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With + noun + ing

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With + noun + ing  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2018, 11:30
With the cost of wireless service plummeting in the last year and mobile phones becoming increasingly common, many people are now using their mobile phones to make calls across a wide region at night and on weekends, when numerous wireless companies provide unlimited airtime for a relatively small monthly fee.


I read an article by Mike that concluded -
If you drop verb ing ( participle) in these kind of construction and if sentence makes sense, the use of with +noun + ing is correct. But in the above correct version of a gmat prep question, this logic is not working. If we drop *plummenting*, sentence does not make sense.

What is the gap in my understanding?

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Re: With + noun + ing  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2018, 20:55
Could you post the question, please. There might be a possibility that all other options start with the same construction or ther other choices were 100% wrong grammatically and meaning wise.
Thanks!

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Re: With + noun + ing  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2018, 02:34
vaibhav1221 wrote:
Could you post the question, please. There might be a possibility that all other options start with the same construction or ther other choices were 100% wrong grammatically and meaning wise.
Thanks!
Because of wireless service costs plummeting in the last year, and as mobile phones are increasingly common, many people now using their mobile phones to make calls across a wide region at night and on weekends, when numerous wireless companies provide unlimited airtime for a relatively small monthly fee.
A. Because of wireless service costs plummeting in the last year, and as mobile phones are increasingly common, many people
B. As the cost of wireless service plummeted in the last year and as mobile phones became increasingly common, many people
C. In the last year, with the cost of wireless service plummeting, and mobile phones have become increasingly common, there are many people
D. With the cost of wireless service plummeting in the last year and mobile phones becoming increasingly common, many people are
E. While the cost of wireless service has plummeted in the last year and mobile phones are increasingly common, many people are
Posted from my mobile device




Agreed that other options have concrete errors but we should always learn something from OA.
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Re: With + noun + ing  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2018, 13:50
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pinthuri2 wrote:
With the cost of wireless service plummeting in the last year and mobile phones becoming increasingly common, many people are now using their mobile phones to make calls across a wide region at night and on weekends, when numerous wireless companies provide unlimited airtime for a relatively small monthly fee.


I read an article by Mike that concluded -
If you drop verb ing ( participle) in these kind of construction and if sentence makes sense, the use of with +noun + ing is correct. But in the above correct version of a gmat prep question, this logic is not working. If we drop *plummenting*, sentence does not make sense.

What is the gap in my understanding?

Sent from my ONEPLUS A3003 using GMAT Club Forum mobile app

Hi pinthuri2!

Happy to help :-) Here's the article that you're referring to:


And here's the relevant part of the article, describing this test:

Quote:
One way to tell the difference is to imagine the sentence without the participle phrase, just “with” + [noun]. If the sentence still makes perfect sense in this form, then the participle was purely descriptive, we are in Case II, and the use of the “with” + [noun] + [participle] structure is perfectly legitimate. If we drop the participle, and suddenly after the word “with” we have an unconnected noun that has no obvious relationship to the rest of the sentence, then the participle was providing an important action, we are in Case I, and the use of the “with” + [noun] + [participle] structure is not acceptable.


The idea is that if we drop the participle, the sentence does not have to still have the same meaning, or even really fully make sense on its own -- it just needs to be somewhat cohesive, meaning that the first noun needs to have some degree of relevance to the sentence. In your example, if we drop the participle, we have:

Quote:
With the cost of wireless service and mobile phones becoming increasingly common, many people are now using their mobile phones to make calls across a wide region at night and on weekends, when numerous wireless companies provide unlimited airtime for a relatively small monthly fee.


Now you're right, this isn't a perfect sentence, but it does "make sense" in the way that Mike is talking about, and if you read the other examples that Mike provides, they are similarly imperfect. The "cost of wireless service" does have an obvious relationship to "many people using their mobile phones". So this puts it in the realm of Case II, which is legitimate. There are actually two participles here, so if we drop both of them, we get:

Quote:
With the cost of wireless service and mobile phones, many people are now using their mobile phones to make calls across a wide region at night and on weekends, when numerous wireless companies provide unlimited airtime for a relatively small monthly fee.


Again, this sentence isn't perfect, but it does "make sense" -- of course "mobile phones" are relevant to "many people now using their mobile phones" as well. So we can conclude that [with]+[noun]+[participle] is used correctly here.

An example of a sentence that would not make sense would be:

Quote:
With ice cream, many people are now using their mobile phones to make calls across a wide region at night and on weekends, when numerous wireless companies provide unlimited airtime for a relatively small monthly fee.


There is no clear connection between ice cream and "many people using mobile phones". So if the sentence instead sounded something like this, we would conclude that the [with]+[noun]+[participle] structure is not used correctly.

I hope that helps! :-)
-Carolyn
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Re: With + noun + ing  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2018, 22:29
Thanks a lot for your detailed response. Much appreciated.
I read the article again with this line in mind - idea is that if we drop the participle, the sentence does not have to still have the same meaning, or even really fully make sense on its own -- it just needs to be somewhat cohesive, meaning that the first noun needs to have some degree of relevance to the sentence. Now I am absolutely clear about it.
Thanks again.
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Re: With + noun + ing &nbs [#permalink] 16 Aug 2018, 22:29
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