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GMAT Verbal vs GRE Verbal

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GMAT Verbal vs GRE Verbal [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2017, 05:16
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Could someone explain in detail the difference between GMAT verbal section and GRE verbal section
It would be helpful if the answer is from the sub section level till the bigger picture

P.S: Please answer with respect to preparation as well as exam pattern

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Re: GMAT Verbal vs GRE Verbal [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2017, 05:25
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Re: GMAT Verbal vs GRE Verbal [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2017, 17:28
Hi Nik96,

While the Verbal sections of the GMAT and GRE have some question types in common, the GRE places a much greater emphasis on vocabulary knowledge (and your ability to determine when to use certain words), whereas the GMAT is designed more to test your logic and critical-thinking skills. In the broader sense, the GRE also gives you 'easier' questions to deal with (relative to what you'll face on the GMAT) but gives you less time per question (this is true when comparing respective Quant sections as well). Thus, you have to be able to think quickly/correctly on the GRE to maximize your score on that Exam.

You can download free GMAT and GRE practice Exams through www.mba.com and www.gre.org, respectively.

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GMAT Verbal vs GRE Verbal [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2017, 18:32
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Nik96 wrote:
Could someone explain in detail the difference between GMAT verbal section and GRE verbal section
It would be helpful if the answer is from the sub section level till the bigger picture

P.S: Please answer with respect to preparation as well as exam pattern


Both the GRE and GMAT have similar Critical Reasoning and Reading Comprehension style questions.

However, the GRE tests your vocabulary and understanding of 2nd or 3rd meanings of common English words much more extensively. Some question types include omitting up to three words in a sentence or paragraph, and asking you to select words or groups of words that could be used interchangeably to produce a similar meaning. I scored a 170V on the GRE (99th percentile), and to prepare I highly recommend Manhattan Prep's books as well as their GRE Vocabulary flashcards. The ETS PowerPrep software is also the best option for mock GRE tests. When studying, I would take at least 10 minutes out of each study session and work on sets of 20 flashcards at a time until you can say the meaning of each word without much hesitation before moving on to the next set of 20.

The GMAT has the sentence correction question type which deals much more extensively with grammar. However, there are a few key rules that, if you master them, you can learn to systematically eliminate answers and find the correct choice confidently 90% of the time. Understanding the concept of parallelism, subject-verb agreement (whether it be amount or tense), the proper use of which & that, counting/amount words, and mastery of about 100 idioms will get you most of the way there. I scored a 45V on the GMAT (99th percentile), and while I used Manhattan Prep's materials, I also used the PowerScore trilogy (Reading Comprehension Bible, Critical Reasoning Bible, Sentence Correction Bible) which I think are the superior product. The PowerScore books give a very clear, systematic method to finding the correct answer which I found useful. Also, as with the GRE, use the official materials from GMAC for questions and the GMATprep software to simulate tests. Whether you go with PowerScore or Manhattan Prep, I would recommend that you actually physically write down the lists of most common idioms and routinely review your list.

For both tests, I recommend that you study 1-2 hours per day on weekdays and up to 4 hours per day on the days on the weekend while taking thorough notes on the material you read. Complete all questions and exercises in the prep books, whether they be Manhattan Prep or PowerScore, while also testing yourself three times a week on sets of 10-20 questions from the official material. Every time you finish a book, review all of your notes by making notes off of your notes on the material that did not stick strongly in your memory. And then every 3-5 weeks take a practice test to mark your progress. Finally, keep an error log of your mistakes and set aside 1-2 days every 2 weeks to review your mistakes and re-work problems that gave you trouble or review concepts that are still unclear. After about 3 months you can look at what types of questions you are missing in your error log as well as official tests and refocus your efforts to work more on your weaknesses.

Also, please take a look at the thread "The Ultimate Verbal Study Guide" under the GMAT Verbal Section of the forums.

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Re: GMAT Verbal vs GRE Verbal [#permalink]

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New post 22 Sep 2017, 00:24
XTOL wrote:
Nik96 wrote:
Could someone explain in detail the difference between GMAT verbal section and GRE verbal section
It would be helpful if the answer is from the sub section level till the bigger picture

P.S: Please answer with respect to preparation as well as exam pattern


Both the GRE and GMAT have similar Critical Reasoning and Reading Comprehension style questions.

However, the GRE tests your vocabulary and understanding of 2nd or 3rd meanings of common English words much more extensively. Some question types include omitting up to three words in a sentence or paragraph, and asking you to select words or groups of words that could be used interchangeably to produce a similar meaning. I scored a 170V on the GRE (99th percentile), and to prepare I highly recommend Manhattan Prep's books as well as their GRE Vocabulary flashcards. The ETS PowerPrep software is also the best option for mock GRE tests. When studying, I would take at least 10 minutes out of each study session and work on sets of 20 flashcards at a time until you can say the meaning of each word without much hesitation before moving on to the next set of 20.

The GMAT has the sentence correction question type which deals much more extensively with grammar. However, there are a few key rules that, if you master them, you can learn to systematically eliminate answers and find the correct choice confidently 90% of the time. Understanding the concept of parallelism, subject-verb agreement (whether it be amount or tense), the proper use of which & that, counting/amount words, and mastery of about 100 idioms will get you most of the way there. I scored a 45V on the GMAT (99th percentile), and while I used Manhattan Prep's materials, I also used the PowerScore trilogy (Reading Comprehension Bible, Critical Reasoning Bible, Sentence Correction Bible) which I think are the superior product. The PowerScore books give a very clear, systematic method to finding the correct answer which I found useful. Also, as with the GRE, use the official materials from GMAC for questions and the GMATprep software to simulate tests. Whether you go with PowerScore or Manhattan Prep, I would recommend that you actually physically write down the lists of most common idioms and routinely review your list.

For both tests, I recommend that you study 1-2 hours per day on weekdays and up to 4 hours per day on the days on the weekend while taking thorough notes on the material you read. Complete all questions and exercises in the prep books, whether they be Manhattan Prep or PowerScore, while also testing yourself three times a week on sets of 10-20 questions from the official material. Every time you finish a book, review all of your notes by making notes off of your notes on the material that did not stick strongly in your memory. And then every 3-5 weeks take a practice test to mark your progress. Finally, keep an error log of your mistakes and set aside 1-2 days every 2 weeks to review your mistakes and re-work problems that gave you trouble or review concepts that are still unclear. After about 3 months you can look at what types of questions you are missing in your error log as well as official tests and refocus your efforts to work more on your weaknesses.

Also, please take a look at the thread "The Ultimate Verbal Study Guide" under the GMAT Verbal Section of the forums.



best book to prepare for gre ?suggest me some
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Re: GMAT Verbal vs GRE Verbal   [#permalink] 22 Sep 2017, 00:24
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