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In a seminar paper delivered at the Annual Psychological

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In a seminar paper delivered at the Annual Psychological [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2005, 10:14
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In a seminar paper delivered at the Annual Psychological Association conference, Dr. Spagnoli distinguished pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without their constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders.
A)pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without their constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders
B)bipolar disorders and pronounced alterations in mood, occurring frequently and occasionally severely, without constituting a clinical illness
C) pronounced alterations in mood, perhaps frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders
D)between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders.
E)between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders
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 [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2005, 11:28
distinguish between x and y
distinguish x from y

are the two correct usages of idoms.

A)pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without their constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders
Wrong. It follows the x from y idomatic form but "their" spoils it.

B)bipolar disorders and pronounced alterations in mood, occurring frequently and occasionally severely, without constituting a clinical illness
Wrong

C) pronounced alterations in mood, perhaps frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders
wrong. wrong idiomatic usage.

D)between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders.
wrong. Wrong idiomatic usage.

E)between pronounced alterations in mood, which may be frequent and occasionally severe without constituting a clinical illness, and bipolar disorders.
Correct. distinguish between x and y
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 [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2005, 18:51
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E. distinguished between X and Y is idiomatic. 'which may be frequent...' modifies the alterations in mood
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 [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2005, 05:26
One more for 'E'

'A' is wrong because of the usage of their ".......,which may be frequent and occasionally severe without their constituting a clinical illness, from bipolar disorders"
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New post 22 Mar 2005, 06:09
E too :lol:
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 [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2005, 07:19
OA is 'E'.

Can someone please explain the following:
In a situation where the answer choices will have both options,
Between X and Y
Distinguish X from Y ,

which one will be a better option??? (I don't know if a situation like that will ever appear, but nevertheless always better to know!)
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 [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2005, 07:47
Prema wrote:
OA is 'E'.

Can someone please explain the following:
In a situation where the answer choices will have both options,
Between X and Y
Distinguish X from Y ,

which one will be a better option??? (I don't know if a situation like that will ever appear, but nevertheless always better to know!)


Normally, if the options contain both the idioms, you'll have to use POE in order to determine which one is relevant based on context. Most likely, the wrong option will have other mistakes than the usage of "between X and Y" and "Distinguish X from X".

However, usually "between X and Y" is used while making a choice between two entities and "distinguish X from Y" is used to highlight the differences between two entities. In the end, it is highly contextual.

Please feel free to add to this explaination.
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Re: In a seminar paper delivered at the Annual Psychological [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jan 2016, 21:28
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Explanation: Moods and disorders
Before moving to the expression, start with grammar. The answer choices provide you with some different idioms, so let's start there. The verb distinguished needs to be followed by from unless it's followed by between, so elminate (B) and (C). Between appears in (D) and (E) and, as idiomatically, between must always be followed by and. Eliminate (D) for pairing between and from. Finally,on the question of expression, (E) is superior to (A) because (A) contains an unnecessary their, (E) is the winner.
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Re: In a seminar paper delivered at the Annual Psychological [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2018, 19:36
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Re: In a seminar paper delivered at the Annual Psychological [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2018, 19:37
boiled down to A and E.
between...and... is correct here b/c "bipolar disorders" and "alterations" are 2 distinct types.
also, "their" in A is unnecessary and ambiguous.
Re: In a seminar paper delivered at the Annual Psychological   [#permalink] 05 Feb 2018, 19:37
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