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V05-19

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V05-19 [#permalink]

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Although quite powerful in his time, the 16th century Russian czar Ivan the Terrible seems to us as a remote and barely visible historical figure.

A. to us as a remote and barely visible historical figure
B. to us to be as a remote and barely visible figure of history
C. to us a remote and barely visible figure of history
D. to us a remote and barely visible historical figure
E. to us to be a remote and barely visible historical figure
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Although quite powerful in his time, the 16th century Russian czar Ivan the Terrible seems to us as a remote and barely visible historical figure.

A. to us as a remote and barely visible historical figure
B. to us to be as a remote and barely visible figure of history
C. to us a remote and barely visible figure of history
D. to us a remote and barely visible historical figure
E. to us to be a remote and barely visible historical figure

This sentence tests both the use of the word as and the ability to recognize concise constructions. The word as means in the capacity of, and is therefore not necessary to the meaning of this sentence. In fact, the word makes the sentence unnecessarily wordy, as do several of the incorrect answer choices.
  1. As in this option makes the sentence unnecessarily wordy.
  2. The words to be are redundant, and the word as is unnecessary; also, the phrase figure of history is wordy.
  3. Figure of history is wordy and unnecessary.
  4. The unnecessary word as has been eliminated, and the phrase barely visible historical figure is appropriately concise.
  5. The words to be are redundant and unnecessary.

Answer: D
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Re: V05-19 [#permalink]

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New post 05 Nov 2014, 03:20
Why usage of "as" declared as redundant when it clear the ambiguity that the Czar is not being compared to a remote historical figure but rather in capacity/role/function of a remote historical figure.

I think usage of 'as' is required and cannot be shunned as redundant.

Please Let me know if i am wrong or if there is an actual flaw here.

Thank you.

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Re: V05-19 [#permalink]

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New post 27 Dec 2014, 18:56
earnit wrote:
Why usage of "as" declared as redundant when it clear the ambiguity that the Czar is not being compared to a remote historical figure but rather in capacity/role/function of a remote historical figure.

I think usage of 'as' is required and cannot be shunned as redundant.

Please Let me know if i am wrong or if there is an actual flaw here.

Thank you.


I was questioning the same thing, but I believe "seems" is sufficient. Seems by itself indicates a comparison, so "as" would be redundant.

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Re: V05-19 [#permalink]

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New post 28 Dec 2014, 04:36
Although quite powerful in his time, the 16th century Russian czar Ivan the Terrible seems to us as a remote and barely visible historical figure.

Good tricky question :
I have done it in a different way , kindly clarify me if you find it wrong.

Things to catch
1) Active/passive voice (historical figure/ figure of history)
2) As usage is wordy not wrong.

A. to us as a remote and barely visible historical figure : correct just wordy so Incorrect
B. to us to be as a remote and barely visible figure of history : Incorrect (prefer active over passive)
C. to us a remote and barely visible figure of history : Incorrect (Passive)
D. to us a remote and barely visible historical figure : Correct and concise
E. to us to be a remote and barely visible historical figure : Incorrect (wrong usage of 'to be' )

Regards
SG :wink:

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Re: V05-19 [#permalink]

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New post 15 Sep 2015, 11:15
I think this the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate. When do you include "to be" after seems and when do you not?

I found the following in a google search (the bottom example uses "to be" with a noun following):

Ann seemed upset this morning.

Your friend seems very nice.

(English Grammar In Use by Raymond Murphy)

The baby seems (to be) hungry.

(Practical English Usage by Michael Swan)

A thin person seems (to be) taller than he really is.

(Times-Chambers Learners' Dictionary)

They seem to be very honest people.

(The Good English Handbook by Rodney Martin)

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Re: V05-19 [#permalink]

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New post 17 Sep 2015, 04:29
I am going to post a moderator note pqhai

Quote:
Although quite powerful in his time, the 16th century Russian czar Ivan the Terrible seems to us as a remote and barely visible historical figure.

* to us as a remote and barely visible historical figure
Wrong. SEEMS + AS --> wrong idiom. ("SEEM AS IF" is ok)

* to us to be as a remote and barely visible figure of history
Wrong. SEEM + TO BE + AS --> wrong idiom

* to us a remote and barely visible figure of history
Wrong. Change meaning. "figure of history" differs from "historical figure".

* to us a remote and barely visible historical figure
Correct. Idiom: SEEMS TO X Y (without AS; like "Consider X Y)

* to us to be a remote and barely visible historical figure
Wrong. "SEEM + TO BE + noun" is suspect. (Please note: I do NOT say it's wrong) Why? Because "to be" means "in the future", thus the meaning is like "X seems to us to be Y" <-- At this moment, X does not seem like Y, but will be Y in the future. The meaning is vague.

Hope it helps.

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Re: V05-19 [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2016, 22:58
Can any body tell me why A is wrong I suppose that here czar is a symbolic of something and yes I agree that seems+as+a is incorrect use of ideom but as cannot be omitted according to me and D option is making a completely different meaning

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Re: V05-19 [#permalink]

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suramya26 wrote:
Can any body tell me why A is wrong I suppose that here czar is a symbolic of something and yes I agree that seems+as+a is incorrect use of ideom but as cannot be omitted according to me and D option is making a completely different meaning


"As" must be omitted as a matter of fact since "seems" is used. Compare with this simpler example:

That man seems as strange to us ... wrong.
That man seems strange to us.... correct.

I do not see any grammatical error (or change in meaning) with the second sentence.

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New post 29 Nov 2016, 03:00
Excuse me, but I cannot believe someone actually says seem to be suggests a sense of in the future. How can anyone do this? I seem to be the only person who knows the answer. Are you saying I don't know yet but I will in the future? Would the moderator not come out and say something? Thank you very much!

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V05-19 [#permalink]

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New post 01 Dec 2016, 07:32
14razy wrote:
Excuse me, but I cannot believe someone actually says seem to be suggests a sense of in the future. How can anyone do this? I seem to be the only person who knows the answer. Are you saying I don't know yet but I will in the future? Would the moderator not come out and say something? Thank you very much!


Sorry, your query is not clear. Do you have a question or disagreement about the OA or OE?

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Re: V05-19 [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jan 2017, 21:08
Sorry, I wasn't referring to answer choice C in comparison to D. I was just surprised to see that someone actually believes that "seem to be” means "going to seem“ simply because infinitive (to+v) implies a future tense. By that logic, a sentence that goes like " I seem to be the only one that knows what's happened" means "I don't know yet what's happened, but I will ". Speaking of which, I have asked a lot of people to compare C and D, and they all agree that D is no different than E. "This seems to me to be an enormous change" among similar uses appears in the British National Corpus. If GMAT really loves concision that much, the correct answer is D. I doubt on a test day, people will encounter such a question that make or break on concision. Thank you for your clarification for my other questions.

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New post 20 May 2017, 11:48
I think this the explanation isn't clear enough, please elaborate. Why can't you use "as" in one of its prepositional form that Manhattaan guide calls Equation Form?

For example: I think of you as my friend (= you are my friend)

Ivan the terrible seems to us as x (Ivan the terrible is x)

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Re: V05-19 [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2017, 09:00
One would not say that something "seems barely visible." One would say that something "is barely visible". Because when something is barely visible, it barely makes an impression and "seems" doesn't applies.

I'm very disappointed in the verbal items from gmatclub. The math items are outstanding.

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Re: V05-19   [#permalink] 29 Aug 2017, 09:00
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