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Each year red-winged blackbirds stop in a certain region of

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Each year red-winged blackbirds stop in a certain region of [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2009, 10:36
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A
B
C
D
E

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Each year red-winged blackbirds stop in a certain region of Midland Province on their
spring and fall migrations. In the fall, they eat a significant portion of the province’s
sunflower crop. This year Midland farmers sought permits to set out small amounts of
poisoned rice during the blackbirds’ spring stop in order to reduce the fall blackbird
population. Some residents voiced concern that the rice could threaten certain species of
rare migratory birds. Nevertheless, the wildlife agency approved the permits.
Which of the following, if true, most helps to justify the wildlife agency’s approval of the
permits, given the concerns voiced by some residents?

A. In the region where the red-winged blackbirds stop, they are the first birds to be
present in the spring.
B. The poison that farmers want to use does not kill birds but rather makes them
incapable of producing viable eggs.
C. Since rice is not raised in Midland Province, few species of birds native to the
province normally eat rice.
D. Without the permit, any farmers shown to have set out poison for the blackbirds
would be heavily fined.
E. The poison that farmers got approval to use has no taste or smell that would make
it detectable by birds.
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Re: Birds [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2009, 11:13
trainspotting wrote:
Each year red-winged blackbirds stop in a certain region of Midland Province on their spring and fall migrations. In the fall, they eat a significant portion of the province’s sunflower crop. This year Midland farmers sought permits to set out small amounts of poisoned rice during the blackbirds’ spring stop in order to reduce the fall blackbird
population. Some residents voiced concern that the rice could threaten certain species of rare migratory birds. Nevertheless, the wildlife agency approved the permits.
Which of the following, if true, most helps to justify the wildlife agency’s approval of thepermits, given the concerns voiced by some residents?

A. In the region where the red-winged blackbirds stop, they are the first birds to be present in the spring.
B. The poison that farmers want to use does not kill birds but rather makes them incapable of producing viable eggs.
C. Since rice is not raised in Midland Province, few species of birds native to the province normally eat rice.
D. Without the permit, any farmers shown to have set out poison for the blackbirds would be heavily fined.
E. The poison that farmers got approval to use has no taste or smell that would make it detectable by birds.


The complaint of residents is that this plan would harm other desirable migratory birds, so I guess the answer we're looking for is the one that would minimize or eliminate this harm.
At first glance, the best answer I see is (A), although it isn't a strong answer. It suggests that since the target birds are the first to migrate to the region, they will be the first to eat the poison, thus making the poisonous rice less available to other migratory birds. The lack of availability of poison would, therefore, minimize damage done to other species of migratory birds.

(B) This could still reduce the population of rare migratory birds.
(C) I think the chief concern is about MIGRATORY birds, NOT native birds, so this is a little out of scope.
(D) This does not minimize/downplay the potential harm done to rare migratory birds.
(E) This strengthens the concern that birds of all types (including other migratory birds) would be poisoned.

(A) isn't that strong or direct, but I think its still better than the other available answers.

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Re: Birds [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2009, 11:20
I too would go with the above explaination.

The passage talks about "certain species", that implies species other than red-winged blackbirds should also be included.
If A is true, the poison would have its maximum impact on the red-winged blackbirds, but little or no impact on other species.

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Re: Birds [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2009, 11:38
I would also go for A.

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Re: Birds [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2009, 12:23
A is the best choice.

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Re: Birds [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2009, 23:55
Me too with A .
whats the oa ?

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Re: Birds [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2009, 00:42
Why not B...It too signals that the population of blabk birds will be restricted by preventing them from reproducing and at the same time, it will not kill the endangered species.....
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Re: Birds [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2009, 00:58
trainspotting wrote:
Why not B...It too signals that the population of blabk birds will be restricted by preventing them from reproducing and at the same time, it will not kill the endangered species.....


What I found wrong with (B) is that even if the info is true, it still does not address the main concern of the residents. The main problem is that certain other species of birds may be harmed, including rare migratory populations. If these endangered species are unable to reproduce, then their population will dwindle and they will become even more rare/endangered. (B) does not specify that other species will be spared of the consequences (namely, sterilization) of the poison.

What's the OA?

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Re: Birds [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2009, 09:24
GMATaddict wrote:
trainspotting wrote:
Why not B...It too signals that the population of blabk birds will be restricted by preventing them from reproducing and at the same time, it will not kill the endangered species.....


What I found wrong with (B) is that even if the info is true, it still does not address the main concern of the residents. The main problem is that certain other species of birds may be harmed, including rare migratory populations. If these endangered species are unable to reproduce, then their population will dwindle and they will become even more rare/endangered. (B) does not specify that other species will be spared of the consequences (namely, sterilization) of the poison.

What's the OA?



Thanks GMATaddict...You made it very clear
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Re: Birds   [#permalink] 30 Jun 2009, 09:24
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Each year red-winged blackbirds stop in a certain region of

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