It is currently 18 Nov 2017, 18:54

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule,

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Apr 2009
Posts: 148

Kudos [?]: 28 [0], given: 0

Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2009, 00:27
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

54% (00:54) correct 46% (01:26) wrong based on 59 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, which forbids a court to consider evidence seized in violation of the defendant’s constitutional rights, has unduly hampered law-enforcement efforts. Even when the rights violation was a minor or purely technical one, turning on a detail of procedure rather than on the abrogation of some fundamental liberty, and even when it has been clear that the police officers were acting in good faith, the evidence obtained has been considered tainted under this rule and may not even by introduced. In consequence, defendants who were undoubtedly guilty have been set free, perhaps to steal, rape, or murder again.
5. The author of the passage above assumes all of the following EXCEPT:
(A) The constitutional rights of criminal defendants should be protected.
(B) Most cases in which the exclusionary rule has been invoked have involved purely technical violations of constitutional principles.
(C) The number of cases whose outcome has been affected by the exclusionary rule is significant.
(D) Some of the defendants set free under the exclusionary rule have been guilty of serious criminal offenses.
(E) Merely technical violations of the rules concerning evidence should be treated differently from deliberate assaults upon human rights.


Please explain the ans

Kudos [?]: 28 [0], given: 0

1 KUDOS received
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 01 May 2009
Posts: 106

Kudos [?]: 72 [1], given: 11

Re: CR doubt [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2009, 01:42
1
This post received
KUDOS
shrutisingh wrote:
Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, which forbids a court to consider evidence seized in violation of the defendant’s constitutional rights, has unduly hampered law-enforcement efforts. Even when the rights violation was a minor or purely technical one, turning on a detail of procedure rather than on the abrogation of some fundamental liberty, and even when it has been clear that the police officers were acting in good faith, the evidence obtained has been considered tainted under this rule and may not even by introduced. In consequence, defendants who were undoubtedly guilty have been set free, perhaps to steal, rape, or murder again.
5. The author of the passage above assumes all of the following EXCEPT:
(A) The constitutional rights of criminal defendants should be protected.
(B) Most cases in which the exclusionary rule has been invoked have involved purely technical violations of constitutional principles.
(C) The number of cases whose outcome has been affected by the exclusionary rule is significant.
(D) Some of the defendants set free under the exclusionary rule have been guilty of serious criminal offenses.
(E) Merely technical violations of the rules concerning evidence should be treated differently from deliberate assaults upon human rights.


Please explain the ans


Phew!! a lot of information.

As this is an EXCEPT question, my strategy is to find something in the ans choices that is out of scope and no where mentioned in the stimulus.

If you notice closely, option B talks about 'constitutional principles', but the stimulus talks about 'constitutional rights'.

So, even if the author assumes something on 'constitutional priciples', it will have no effect.

So IMO B is the right answer.

Apologies for not giving a more technical explanation.

Please do post the OA.

Kudos [?]: 72 [1], given: 11

1 KUDOS received
Director
Director
User avatar
Joined: 03 Jun 2009
Posts: 782

Kudos [?]: 918 [1], given: 56

Location: New Delhi
WE 1: 5.5 yrs in IT
Re: CR doubt [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2009, 02:25
1
This post received
KUDOS
My guess is B

(A) The constitutional rights of criminal defendants should be protected. -Evident from line "which forbids a court to consider evidence seized in violation of the defendant’s constitutional rights, has unduly hampered law-enforcement efforts."
(B) Most cases in which the exclusionary rule has been invoked have involved purely technical violations of constitutional principles. -Author has not mentioned anything related to this
(C) The number of cases whose outcome has been affected by the exclusionary rule is significant. -Evident from line "Even when the rights violation was a minor or purely technical one". If this had affected even the minor cases, that means it must had affected lot of cases.
(D) Some of the defendants set free under the exclusionary rule have been guilty of serious criminal offenses. -Evident from last line "defendants who were undoubtedly guilty have been set free, perhaps to steal, rape, or murder again."
(E) Merely technical violations of the rules concerning evidence should be treated differently from deliberate assaults upon human rights. -Evident from line "Even when the rights violation was a minor or purely technical one....". This means author is assuming that the new rule is fine with serious offenses, but implementing it for minor offenses is just too much to accept.
_________________

ISB 2011-12 thread | Ask ISB Alumni @ ThinkISB
All information related to Indian candidates and B-schools | Indian B-schools accepting GMAT scores
Self evaluation for Why MBA?

Kudos [?]: 918 [1], given: 56

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 15 Jun 2009
Posts: 151

Kudos [?]: 66 [0], given: 8

Re: CR doubt [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2009, 03:05
IMO C... oa PLZ

Kudos [?]: 66 [0], given: 8

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 17 Apr 2009
Posts: 148

Kudos [?]: 28 [0], given: 0

Re: CR doubt [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 14 Jul 2009, 03:42
OA is B.

Kudos [?]: 28 [0], given: 0

Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10146

Kudos [?]: 270 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Feb 2014, 06:59
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.

Kudos [?]: 270 [0], given: 0

Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 10146

Kudos [?]: 270 [0], given: 0

Premium Member
Re: Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Apr 2015, 12:26
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.

Kudos [?]: 270 [0], given: 0

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 24 May 2016
Posts: 171

Kudos [?]: 137 [0], given: 33

Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2016, 03:58
bigoyal wrote:
My guess is B

(A) The constitutional rights of criminal defendants should be protected. -Evident from line "which forbids a court to consider evidence seized in violation of the defendant’s constitutional rights, has unduly hampered law-enforcement efforts."
(B) Most cases in which the exclusionary rule has been invoked have involved purely technical violations of constitutional principles. -Author has not mentioned anything related to this
(C) The number of cases whose outcome has been affected by the exclusionary rule is significant. -Evident from line "Even when the rights violation was a minor or purely technical one". If this had affected even the minor cases, that means it must had affected lot of cases.
(D) Some of the defendants set free under the exclusionary rule have been guilty of serious criminal offenses. -Evident from last line "defendants who were undoubtedly guilty have been set free, perhaps to steal, rape, or murder again."
(E) Merely technical violations of the rules concerning evidence should be treated differently from deliberate assaults upon human rights. -Evident from line "Even when the rights violation was a minor or purely technical one....". This means author is assuming that the new rule is fine with serious offenses, but implementing it for minor offenses is just too much to accept.


bigoyal

In your discussion of option C, how can you logically go from "If this had affected even the minor cases..." to "...that means it must had affected lot of cases."?

This may or may not be the case.

Even if I chose option B, I was not able to find an irrefutable reason why option C is an assumption of the passage. It requires me to make a certain assumption on the author's intentions before I can say that it is an assumption of the passage.

Can anyone please give a solid reason why option C is an assumption of the passage?

Kudos [?]: 137 [0], given: 33

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Feb 2017
Posts: 39

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 0

Re: Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Apr 2017, 04:01
could anyone explain this passage ?

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 0

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 31 Jul 2014
Posts: 2

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 21

Re: Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule, [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Sep 2017, 13:35
how C is an assumption ?
Nowhere in the argument the author mentions anything about the number of crimes.
Confused...

Kudos [?]: 1 [0], given: 21

Re: Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule,   [#permalink] 23 Sep 2017, 13:35
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Although its purpose is laudable, the exclusionary rule,

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Moderators: GMATNinjaTwo, GMATNinja



GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.