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In the diagram, what is the value of x?

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In the diagram, what is the value of x? [#permalink]

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In the diagram, what is the value of x?

A. \(1+sqrt(2)\)
B. \(1+sqrt(3)\)
C. \(2sqrt(2)\)
D. \(sqrt(2)+sqrt(3)\)
E. \(2sqrt(3)\)


I know we aren't supposed to solve this through any use of trigonometry rules, but I'm not sure how to go about solving this within 2 minutes. I've tried dropping perpendicular from one of the vertices at the base to form a 30-60-90 triangle within the triangle, but I think I'm getting stuck with the algebra now?
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by Bunuel on 09 Jul 2013, 15:16, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: find side length of isosceles triangle [#permalink]

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essarr wrote:
In the diagram, what is the value of x?

A. \(1+sqrt(2)\)
B. \(1+sqrt(3)\)
C. \(2sqrt(2)\)
D. \(sqrt(2)+sqrt(3)\)
E. \(2sqrt(3)\)


I know we aren't supposed to solve this through any use of trigonometry rules, but I'm not sure how to go about solving this within 2 minutes. I've tried dropping perpendicular from one of the vertices at the base to form a 30-60-90 triangle within the triangle, but I think I'm getting stuck with the algebra now?


Rotate the diagram as shown below:
Attachment:
Ttriangle.png
Ttriangle.png [ 23.26 KiB | Viewed 13169 times ]
Triangle BDC is a 30°-60°-90° right triangle. Now, in a right triangle where the angles are 30°, 60°, and 90° the sides are always in the ratio \(1 : \sqrt{3}: 2\), the leg opposite 30° (BD) corresponds with \(1\), thethe leg opposite 60° (DC) corresponds with \(\sqrt{3}\), and the hypotenuse \(BC=x\) corresponds with 2. So, since \(BC=x\) then \(BD=\frac{x}{2}\) and \(DC=\frac{x\sqrt{3}}{2}\).

Also notice that \(AD=AC-DC=x-\frac{x\sqrt{3}}{2}\).

Next, from Pythagoras theorem \(AB^2=BD^2+AD^2\) --> \(2=(\frac{x}{2})^2+(x-\frac{x\sqrt{3}}{2})^2\) --> \(2=x^2(\frac{1}{4}+1-2*\frac{\sqrt{3}}{2}+\frac{3}{4})\) --> \(2=x^2(2-\sqrt{3})\) --> \(x^2=\frac{2}{2-\sqrt{3}}\) --> rationalize: \(x^2=\frac{2*(2+\sqrt{3})}{(2-\sqrt{3})(2+\sqrt{3})}=4+2\sqrt{3}\) --> \(x^2=4+2\sqrt{3}=(\sqrt{3})^2+2\sqrt{3}+1=(\sqrt{3}+1)^2\) --> \(x=\sqrt{3}+1\).

Answer: B.

Hope it's clear.
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Re: find side length of isosceles triangle [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2012, 15:36
Bunuel wrote:
In the diagram, what is the value of x?

...
--> \(x^2=4+2\sqrt{3}=(\sqrt{3})^2+2\sqrt{3}+1=(\sqrt{3}+1)^2\) --> \(x=\sqrt{3}+1\).




I got up to the \(x^2 = 4 + 2sqrt(3)\)... lol, i don't think i'd ever be able to recognize the way you rationalized it after that in a test situation, although it does make perfect sense.. bringing back memories of first-year calculus when we had to rationalize like this..

thanks so much!

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Find length x of triangle [#permalink]

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I was looking at the advanced quant book for mgmat and I came across this problem. In my head I figured that it is an isosceles triangle, with the remaining angles as 75 degrees. Since the 30 degree angle matches up with a √2 (~1.4), and 75 degrees is 2.5x bigger than the 30 degrees, then the triangle side X must be 2.5 (~1.4). That is around 3.5, which is answer E. The thing is, that isn't the answer and I am confused why that wouldn't work.

I appreciate the assistance!
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Re: In the diagram, what is the value of x? [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2015, 17:03
TheLostOne wrote:
I was looking at the advanced quant book for mgmat and I came across this problem. In my head I figured that it is an isosceles triangle, with the remaining angles as 75 degrees. Since the 30 degree angle matches up with a √2 (~1.4), and 75 degrees is 2.5x bigger than the 30 degrees, then the triangle side X must be 2.5 (~1.4). That is around 3.5, which is answer E. The thing is, that isn't the answer and I am confused why that wouldn't work.

I appreciate the assistance!


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Re: In the diagram, what is the value of x? [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jan 2015, 02:28
TheLostOne wrote:
I was looking at the advanced quant book for mgmat and I came across this problem. In my head I figured that it is an isosceles triangle, with the remaining angles as 75 degrees. Since the 30 degree angle matches up with a √2 (~1.4), and 75 degrees is 2.5x bigger than the 30 degrees, then the triangle side X must be 2.5 (~1.4). That is around 3.5, which is answer E. The thing is, that isn't the answer and I am confused why that wouldn't work.

I appreciate the assistance!



I tackled this problem in the same way...

this was my approach....

as it's an isosceles triangle =

30 + a + a = 180 ---------> a = 75

Now area of triangle is given by

1/2(x*x) sin30 and 1/2(x* sqrt2) sin75

as area will be same

(x*x) sin30 = (x*sqrt2) sin75

sin 30 = 0.5
sin 75 < 1 (close to 0.9)

on solving

x < 2 * sqrt2

option A and Option B left

Safe pick is Option B (as 2*sqrt2 = 2.8 and 1 + sqrt3 = 2.73)

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In the diagram, what is the value of x? [#permalink]

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New post 04 Feb 2016, 18:14
Bunuel wrote:
essarr wrote:
In the diagram, what is the value of x?

A. \(1+sqrt(2)\)
B. \(1+sqrt(3)\)
C. \(2sqrt(2)\)
D. \(sqrt(2)+sqrt(3)\)
E. \(2sqrt(3)\)


I know we aren't supposed to solve this through any use of trigonometry rules, but I'm not sure how to go about solving this within 2 minutes. I've tried dropping perpendicular from one of the vertices at the base to form a 30-60-90 triangle within the triangle, but I think I'm getting stuck with the algebra now?


Rotate the diagram as shown below:
Attachment:
Ttriangle.png
Triangle BDC is a 30°-60°-90° right triangle. Now, in a right triangle where the angles are 30°, 60°, and 90° the sides are always in the ratio \(1 : \sqrt{3}: 2\), the leg opposite 30° (BD) corresponds with \(1\), thethe leg opposite 60° (DC) corresponds with \(\sqrt{3}\), and the hypotenuse \(BC=x\) corresponds with 2. So, since \(BC=x\) then \(BD=\frac{x}{2}\) and \(DC=\frac{x\sqrt{3}}{2}\).

Also notice that \(AD=AC-DC=x-\frac{x\sqrt{3}}{2}\).

Next, from Pythagoras theorem \(AB^2=BD^2+AD^2\) --> \(2=(\frac{x}{2})^2+(x-\frac{x\sqrt{3}}{2})^2\) --> \(2=x^2(\frac{1}{4}+1-2*\frac{\sqrt{3}}{2}+\frac{3}{4})\) --> \(2=x^2(2-\sqrt{3})\) --> \(x^2=\frac{2}{2-\sqrt{3}}\) --> rationalize: \(x^2=\frac{2*(2+\sqrt{3})}{(2-\sqrt{3})(2+\sqrt{3})}=4+2\sqrt{3}\) --> \(x^2=4+2\sqrt{3}=(\sqrt{3})^2+2\sqrt{3}+1=(\sqrt{3}+1)^2\) --> \(x=\sqrt{3}+1\).

Answer: B.

Hope it's clear.
Being naive here... How do you define Triangle BDC as 30 60 90 ? isn't the entire angle B 60?

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Re: In the diagram, what is the value of x? [#permalink]

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essarr wrote:
Attachment:
isofindx.jpg
In the diagram, what is the value of x?

A. \(1+sqrt(2)\)
B. \(1+sqrt(3)\)
C. \(2sqrt(2)\)
D. \(sqrt(2)+sqrt(3)\)
E. \(2sqrt(3)\)


I know we aren't supposed to solve this through any use of trigonometry rules, but I'm not sure how to go about solving this within 2 minutes. I've tried dropping perpendicular from one of the vertices at the base to form a 30-60-90 triangle within the triangle, but I think I'm getting stuck with the algebra now?



Here is how I approached this question:
Create a 30-60-90 triangle by dropping an altitude from one of the base angles. The sides are in the ratio \(1:\sqrt{3}:2\). Since side x corresponds to 2 in the ratio, the length of the altitude will be x/2.
Say the altitude from 30 degree angle to side \(\sqrt{2}\) is of length y.

Area of triangle = \((\frac{1}{2})*y*\sqrt{2} = (\frac{1}{2})*(\frac{x}{2})*x\)
\(y = \frac{x^2}{2\sqrt{2}}\)

Now use the pythagorean theorem:

\(y^2 + (\frac{\sqrt{2}}{2})^2 = x^2\)

\(\frac{x^4}{8} + \frac{1}{2} = x^2\)

\(x^4 - 8x^2 + 4 = 0\)

Put \(x^2 = a\)

\(a^2 - 8a + 4 = 0\)

\(a = 4 + 2\sqrt{3}\)

\(x^2 = 3 + 1 + 2\sqrt{3} = \sqrt{3}^2 + 1 + 2\sqrt{3}\)

\(x = \sqrt{3} + 1\)
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Re: In the diagram, what is the value of x? [#permalink]

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New post 05 Feb 2016, 08:58
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
essarr wrote:
Attachment:
isofindx.jpg
In the diagram, what is the value of x?

A. \(1+sqrt(2)\)
B. \(1+sqrt(3)\)
C. \(2sqrt(2)\)
D. \(sqrt(2)+sqrt(3)\)
E. \(2sqrt(3)\)


I know we aren't supposed to solve this through any use of trigonometry rules, but I'm not sure how to go about solving this within 2 minutes. I've tried dropping perpendicular from one of the vertices at the base to form a 30-60-90 triangle within the triangle, but I think I'm getting stuck with the algebra now?



Here is how I approached this question:
Create a 30-60-90 triangle by dropping an altitude from one of the base angles. The sides are in the ratio \(1:\sqrt{3}:2\). Since side x corresponds to 2 in the ratio, the length of the altitude will be x/2.
Say the altitude from 30 degree angle to side \(\sqrt{2}\) is of length y.

Area of triangle = \((\frac{1}{2})*y*\sqrt{2} = (\frac{1}{2})*(\frac{x}{2})*x\)
\(y = \frac{x^2}{2\sqrt{2}}\)

Now use the pythagorean theorem:

\(y^2 + (\frac{\sqrt{2}}{2})^2 = x^2\)

\(\frac{x^4}{8} + \frac{1}{2} = x^2\)

\(x^4 - 8x^2 + 4 = 0\)

Put \(x^2 = a\)

\(a^2 - 8a + 4 = 0\)

\(a = 4 + 2\sqrt{3}\)

\(x^2 = 3 + 1 + 2\sqrt{3} = \sqrt{3}^2 + 1 + 2\sqrt{3}\)

\(x = \sqrt{3} + 1\)
Again sorry how do you substitute x= sq rt 2 when you initially define x corresponds to 2...coming back after a break..sorry I'm being rusty here!

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Re: In the diagram, what is the value of x? [#permalink]

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vinny87 wrote:
VeritasPrepKarishma wrote:
essarr wrote:
Attachment:
isofindx.jpg
In the diagram, what is the value of x?

A. \(1+sqrt(2)\)
B. \(1+sqrt(3)\)
C. \(2sqrt(2)\)
D. \(sqrt(2)+sqrt(3)\)
E. \(2sqrt(3)\)


I know we aren't supposed to solve this through any use of trigonometry rules, but I'm not sure how to go about solving this within 2 minutes. I've tried dropping perpendicular from one of the vertices at the base to form a 30-60-90 triangle within the triangle, but I think I'm getting stuck with the algebra now?



Here is how I approached this question:
Create a 30-60-90 triangle by dropping an altitude from one of the base angles. The sides are in the ratio \(1:\sqrt{3}:2\). Since side x corresponds to 2 in the ratio, the length of the altitude will be x/2.
Say the altitude from 30 degree angle to side \(\sqrt{2}\) is of length y.

Area of triangle = \((\frac{1}{2})*y*\sqrt{2} = (\frac{1}{2})*(\frac{x}{2})*x\)
\(y = \frac{x^2}{2\sqrt{2}}\)

Now use the pythagorean theorem:

\(y^2 + (\frac{\sqrt{2}}{2})^2 = x^2\)

\(\frac{x^4}{8} + \frac{1}{2} = x^2\)

\(x^4 - 8x^2 + 4 = 0\)

Put \(x^2 = a\)

\(a^2 - 8a + 4 = 0\)

\(a = 4 + 2\sqrt{3}\)

\(x^2 = 3 + 1 + 2\sqrt{3} = \sqrt{3}^2 + 1 + 2\sqrt{3}\)

\(x = \sqrt{3} + 1\)
Again sorry how do you substitute x= sq rt 2 when you initially define x corresponds to 2...coming back after a break..sorry I'm being rusty here!

Never mind...got it :-D

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Re: In the diagram, what is the value of x? [#permalink]

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New post 19 Feb 2017, 03:33
Hello from the GMAT Club BumpBot!

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Re: In the diagram, what is the value of x? [#permalink]

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New post 20 Feb 2017, 06:51
The hardest thing here is to rationalize like did Bunuel :)
I picked B just doing approx calculation...after I got 4+2(3)^1/2...

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Re: In the diagram, what is the value of x?   [#permalink] 20 Feb 2017, 06:51
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