GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 20 Oct 2019, 04:42

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Retired Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: enjoying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 5102
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 04 Jul 2017, 12:53
1
13
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

48% (01:59) correct 52% (02:03) wrong based on 471 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Ironical as it may seem, women’s emancipation from the clutches of social drudgery through their employment in high paying jobs alongside men, has led neither to elevated social status within their married families, or to increased say in the family decision making or to secure independence from their spouse.


(A) has led neither to elevated social status within their married families, or to increased say in the family decision making or

(B) has led neither to elevated social status within their married families, nor to increased say in the family decision making nor

(C) has not led either to elevated social status within their married families, neither to increased say in the family decision making and nor

(D) has not led to elevation of their social status within their married families, or to increased say in the family decision making or

(E) has not led to either elevation of their social status within their married families, or to increased say in the family decision making or

_________________
Are you stuck around 630? If you can't make out how to pole-vault over the 630-barrier, you can do so with my one-to-one lessons. (+919884544509)

Originally posted by daagh on 10 Oct 2010, 11:49.
Last edited by daagh on 04 Jul 2017, 12:53, edited 1 time in total.
Most Helpful Expert Reply
Retired Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: enjoying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 5102
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jul 2017, 12:52
5
1
Top Contributor
1
Yes, Mrinal is correct. Even 'Grammar Girl' says that neither … nor can be used for more than two items as long as we repeat nor for each of the later items.
Therefore, I feel B is the best answer
I am changing the OA to B.
Thanks Madhavi for your correct judgment.
_________________
Are you stuck around 630? If you can't make out how to pole-vault over the 630-barrier, you can do so with my one-to-one lessons. (+919884544509)
Most Helpful Community Reply
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 15 Jan 2017
Posts: 341
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jul 2017, 11:35
5
Hello, any update on the OA? I picked B too for neither X, nor Y, nor Z
The rest seem awkward in idiom placement. Any inputs would be welcome!
General Discussion
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 04 Apr 2009
Posts: 46
Location: United Kingdom
Schools: Cornell
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Oct 2010, 15:57
Went for D without any confidence.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: enjoying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 5102
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Oct 2010, 12:08
3
1
The thumb rule to remember here is that in formal writing, we use neither-nor/either – or constructions only when two issues are involved. For more than two issues, as in the given case, neither-nor/either–or constructions are considered unidiomatic. Since three phenomena are involved, we can safely eliminate choices A, B, C and E that use neither or either, leaving only D as the right answer
_________________
Are you stuck around 630? If you can't make out how to pole-vault over the 630-barrier, you can do so with my one-to-one lessons. (+919884544509)
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 29 Sep 2008
Posts: 85
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Oct 2010, 10:49
2
i think we can use neither..nor...nor .go through the link

http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/gener ... r-nor.html
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 22 Jun 2010
Posts: 84
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 12 Oct 2010, 13:15
sticking to rules we are just down to D, but I had gut feeling B is Ok, I'm not quite sure.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 27 Sep 2010
Posts: 14
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Oct 2010, 04:46
What is OA? i also piched up D for the same reason.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
Status: Can't give up
Joined: 20 Dec 2009
Posts: 194
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Nov 2010, 15:16
1
B+ for the correct idiom.. neither....nor....
Intern
Intern
User avatar
B
Joined: 18 Nov 2016
Posts: 41
Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2017, 03:42
2
I think B is missing a comma...?

Quote:
(B) has led neither to elevated social status within their married families, nor to increased say in the family decision making, nor
Manager
Manager
avatar
P
Joined: 14 Oct 2015
Posts: 243
GPA: 3.57
Reviews Badge
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2017, 08:06
daagh wrote:
Yes, Mrinal is correct. Even 'Grammar Girl' says that neither … nor can be used for more than two items as long as we repeat nor for each of the later items.
Therefore, I feel B is the best answer
I am changing the OA to B.
Thanks Madhavi for your correct judgment.


A side question, is "Ironical as it may seem" better usage compared to "Ironic as it may seem" and if so could you elaborate on the rules of usage.
_________________
Please hit Kudos if this post helped you inch closer to your GMAT goal.
Procrastination is the termite constantly trying to eat your GMAT tree from the inside.
There is one fix to every problem, working harder!
Retired Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: enjoying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 5102
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2017, 08:20
Top Contributor
jedit
Quote:
Ironical is a standard word—it is an alternative adjective form of irony—but it means the same thing as ironic.
Ironical is the more old-fashioned form of the word, and ironic is the more common form today. You can choose to use either one ironical is more common in Britain than in America, so that may be why it shows up in the work of English writer Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond.


-- Sourced from

http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/educat ... s-ironical
_________________
Are you stuck around 630? If you can't make out how to pole-vault over the 630-barrier, you can do so with my one-to-one lessons. (+919884544509)
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Oct 2017
Posts: 19
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Feb 2019, 09:16
daagh wrote:
Ironical as it may seem, women’s emancipation from the clutches of social drudgery through their employment in high paying jobs alongside men, has led neither to elevated social status within their married families, or to increased say in the family decision making or to secure independence from their spouse.


What about the parallelism to elevated social status -- to increased say -- to secure independence??

No answer seems to address that, am I mistaken in some way? Please let me gently know.
Retired Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: enjoying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 5102
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Feb 2019, 10:00
Top Contributor
paolo

All the three are parallel.

1. to elevated social status --- This is a prepositional phrase. Elevated and Social are two adjectives modifying the noun 'status'

2. to increased say -- increased is the adjective modifying 'say', a noun -- This is also a prepositional phrase.


3. to secure independence -- 'secure' is an adjective meaning 'safe' and not a verb meaning 'fetch' and it modifies the noun independence.

I don't think they are any wrong. Any problem?
_________________
Are you stuck around 630? If you can't make out how to pole-vault over the 630-barrier, you can do so with my one-to-one lessons. (+919884544509)
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Oct 2017
Posts: 19
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Feb 2019, 10:10
daagh wrote:
paolo

All the three are parallel.

1. to elevated social status --- This is a prepositional phrase. Elevated and Social are two adjectives modifying the noun 'status'

2. to increased say -- increased is the adjective modifying 'say', a noun -- This is also a prepositional phrase.


3. to secure independence -- 'secure' is an adjective meaning 'safe' and not a verb meaning 'fetch' and it modifies the noun independence.

I don't think they are any wrong. Any problem?


Oh sorry daagh, my bad. I was mistakinf "to secure independence" for a verb *palmface
Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 19 Oct 2018
Posts: 63
GMAT 1: 730 Q49 V41
Reviews Badge
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Mar 2019, 23:18
A is out, “neither” has to be followed by “nor”.
C is out too, “either…neither” is not an accepted form.
D breaks parallelism. “led to elevation” doesn’t parallel “increased say”. So D is out.
B and E are correct but as B is slightly less wordy that E, I think B will be the right answer.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the   [#permalink] 03 Mar 2019, 23:18
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Ironical as it may seem, womens emancipation from the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne