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Waller: If there were really such a thing as extrasensory perception,

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Waller: If there were really such a thing as extrasensory perception,  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2019, 10:01
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A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

33% (02:02) correct 67% (01:56) wrong based on 126 sessions

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Waller: If there were really such a thing as extrasensory perception, it would generally be accepted by the public since anyone with extrasensory powers would be able to convince the general public of its existence by clearly demonstrating those powers. Indeed, anyone who was recognized to have such powers would achieve wealth and renown.

Chin: It’s impossible to demonstrate anything to the satisfaction of all skeptics. So long as the cultural elite remains closed-minded to the possibility of extrasensory perception, the popular media reports, and thus public opinion, will always be biased in favor of such skeptics.

Waller’s and Chin’s statements commit them to disagreeing on whether

(A) extrasensory perception is a real phenomenon

(B) extrasensory perception, if it were a real phenomenon, could be demonstrated to the satisfaction of all skeptics

(C) skeptics about extrasensory perception have a weak case

(D) the failure of the general public to believe in extrasensory perception is good evidence against its existence

(E) the general public believes that extrasensory perception is a real phenomenon
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Re: Waller: If there were really such a thing as extrasensory perception,  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2019, 10:53
1
Hovkial wrote:
Waller: If there were really such a thing as extrasensory perception, it would generally be accepted by the public since anyone with extrasensory powers would be able to convince the general public of its existence by clearly demonstrating those powers. Indeed, anyone who was recognized to have such powers would achieve wealth and renown.

Chin: It’s impossible to demonstrate anything to the satisfaction of all skeptics. So long as the cultural elite remains closed-minded to the possibility of extrasensory perception, the popular media reports, and thus public opinion, will always be biased in favor of such skeptics.

Waller’s and Chin’s statements commit them to disagreeing on whether

(A) extrasensory perception is a real phenomenon

(B) extrasensory perception, if it were a real phenomenon, could be demonstrated to the satisfaction of all skeptics

(C) skeptics about extrasensory perception have a weak case

(D) the failure of the general public to believe in extrasensory perception is good evidence against its existence

(E) the general public believes that extrasensory perception is a real phenomenon


This is a complex argument. It is amenable to the usual "Premise-Conclusion" approach, but one must also combine this approach with a related approach that takes meaning and context into account.

The protagonists in this argument - Waller (W) and Chin (C) - are discussing somewhat related topics but are not in fact, responding to the same points in the argument. The subject of the argument is "extrasensory perception" (ESP). W presents reasons why ESP is not accepted to the public. It is not accepted because (a) a person with ESP powers should be able to demonstrate those powers to the public, and (b) if such a person with ESP powers existed, then they would become rich and famous. The main implication of W's argument is that ESP is not accepted by the public because noone has been able to demonstrate it and that noone who supposedly had such powers has become rich and famous for having such powers.

On the other hand, C suggests entirely different points. C does not even directly address the lines of argument by W. Instead, C points fingers at certain groups of people for supposedly dismissing phenomena such as ESP. According to C, the reasons for people not accepting phenomena such as ESP - the groups designated as "skeptics" - have to do with these groups certain inherent characteristics. C suggests that these characteristics include belonging to culturally "elite" groups who, according to C, impose their non-acceptance on others such as the popular media and the public.

Thus, we see that while W makes rational arguments about why ESP is not accepted by the public, C faults certain groups of people for supposedly negative internal characteristics that prevent people from accepting ESP.

Once we understand the main point of the disagreement, it becomes easier to isolate the correct answer choice. Answer choice (D) suggests that the fact that the public has not accepted ESP must be good enough proof that it does not exist.

W made the same point. W suggested that ESP is not accepted because the public has not been shown any proof of its existence. C suggested instead that we should blame "skeptics" and "culturally elite" people for their "closemindedness". Thus, W and C disagree about the reasons for the public's non-acceptance of ESP.

Since answer choice (D) zeroes in to this main point of disagreement, (D) is the correct choice.
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Re: Waller: If there were really such a thing as extrasensory perception,  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2019, 01:36
could anyone please explain why B is incorrect?
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Re: Waller: If there were really such a thing as extrasensory perception,  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2019, 03:49
I was confused between B and D.
Can anyone explain B

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Re: Waller: If there were really such a thing as extrasensory perception,  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2019, 04:08
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rahul0909 wrote:
could anyone please explain why B is incorrect?


B is extreme
It says “all” but waller is not even talking about all skeptics, he has given 2 points about the legitimacy of the powers

All- comprises of many aspects, but here the argument is constructed by waller on 2 points and majorly over show off of powers.

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Re: Waller: If there were really such a thing as extrasensory perception,  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2019, 14:57
rahul0909 wrote:
could anyone please explain why B is incorrect?


(B) is incorrect because it does not fully capture the main points of the argument.

W's main point is that if ESP were a real phenomenon, then its advocates would have successfully demonstrated its existence by convincing the public. Furthermore, these advocates would also have become rich and famous. W implies that since neither of these has happened, ESP is a not a real phenomenon.

C's makes different points. C blames certain groups for being closed-minded and points fingers at parties such as the media for supposedly demonstrating bias against ESP.

Choice (B) does not address W's points. It also misses the main point of the disagreement and only addresses a point made by C. Hence (B) is incorrect.
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Re: Waller: If there were really such a thing as extrasensory perception,   [#permalink] 23 Sep 2019, 14:57
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