.

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Re: V05-07 [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2015, 08:58
rukna wrote:
there is no antecedent for "him"

lawmaker’s opinion cannot be antecedent for him. I think A is wrong.

I chose B as it is best among worst.
Views please.


This is something that i got wrong quite often before being corrected. Here the Lawmaker's opinion - Lawmakers's is in possessive case. and therefore the pronoun referring to it is also in possessive case. i.e. Him. It would be wrong to say 'he'.
example
Jivesh's Dad is a strong man. He goes to the gym. (he would refer to the dad).
Jivesh's Dad is a strong man. I know him well. ( Should refer to Jivesh)

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Re: V05-07 [#permalink]

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jiveshjuneja wrote:
rukna wrote:
there is no antecedent for "him"

lawmaker’s opinion cannot be antecedent for him. I think A is wrong.

I chose B as it is best among worst.
Views please.


This is something that i got wrong quite often before being corrected. Here the Lawmaker's opinion - Lawmakers's is in possessive case. and therefore the pronoun referring to it is also in possessive case. i.e. Him. It would be wrong to say 'he'.
example
Jivesh's Dad is a strong man. He goes to the gym. (he would refer to the dad).
Jivesh's Dad is a strong man. I know him well. ( Should refer to Jivesh)


No. Him cannot be correct. If anything, it should be 'his', which is the possessive form.
In any case you cannot refer to Jivesh without explicitly using his name, while using Jivesh's in the sentence. If you use 'his', it will point to Jivesh's. His dad is a strong man.
'Him' will always point to Dad.

+Kudos, if this helped! :lol:
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Re: V05-07 [#permalink]

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New post 09 Dec 2015, 03:55
I think this is a poor-quality question and I agree with explanation. I see what the question is testing but usage of 'him' made me pick other answer choice in the crunch of time.
The usage of 'him' appears incorrect.
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New post 15 Dec 2015, 19:01
Poor Quality question and poor explanation

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New post 20 Feb 2016, 17:15
I agree with the above said. the question is of poor quality. no antecedent for HIM is presented. all answer choices are flawed.

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Re: V05-07 [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2016, 04:35
Hi Expert,

I understand the usage of him in option A to refer to lawmaker is incorrect . Since him is not a possessive case pronoun the reference is incorrect.

Among all the option choices option B is the best.

Please comment.

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Re: V05-07 [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2016, 09:59
sahilmalhotra01 wrote:
Hi Expert,

I understand the usage of him in option A to refer to lawmaker is incorrect . Since him is not a possessive case pronoun the reference is incorrect.

Among all the option choices option B is the best.

Please comment.

Thanks
Sahil


Valid point - thank you. Question has been updated.

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New post 31 Jul 2016, 14:08
It seems the answer was not corrected. Please confirm whether A or B is the right answer after last comment

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New post 19 Aug 2016, 12:06
eduardo3487 wrote:
It seems the answer was not corrected. Please confirm whether A or B is the right answer after last comment


Yes, it was corrected. Notice that previously option A had " lawmaker's opinion". (v05-184881.html#p1438415). The possessive noun cannot be an antecedent of a subject pronoun, an object pronoun or a possessive pronoun . It was then changed to "lawmaker" - an object or subject noun CAN be the antecedent of a subject noun, an object pronoun or a possessive pronoun. The reason is: possessive nouns function as adjectives and hence are not good antecedents.

The answer is A as registered in the question bank.

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New post 17 Sep 2016, 20:19
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation. HI,
I have gone through the comments on 'Him' part and understood that the question has been modified, but I' confused on the usage of 'A half-dozen' as singular entity as when we say 'A number of people', it means 'Few People', while 'The Number' is of course singular. So, Does the usage of 'a half-dozen' not mean equivalent to 'few'. Please explain.
Thanks,
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New post 18 Sep 2016, 02:12
anchal25 wrote:
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation. HI,
I have gone through the comments on 'Him' part and understood that the question has been modified, but I' confused on the usage of 'A half-dozen' as singular entity as when we say 'A number of people', it means 'Few People', while 'The Number' is of course singular. So, Does the usage of 'a half-dozen' not mean equivalent to 'few'. Please explain.
Thanks,
Anchal


I am not sure whether I understood your doubt correctly:

"A half-dozen" is equivalent to "a few" - consider this: "...whereas a half-dozen few banded together only causes him alarm."

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New post 18 Sep 2016, 13:29
sayantanc2k wrote:
anchal25 wrote:
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation. HI,
I have gone through the comments on 'Him' part and understood that the question has been modified, but I' confused on the usage of 'A half-dozen' as singular entity as when we say 'A number of people', it means 'Few People', while 'The Number' is of course singular. So, Does the usage of 'a half-dozen' not mean equivalent to 'few'. Please explain.
Thanks,
Anchal


I am not sure whether I understood your doubt correctly:

"A half-dozen" is equivalent to "a few" - consider this: "...whereas a half-dozen few banded together only causes him alarm."



Thanks Expert! I understood your point. But, can you help with some link where i can read more about usage of 'few', 'a few', etc in terms of singular / plural.
Many Thanks! - Anc

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Re: V05-07 [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2016, 12:06
anchal25 wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
anchal25 wrote:
I think this is a high-quality question and I agree with explanation. HI,
I have gone through the comments on 'Him' part and understood that the question has been modified, but I' confused on the usage of 'A half-dozen' as singular entity as when we say 'A number of people', it means 'Few People', while 'The Number' is of course singular. So, Does the usage of 'a half-dozen' not mean equivalent to 'few'. Please explain.
Thanks,
Anchal


I am not sure whether I understood your doubt correctly:

"A half-dozen" is equivalent to "a few" - consider this: "...whereas a half-dozen few banded together only causes him alarm."



Thanks Expert! I understood your point. But, can you help with some link where i can read more about usage of 'few', 'a few', etc in terms of singular / plural.
Many Thanks! - Anc


Unfortunately I do not recall any material that elaborates such uses. You may ask the GMAT tutors from various GMAT coaching schools whether they have something of this sort.

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Re: V05-07 [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2017, 16:41
Are we sure that "a half-dozen" requires a singular? Consider this example: "Many of our team's players are out of the lineup today. A half dozen has fallen ill with the flu" may be technically correct but would never be used over "have fallen."

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Re: V05-07   [#permalink] 29 Aug 2017, 16:41

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