GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 24 Apr 2019, 21:29

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

When mercury-vapor streetlights are used in areas inhabited by insect

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
Director
Director
User avatar
V
Joined: 12 Feb 2015
Posts: 805
Premium Member CAT Tests
When mercury-vapor streetlights are used in areas inhabited by insect  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Jun 2018, 09:04
jennpt wrote:
Hi CAMANISHPARMAR

You asked me to weigh in on this one so I will give you my thoughts. There are already some great explanations above.

Basically, we are looking for something that describes why replacing these lights is going to be a BIG PROBLEM for the bats.
It needs to be a life-threatening problem, because the argument says the change will likely result in a population decline. Population decline means existing bats die off and/or the next generations of bats are smaller.

What could cause such a thing?
Hmm, 2 big categories come to mind: a shortage of any of the essentials a bat needs to survive (food, nesting grounds, etc), or the presence of a killer such as a disease or a predator. (A natural disaster would be another option, though I don't foresee that coming into play here.)

So I could go for any answer that gives me a shortage of essentials or the presence of a killer.

For best results, we have this all in mind BEFORE we go shopping through the answer choices for an answer that meets our needs.

No answer choices give us a killer. And only one of our answer choices could lead to a shortage of essentials. D describes that bats are going to be working way harder than before to find enough food to eat, and as a result, they're going to suddenly need more food. If they can't find that additional food, they will die ... and/or not be able to feed the same number of baby bats as before, thus reducing the next generation.

It is not 100% sure that they won't be able to find additional food, but as GMATNinja and dave13 have mentioned, 1) we don't have to be 100% sure (the question says "likely"), and 2) there is a finite existing insect population. It's reasonable to envision that there will not be enough insects to feed the bats' increased appetite.

Let me know if this helps.


jennpt - Thanks for taking the time out for giving your inputs. I appreciate the essence of your post.

I just checked the OG explanation:-
(D) Correct. Since there will be no local concentrations of flying insects around Greenville streetlights
after the change, the bats will most likely have more trouble getting enough to eat, and that their local population will therefore fall.

I think it is supposed to be interpreted in a very simple manner, i.e. some thing which was easily available will no longer be easily available, that's it!! The Bats will have to search more, and that means more energy is consumed. Already they are hungry as the food source is not easily available, more hunger due to energy usage makes things worse for Bats and maybe that's why the bats will starve. As you rightly pointed out the author used subtle language here, "1) we don't have to be 100% sure (the question says "likely")".....and just find one reason to answer why the Bat population MIGHT go down?.....shouldn't this interpretation be sufficient to choose D!!
_________________
"Please hit :thumbup: +1 Kudos if you like this post" :student_man:

_________________
Manish :geek:

"Only I can change my life. No one can do it for me"
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Oct 2016
Posts: 50
Location: India
GMAT 1: 710 Q49 V38
GPA: 3.61
CAT Tests
Re: When mercury-vapor streetlights are used in areas inhabited by insect  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Apr 2019, 12:49
Which of the following most logically completes the argument below?

When mercury-vapor streetlights are used in areas inhabited by insect-eating bats, the bats feed almost exclusively around the lights, because the lights attract flying insects. In Greenville, the mercury-vapor streetlights are about to be replaced with energy-saving sodium streetlights, which do not attract insects. This change is likely to result in a drop in the population of insect-eating bats in Greenville, since __________.

(A) the bats do not begin to hunt until after sundown


What is wrong with option (A) here? If they don't begin to hunt till the sun is set and at night they are not going to get a concentration of flying insects, can't we say they will starve and hence the population is likely to reduce?
GMAT Club Bot
Re: When mercury-vapor streetlights are used in areas inhabited by insect   [#permalink] 14 Apr 2019, 12:49

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 22 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

When mercury-vapor streetlights are used in areas inhabited by insect

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.