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If, on a coordinate plane, point A has the coordinates

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If, on a coordinate plane, point A has the coordinates [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2010, 12:53
3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

38% (01:54) correct 62% (01:36) wrong based on 142 sessions

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If, on a coordinate plane, point A has the coordinates (-3,4), how far is point A from point E?

(1) Point E is on the Y-axis, four units from the origin
(2) If point A were twice as far from point E, it would be the same distance from point E as point C is at coordinates (0,-2)
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Re: I believe the official answer should be moddified... [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2010, 18:16
1) the point E could be on positive y axis at 4 units or negative y axis at 4 units. Insuff
2) clearly insuff because we dont know anything about E
combining - if point E is at positive y axis then A is at 3 units and doubling distance of A will make it 6 units - which is equal to distance of point E with respect to C which is at (0, -2).
So only when E is in positive Y axis can this be true. Hence combining 1 and 2 gives the answer. C
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Re: I believe the official answer should be moddified... [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2010, 23:16
I believe 1 is sufficient because it doesn't matter if it is negative nor possitive, in either way you can get the distance.

Please, somebody correct me...
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Re: I believe the official answer should be moddified... [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2010, 00:07
in either way you can find the distance, but you will get different answers with both the ways.

Since you cannot reach to a definite solution, the statement cannot be sufficient.
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Re: I believe the official answer should be moddified... [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2010, 04:32
gurpreetsingh wrote:
in either way you can find the distance, but you will get different answers with both the ways.

Since you cannot reach to a definite solution, the statement cannot be sufficient.

agree, it makes sense here.
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Re: I believe the official answer should be moddified... [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2010, 09:12
ulm wrote:
gurpreetsingh wrote:
in either way you can find the distance, but you will get different answers with both the ways.

Since you cannot reach to a definite solution, the statement cannot be sufficient.

agree, it makes sense here.


It makes sense, but the question asks how far are the two points from each other. With statement 1 is possible to calculate two distances. Maybe I am trapped in GMAT rethorics, and need to get used to it.

Manythanks
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Re: I believe the official answer should be moddified... [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2010, 09:26
Bull78 wrote:
ulm wrote:
gurpreetsingh wrote:
in either way you can find the distance, but you will get different answers with both the ways.

Since you cannot reach to a definite solution, the statement cannot be sufficient.

agree, it makes sense here.


It makes sense, but the question asks how far are the two points from each other. With statement 1 is possible to calculate two distances. Maybe I am trapped in GMAT rethorics, and need to get used to it.

Manythanks


Official Guide:

In data sufficiency problems that ask for the value of a quantity, the data given in the statements are sufficient only when it is possible to determine exactly one numerical value for the quantity.

Hope it helps.
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Re: If, on a coordinate plane, point A has the coordinates [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2013, 07:56
Bull78 wrote:
If, on a coordinate plane, point A has the coordinates (-3,4), how far is point A from point E?

1) Point E is on the Y-axis, four units from the origin

2) If point A were twice as far from point E, it would be the same distance from point E as point C is at coordinates (0,-2)

Lets see your wise oppinions colleagues!


Whats the OA please?
I thought the answer was B

You can take the distance from A to C and that would be twice the distance from A to E, so just divide by 2

Answer is B

Let us know please
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Re: If, on a coordinate plane, point A has the coordinates [#permalink]

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New post 30 Nov 2013, 23:42
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jlgdr wrote:
Bull78 wrote:
If, on a coordinate plane, point A has the coordinates (-3,4), how far is point A from point E?

1) Point E is on the Y-axis, four units from the origin

2) If point A were twice as far from point E, it would be the same distance from point E as point C is at coordinates (0,-2)

Lets see your wise oppinions colleagues!


Whats the OA please?
I thought the answer was B

You can take the distance from A to C and that would be twice the distance from A to E, so just divide by 2

Answer is B

Let us know please
Cheers
Happy thanksgiving!
J :)



B cannot be the answer since we do not know about point E

Suppose Point E has co ordinates (x,y)

Distance between Point E(x,y) and C(0, -2) = \sqrt{(y+2)^2 + x^2}
Distance between Point A(-3,4) and E(x,y) = \sqrt{(y-4)^2 + (x+3)^2} (By Distance formula)

Given 2(AE)=CE
so 2\sqrt{(y-4)^2 + (x+3)^2}= \sqrt{(y+2)^2 + x^2}
squaring both the sides
4((y-4)^2 + (x+3)^2) = ((y+2)^2 + x^2)
The above equation gives you an equation including x and y, that would be unsolvable further

Hope that helps..
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Re: If, on a coordinate plane, point A has the coordinates [#permalink]

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New post 01 Dec 2013, 01:11
jlgdr wrote:

You can take the distance from A to C and that would be twice the distance from A to E, so just divide by 2


The distance between E and C is twice the distance between A and E. What you have assumed above is inorrect.
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Re: If, on a coordinate plane, point A has the coordinates [#permalink]

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New post 28 Dec 2013, 06:06
mau5 wrote:
jlgdr wrote:

You can take the distance from A to C and that would be twice the distance from A to E, so just divide by 2


The distance between E and C is twice the distance between A and E. What you have assumed above is inorrect.


Yes, I understood what my error was. Tried it again and got it right this time

Thank you all

Cheers!
J :)
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Re: If, on a coordinate plane, point A has the coordinates [#permalink]

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Re: If, on a coordinate plane, point A has the coordinates   [#permalink] 13 Feb 2017, 19:24
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