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A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person

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A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2017, 22:46
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A
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  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

54% (01:47) correct 46% (01:28) wrong based on 94 sessions

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A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person’s hand and matching the information obtained from the same with the information stored in the system. However, recent laboratory tests have shown that the software recognized and authenticated people whose information in the system was stored before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema, a syndrome that is associated with pain and peeling on the palms and soles of the feet, which even leads to a loss of fingerprints. Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.

Which of the following would be most helpful to evaluate the argument?

A- Whether the laboratory tests checked for correlation between other possible information gained from hand scans such as the length, width and thickness of the hand, fingers and joints
B- Whether the people suffering from the syndrome were at an initial stage of the disease when the peeling of the skin is mostly limited to the feet
C- Whether people currently suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema are likely to be authenticated by other security software such as facial and voice recognition software
D- Whether the software can be hacked by replicating features such as temperature and curvature of the hand
E- Whether the software alternatively uses foot prints to authenticate people

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Re: A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 01:11
Why B?
Doesn't C sound more plausible?
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Re: A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 02:31
A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person???s hand and matching the information obtained from the same with the information stored in the system. However, recent laboratory tests have shown that the software recognized and authenticated people whose information in the system was stored before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema, a syndrome that is associated with pain and peeling on the palms and soles of the feet, which even leads to a loss of fingerprints. Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.

Which of the following would be most helpful to evaluate the argument?

A- Whether the laboratory tests checked for correlation between other possible information gained from hand scans such as the length, width and thickness of the hand, fingers and joints
B- Whether the people suffering from the syndrome were at an initial stage of the disease when the peeling of the skin is mostly limited to the feet

Why is B right?
I was stuck between A and B.

A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person???s hand and matching the information obtained from the same with the information stored in the system --> people who got therapy started to suffer from something that WOULD EVEN lead to loss of handprint --> so the machine uses something else to authenticate (' Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication') --> My guess was A - as the database may have other information related to the hand it may not JUST use fingerprints but LIKELY to use to something else
Now, B mentions something about the syndrome affecting feet - doesn't comment on how we could better evaluate the machine. Also, it is in the initial stages of peeling, it wouldn't affect the hands anyway. Why is the machine likely to scan with something other than handprints, then? Even it did - it would be hard to see why the machine would use feet to scan - I mean it is too far to assume (fingerprints would still be intact!)Why is this right?
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Re: A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 02:42
authenticated people whose information in the system was stored before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema, a syndrome that is associated with pain and peeling on the palms and soles of the feet, which even leads to a loss of fingerprints. Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.


Why is B right?
A - Whether the laboratory tests checked for correlation between other possible information gained from hand scans such as the length, width and thickness of the hand, fingers and joints - makes more sense as even if handprints or footprints may peel the scanner would use other existing information to scan BASED on the handprint.

B - Whether the people suffering from the syndrome were at an initial stage of the disease when the peeling of the skin is mostly limited to the feet: if their hands aren't peeling yet, the machine would be MORE likely, not less likely to use simple finger prints. And we had to understand why the machine IS LIKELY TO BE using something else to scan (other than handprints). Also, the far - out assumption that feet would be used to scan is hard to believe; considering their skin is peeling off from those as well, in turn making harder to scan via footprint as well:(

Would be glad to hear the reasoning on this!
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A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 03:03
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Premise 1: A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person’s hand and matching the information obtained from the same with the information stored in the system.

Premise 2: However, recent laboratory tests have shown that the software recognized and authenticated people whose information in the system was stored before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema,a syndrome that is associated with pain and peeling on the palms and soles of the feet, which even leads to a loss of fingerprints.

Conclusion: Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.

Summary of Argument:
Person's hand is used for matching information. Tests was carried for people before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema, and they were authenticated people as per the information stored in the system..
This disease chemotherapy-induced acral erythema has peeling issue on the palms and soles of feet. So, they are questioning the software. We need to evalute the disease being in initial stage was it effecting hand or not? Or is it limited to feet only?

A- Whether the laboratory tests checked for correlation between other possible information gained from hand scans such as the length, width and thickness of the hand, fingers and joints

B- Whether the people suffering from the syndrome were at an initial stage of the disease when the peeling of the skin is mostly limited to the feet



Madhavi1990 wrote:
authenticated people whose information in the system was stored before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema, a syndrome that is associated with pain and peeling on the palms and soles of the feet, which even leads to a loss of fingerprints. Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.


Why is B right?
A - Whether the laboratory tests checked for correlation between other possible information gained from hand scans such as the length, width and thickness of the hand, fingers and joints - makes more sense as even if handprints or footprints may peel the scanner would use other existing information to scan BASED on the handprint.

B - Whether the people suffering from the syndrome were at an initial stage of the disease when the peeling of the skin is mostly limited to the feet: if their hands aren't peeling yet, the machine would be MORE likely, not less likely to use simple finger prints. And we had to understand why the machine IS LIKELY TO BE using something else to scan (other than handprints). Also, the far - out assumption that feet would be used to scan is hard to believe; considering their skin is peeling off from those as well, in turn making harder to scan via footprint as well:(

Would be glad to hear the reasoning on this!
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Re: A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 03:28
nickrocks wrote:
Premise 1: A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person’s hand and matching the information obtained from the same with the information stored in the system.

Premise 2: However, recent laboratory tests have shown that the software recognized and authenticated people whose information in the system was stored before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema,a syndrome that is associated with pain and peeling on the palms and soles of the feet, which even leads to a loss of fingerprints.

Conclusion: Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.

Summary of Argument:
Person's hand is used for matching information. Tests was carried for people before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema, and they were authenticated people as per the information stored in the system..
This disease chemotherapy-induced acral erythema has peeling issue on the palms and soles of feet. So, they are questioning the software. We need to evalute the disease being in initial stage was it effecting hand or not? Or is it limited to feet only?

A- Whether the laboratory tests checked for correlation between other possible information gained from hand scans such as the length, width and thickness of the hand, fingers and joints

B- Whether the people suffering from the syndrome were at an initial stage of the disease when the peeling of the skin is mostly limited to the feet



Madhavi1990 wrote:
authenticated people whose information in the system was stored before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema, a syndrome that is associated with pain and peeling on the palms and soles of the feet, which even leads to a loss of fingerprints. Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.


Why is B right?
A - Whether the laboratory tests checked for correlation between other possible information gained from hand scans such as the length, width and thickness of the hand, fingers and joints - makes more sense as even if handprints or footprints may peel the scanner would use other existing information to scan BASED on the handprint.

B - Whether the people suffering from the syndrome were at an initial stage of the disease when the peeling of the skin is mostly limited to the feet: if their hands aren't peeling yet, the machine would be MORE likely, not less likely to use simple finger prints. And we had to understand why the machine IS LIKELY TO BE using something else to scan (other than handprints). Also, the far - out assumption that feet would be used to scan is hard to believe; considering their skin is peeling off from those as well, in turn making harder to scan via footprint as well:(

Would be glad to hear the reasoning on this!


a syndrome that is associated with pain and peeling on the palms and soles of the feet, which even leads to a loss of fingerprints. Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.

Which of the following would be most helpful to evaluate the argument?


I'm still trying to understand this :( So what has foot peeling (indicated in B) got to do with "it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication" - it is saying it is likely to use something else - as per evaluation it could be something other than prints
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Re: A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 03:51
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Madhavi1990 wrote:
nickrocks wrote:
Premise 1: A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person’s hand and matching the information obtained from the same with the information stored in the system.

Premise 2: However, recent laboratory tests have shown that the software recognized and authenticated people whose information in the system was stored before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema,a syndrome that is associated with pain and peeling on the palms and soles of the feet, which even leads to a loss of fingerprints.

Conclusion: Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.

Summary of Argument:
Person's hand is used for matching information. Tests was carried for people before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema, and they were authenticated people as per the information stored in the system..
This disease chemotherapy-induced acral erythema has peeling issue on the palms and soles of feet. So, they are questioning the software. We need to evalute the disease being in initial stage was it effecting hand or not? Or is it limited to feet only?

A- Whether the laboratory tests checked for correlation between other possible information gained from hand scans such as the length, width and thickness of the hand, fingers and joints

B- Whether the people suffering from the syndrome were at an initial stage of the disease when the peeling of the skin is mostly limited to the feet



Madhavi1990 wrote:
authenticated people whose information in the system was stored before they recently started suffering from chemotherapy-induced acral erythema, a syndrome that is associated with pain and peeling on the palms and soles of the feet, which even leads to a loss of fingerprints. Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.


Why is B right?
A - Whether the laboratory tests checked for correlation between other possible information gained from hand scans such as the length, width and thickness of the hand, fingers and joints - makes more sense as even if handprints or footprints may peel the scanner would use other existing information to scan BASED on the handprint.

B - Whether the people suffering from the syndrome were at an initial stage of the disease when the peeling of the skin is mostly limited to the feet: if their hands aren't peeling yet, the machine would be MORE likely, not less likely to use simple finger prints. And we had to understand why the machine IS LIKELY TO BE using something else to scan (other than handprints). Also, the far - out assumption that feet would be used to scan is hard to believe; considering their skin is peeling off from those as well, in turn making harder to scan via footprint as well:(

Would be glad to hear the reasoning on this!


a syndrome that is associated with pain and peeling on the palms and soles of the feet, which even leads to a loss of fingerprints. Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.

Which of the following would be most helpful to evaluate the argument?


I'm still trying to understand this :( So what has foot peeling (indicated in B) got to do with "it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication" - it is saying it is likely to use something else - as per evaluation it could be something other than prints



People having chemotherapy will have peeling in hand and feet. If it is only limited to feet as in point B then in that case hand won't be affected and software will work fine. That's what would have happened as per the arguments premise, people with chemotherapy were authorized as per the software and that's why wrong conclusion was taken in the end of the passage that finger prints of a person isn't used.
Just don't look at conclusion, check how that conclusion was reached using the argument. This is what we are evaluating not just the conclusion.
See, if this explanation makes sense now.
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A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2017, 10:01
Imo B
Conclusion of the argument : Therefore, it is likely that the security system does not use the finger-prints of a person as a metric for authentication.

Here we have to evaluate the argument .
The argument tells us that the software is using some other parameter apart from fingerprints .
For this to true we have to know the whether the disease is at initial level or advanced level .If it is at initial level then the conclusion falls apart that the software uses other parameters than fingerprints.
This can happen because at the initial level of the disease fingerprint will still be there .

--== Message from the GMAT Club Team ==--

THERE IS LIKELY A BETTER DISCUSSION OF THIS EXACT QUESTION.
This discussion does not meet community quality standards. It has been retired.


If you would like to discuss this question please re-post it in the respective forum. Thank you!

To review the GMAT Club's Forums Posting Guidelines, please follow these links: Quantitative | Verbal Please note - we may remove posts that do not follow our posting guidelines. Thank you.

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A new security software authenticates a person by scanning the person   [#permalink] 11 Jul 2017, 10:01
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