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Although many may argue with my stress on the continuity

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Manager
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Joined: 09 Jan 2018
Posts: 58
Location: India
Concentration: Finance, Technology
GMAT 1: 680 Q50 V32
GPA: 4
Although many may argue with my stress on the continuity  [#permalink]

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New post 30 May 2018, 20:41
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Although many may argue with my stress on the continuity of the essential traits of American character and religion, few would question the thesis that our business institutions have reflected the constant emphasis in the American value system on individual achievement. From the earliest comments of foreign travellers down to the present, individuals have identified a strong materialistic bent as a characteristic American trait. The worship of the dollar, the desire to make a profit, the effort to get ahead through the accumulation of possessions, all have been credited to the egalitarian character of the society.

A study of the comments on American workers of various nineteenth-century foreign travellers reveals that most of these European writers, among whom were a number of socialists, concluded that social and economic democracy in America has an effect contrary to mitigating compensation for social status. American secular and religious values both have facilitated the ―triumph of American capitalism,‖ and fostered status striving.

The focus on equalitarianism and individual opportunity has also prevented the emergence of class consciousness among the lower classes. The absence of a socialist or labour party, and the historic weakness of American trade-unionism, appear to attest to the strength of values which depreciated a concern with class.

Although the American labour movement is similar to others in many respects, it differs from those of other stable democracies in ideology, class solidarity, tactics, organizational structure, and patterns of leadership behaviour. American unions are more conservative; they are more narrowly self-interested; their tactics are more militant; they are more decentralized in their collective bargaining; and they have more full-time salaried officials, who are on the whole much more highly paid. American unions have also organized a smaller proportion of the labour force than have unions in these other nations.

The growth of a large trade-union movement during the 1930s, together with the greater political involvement of labour organizations in the Democratic party, suggested to some that the day—long predicted by Marxists—was arriving in which the American working class would finally follow in the footsteps of its European brethren. Such changes in the structure of class relations seemed to these observers to reflect the decline of opportunity and the hardening of class lines. To them, such changes could not occur without modification in the traditional value system.

A close examination of the character of the American labour movement suggests that it, like American religious institutions, may be perceived as reflecting the basic values of the larger society. Although unions, like all other American institutions, have changed in various ways consistent with the growth of an urban industrial civilization, the essential traits of American trade unions, as of business corporations, may still be derived from key elements in the American value system.
1. If the claims made in the passage about American and foreign labour unions are correct, how would the unions be expected to react during a strike against a corporation?
A. American labour unions would be less likely than foreign unions to use violence against a corporation.
B. American labour unions would be more likely than foreign unions to use violence against a corporation.
C. American labour unions would be less likely than foreign unions to bargain with a corporation.
D. American labour unions would be more likely than foreign unions to bargain with a corporation.
E. American labour unions would be more likely than foreign unions to agree to the proposals of a corporation.



2. If a critic of the author‘s viewpoint brought up examples as a rebuttal to the passage, the existence of which of the following phenomena would most strongly challenge the information in the passage?
A. American union leaders who are highly paid to negotiate on behalf of workers
B. American labour organizations that avoid involvement in non-labour issues
C. American workers with a weak sense of group solidarity
D. American corporations that are more interested in helping people than in making a profit
E. The primary motive of American companies is to make profits



3. Based on the information given in the passage, which of the following is/are NOT true?
I. American society emphasizes class solidarity over individual achievement.
II. American unions are less interested in non-labour issues than unions in other democracies.
III. American labour organizations and American religious institutions share some of the same values.
A. I only
B. II only
C. II and III
D. I, II and III
E. None


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Joined: 13 May 2018
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Although many may argue with my stress on the continuity  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Mar 2019, 22:30
Got 2 out of the 3 right in 7 m 29 seconds including the passage reading.
I missed the question 3 and marked D. Could you kindly guide?
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努力の精神を養うこと (Fostering the spirit of Effort)

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Although many may argue with my stress on the continuity   [#permalink] 01 Mar 2019, 22:30
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Although many may argue with my stress on the continuity

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