GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 22 Sep 2018, 02:24

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes of styles from

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

VP
VP
User avatar
Status: Been a long time guys...
Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 1226
Location: United States (NY)
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
GPA: 3.75
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes of styles from  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Oct 2012, 23:56
2
5
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

(N/A)

Question Stats:

84% (00:51) correct 16% (01:32) wrong based on 166 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes of styles from former eras; instead, designers of everything from cars to computer monitors have adopted a cornerless style of smooth surfaces and curves that is more ergonomic, conforming to the shape of the body rather than flaunting shape for its own sake.

A. more ergonomic, conforming to the shape of the body rather than flaunting shape

B. more ergonomic, conformed to the body's shape and not to flaunting shape

C. ergonomic, more conformed to the shape of the body and not to shape flaunted

D. ergonomic, conforming more to the body's shape rather than shape flaunted

E. ergonomic, conforming more to the shape of the body than flaunting shape


Please provide the proper explanation. Just the answer choice may help you in flaunting your knowledge to everyone but not others.
_________________

Prepositional Phrases Clarified|Elimination of BEING| Absolute Phrases Clarified
Rules For Posting
www.Univ-Scholarships.com

VP
VP
User avatar
Status: Been a long time guys...
Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 1226
Location: United States (NY)
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
GPA: 3.75
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2012, 00:45
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Jul 2012
Posts: 161
GMAT Date: 11-18-2012
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2012, 00:52
IMO 'A'

good question.
even i am waiting for an explanation. :-D
_________________

Thriving for CHANGE

VP
VP
User avatar
Status: Been a long time guys...
Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 1226
Location: United States (NY)
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
GPA: 3.75
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2012, 01:04
The reasons I think that the answer is not are:
1) more ergonomic-> there is no way to tell whether earlier also car was ergonomic.
2) also "conforming to the shape of the body rather than flaunting shape". Here the parallelism is being made between shape of the body and flaunting shape.
Shape of the body-noun
Flaunting shape- verb
Noun and verb can't be parallel.
_________________

Prepositional Phrases Clarified|Elimination of BEING| Absolute Phrases Clarified
Rules For Posting
www.Univ-Scholarships.com

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Jul 2012
Posts: 161
GMAT Date: 11-18-2012
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2012, 01:16
Marcab wrote:
The reasons I think that the answer is not are:
1) more ergonomic-> there is no way to tell whether earlier also car was ergonomic.
2) also "conforming to the shape of the body rather than flaunting shape". Here the parallelism is being made between shape of the body and flaunting shape.
Shape of the body-noun
Flaunting shape- verb
Noun and verb can't be parallel.


IMO Flaunting shape is not verb but i think its adjectival phrase.
where 'Flaunting' adjective describing noun 'shape'.
_________________

Thriving for CHANGE

VP
VP
User avatar
Status: Been a long time guys...
Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 1226
Location: United States (NY)
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
GPA: 3.75
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Oct 2012, 01:39
Well I'll still to it as a verb.
By the way, even if it were an adjective, then also it would be incorrect.
Reason: only noun and gerund can be parallel to a noun. Moreover, for an action noun, either an action noun or a complex gerund can be parallel. Since "flaunting shape" is none of the above, its incorrect.
_________________

Prepositional Phrases Clarified|Elimination of BEING| Absolute Phrases Clarified
Rules For Posting
www.Univ-Scholarships.com

Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4542
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Oct 2012, 07:52
1
Here two things are to be noted. A verb+ing word is called a present participle; it is a verbal and never a verb, when not proceeded by an auxiliary verb, such as is / are.

What is the role if verb+ ing word generally and especially in the case. A present participle is an adjectival, when placed at the start of the sentence modifying the noun, immediately after the modification is over, and an adverbial modifier, when placed elsewhere in the sentence, modifying the entire clause lying before or in effect, the gist of it. Here, therefore, the present participles conforming and flaunting are participle.
That the ing word has yet another role of a gerund, is another matter

The second point here is that about comparison: The comparator word ‘than’ is followed flaunting; it is clear, therefore, that the comparison is between flaunting and another similar participle, which in this case, is conforming; We can then see that the participle parallelism is well in place, because ergonomics is more x than y, where x is conforming and y is flaunting
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

VP
VP
User avatar
Status: Been a long time guys...
Joined: 03 Feb 2011
Posts: 1226
Location: United States (NY)
Concentration: Finance, Marketing
GPA: 3.75
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Oct 2012, 08:17
I am able to see now how e is correct logically and grammatically. But there is one doubt :isn't the construction in D, a more X than Y construction. As per this construction, body's shape and shape flaunted are both nouns and hence parallel to each other.
_________________

Prepositional Phrases Clarified|Elimination of BEING| Absolute Phrases Clarified
Rules For Posting
www.Univ-Scholarships.com

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 86
Location: India
GMAT Date: 10-25-2012
WE: Consulting (Computer Software)
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Oct 2012, 09:32
2
Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes of styles from former eras; instead, designers of everything from cars to computer monitors have adopted a cornerless style of smooth surfaces and curves that is more ergonomic, conforming to the shape of the body rather than flaunting shape for its own sake.

A. more ergonomic, conforming to the shape of the body rather than flaunting shape

B. more ergonomic, conformed to the body's shape and not to flaunting shape awkward + parallelism issue

C. ergonomic, more conformed to the shape of the body and not to shape flaunted
1. awkward 2. parallelism issue 3. incorrect usage of MORE...THAN idiom

D. ergonomic, conforming more to the body's shape rather than shape flaunted incorrect usage of MORE...THAN idiom

E. ergonomic, conforming more to the shape of the body than flaunting shape comparison issue
_________________

if my post helped you, let me know by pressing Kudos...

Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4542
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Oct 2012, 09:43
D would have been parallel if it were to be: ergonomic, conforming more to the body's shape rather than to the shape flaunted: Then the template would be more to x rather than to y.

Another tangle to this: We say it is ergonomic, and hence the shape is already conforming to the body’s shape. In that case, there cannot be another shape (that is) flaunted; Thus the meaning gets digressed, as if the thing has two shapes, one that is ergonomic and another that is flaunted. This is something that is untenable
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 11 Oct 2012
Posts: 43
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Oct 2012, 14:47
Can someone explain why E is wrong? I feel like A is wrong because the more isn't there.
_________________

Please give kudos if you found my post useful, I give kudos back :)

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 27 Jul 2012
Posts: 86
Location: India
GMAT Date: 10-25-2012
WE: Consulting (Computer Software)
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Oct 2012, 22:13
1
Quote:
Can someone explain why E is wrong? I feel like A is wrong because the more isn't there.


two reasons why E is wrong:
1. Unidiomatic: correct idiom is More to X than to Y or More X than Y

2. X and Y are comparable parts. option E says,

conforming more to the X (shape of the body) than Y(flaunting shape)

That's why E has a comparison issue as well.
_________________

if my post helped you, let me know by pressing Kudos...

Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 17 Aug 2015
Posts: 113
GMAT 1: 650 Q49 V29
Reviews Badge
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes of styles from  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 May 2017, 03:51
gone are the sharp edges-
needs to focus on the meaning - when we say x rather than y- it means we need to pick one. it is not a comparison of more or less kind of thing here because we are not comparing smooth vs sharp here.
choice A- CORRECT

Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes of styles from former eras; instead, designers of everything from cars to computer monitors have adopted a cornerless style of smooth surfaces and curves that is more ergonomic, conforming to the shape of the body rather than flaunting shape for its own sake.

Choice E has idiom error too- x more than y-
ergonomic, conforming more to the shape of the body than flaunting shape
Re: Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes of styles from &nbs [#permalink] 07 May 2017, 03:51
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Gone are the sharp edges and jutting planes of styles from

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.