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Is 4 + n/6 an integer?

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Is 4 + n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 27 Jul 2015, 14:53
1
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A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

87% (00:39) correct 13% (00:50) wrong based on 147 sessions

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Is 4 + n/6 an integer?

(1) n is a multiple of 3.
(2) n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0.

OA is B.

I thought it was E.

My reasoning: when n = 6, the answer is yes, but when n = -24, the answer would be no as 0 is not an integer.

Please advise.

Originally posted by calvinhobbes on 26 Jan 2010, 05:54.
Last edited by Bunuel on 27 Jul 2015, 14:53, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic, edited the question and added the OA.
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Re: Is 4 + n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2010, 06:03
1
calvinhobbes wrote:
Is 4 + (n/6) an integer?

(1) n is a multiple of 3.
(2) n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0.

OA is
B.


I thought it was .

My reasoning:
when n = 6, the answer is yes, but when n = -24, the answer would be no as 0 is not an integer.


Please advise.


(1) - if n is 3, n/6 is not an integer, but if n is 6, n/6 is an integer, so insufficient.
(2) - n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0,meaning n has to be a multiple of 6 (0, 6, 12, etc).

I would think the answer is B - (2) alone is sufficient.

It seems that there is confusion on the internet concerning 0 as an integer - my opinion for the GMAT is that 0 should be treated as an integer... does GMAC state otherwise?
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Re: Is 4 + n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2010, 06:09
1
calvinhobbes wrote:
Is 4 + (n/6) an integer?

(1) n is a multiple of 3.
(2) n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0.

OA is
B.


I thought it was .

My reasoning:
when n = 6, the answer is yes, but when n = -24, the answer would be no as 0 is not an integer.


Please advise.


0 is an integer, moreover 0 is an even integer. Maybe you have mistaken this property for another: zero is neither positive nor negative?
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Re: Is 4 + n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jan 2010, 06:20
Thank you both of you.

Yes I've mistaken it is neither +ve nor -ve.
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Is 4+n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2014, 01:42
1
Good Day,

The question is as follows:

Is 4+n/6 an integer?

1. n is a multiple of 3
2. n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0

Though the problem looks pretty straight forward, it underlines a very imp fact regarding Data Sufficiency YES/NO questions and this fact I want to be cleared!

Now, if we look at the individual statements, obviously we choose values and evaluate the Question Stem.

1. n is a multiple of 3

we can select n to be 3, in which the answer is NO and we can select n as 6 in which the answer is YES.

Since data sufficiency basically tests how the sufficiency of data is interpreted, my question is this...

Statement clearly gives us the answer as either YES or NO..and therefore we can answer the question stem as:

4+n/6 is an integer if n=6,12..and it is not an integer if n=3,5 etc

Moving on statement 2, which is sufficient to answer the question stem.

But, the answer is B and I feel it should be D since we can answer the question stem using each statement- either statement is sufficient by itself to determine YES/NO for an "IS" question.

Can someone please clarify my reasoning and advise where I am wrong?

Thanks
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Re: Is 4+n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2014, 02:18
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raj44 wrote:
Good Day,

The question is as follows:

Is 4+n/6 an integer?

1. n is a multiple of 3
2. n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0

Though the problem looks pretty straight forward, it underlines a very imp fact regarding Data Sufficiency YES/NO questions and this fact I want to be cleared!

Now, if we look at the individual statements, obviously we choose values and evaluate the Question Stem.

1. n is a multiple of 3

we can select n to be 3, in which the answer is NO and we can select n as 6 in which the answer is YES.

Since data sufficiency basically tests how the sufficiency of data is interpreted, my question is this...

Statement clearly gives us the answer as either YES or NO..and therefore we can answer the question stem as:

4+n/6 is an integer if n=6,12..and it is not an integer if n=3,5 etc

Moving on statement 2, which is sufficient to answer the question stem.

But, the answer is B and I feel it should be D since we can answer the question stem using each statement- either statement is sufficient by itself to determine YES/NO for an "IS" question.

Can someone please clarify my reasoning and advise where I am wrong?

Thanks
Rajeev


The point is that in a Yes/No Data Sufficiency questions, statement(s) is sufficient if the answer is “always yes” or “always no” while a statement(s) is insufficient if the answer is "sometimes yes" and "sometimes no".

When a DS question asks about the value of some variable, then the statement(s) is sufficient ONLY if you can get the single numerical value of this variable.

Hope it's clear.
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Re: Is 4+n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Aug 2014, 05:45
Thanks Bunuel ! It is clear now.
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Re: Is 4 + n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2015, 05:37
St1: n = 3k --> Not sufficient
St2: n = 6k --> Sufficient

Answer: B
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Re: Is 4 + n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Dec 2015, 06:06
Bunuel wrote:
Is 4 + n/6 an integer?

(1) n is a multiple of 3.
(2) n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0.


Solution:

Is 4 + n/6 an integer?--> is n/6 is an integer?---> is n multiple of 6?

Statement 1) n is a multiple of 3.

n = 3 , 6 or 9--> 3 is not a multiple of 6 , but 6 is.

Hence Insufficient.

Statement 2) n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0.

Clearly n is a multiple of 6.

Hence Sufficient.

Ans B.
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Re: Is 4 + n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2017, 20:45
andrewcs wrote:
calvinhobbes wrote:
Is 4 + (n/6) an integer?

(1) n is a multiple of 3.
(2) n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0.

OA is
B.


I thought it was .

My reasoning:
when n = 6, the answer is yes, but when n = -24, the answer would be no as 0 is not an integer.


Please advise.


(1) - if n is 3, n/6 is not an integer, but if n is 6, n/6 is an integer, so insufficient.
(2) - n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0,meaning n has to be a multiple of 6 (0, 6, 12, etc).

I would think the answer is B - (2) alone is sufficient.

It seems that there is confusion on the internet concerning 0 as an integer - my opinion for the GMAT is that 0 should be treated as an integer... does GMAC state otherwise?



Can someone clarify whether this question is asking 4 + n/ 6 as a whole or 4 + (n/6)?
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Re: Is 4 + n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2017, 21:20
Nunuboy1994 wrote:
andrewcs wrote:
calvinhobbes wrote:
Is 4 + (n/6) an integer?

(1) n is a multiple of 3.
(2) n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0.

OA is
B.


I thought it was .

My reasoning:
when n = 6, the answer is yes, but when n = -24, the answer would be no as 0 is not an integer.


Please advise.


(1) - if n is 3, n/6 is not an integer, but if n is 6, n/6 is an integer, so insufficient.
(2) - n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0,meaning n has to be a multiple of 6 (0, 6, 12, etc).

I would think the answer is B - (2) alone is sufficient.

It seems that there is confusion on the internet concerning 0 as an integer - my opinion for the GMAT is that 0 should be treated as an integer... does GMAC state otherwise?



Can someone clarify whether this question is asking 4 + n/ 6 as a whole or 4 + (n/6)?


4 + n/6 can only mean 4 + (n/6), nothing else. If it were (4 + n)/6 it would have been written this way.
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Re: Is 4 + n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2017, 17:33
calvinhobbes wrote:
Is 4 + n/6 an integer?

(1) n is a multiple of 3.
(2) n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0.


Since 4 is already an integer, we really need to determine whether n/6 is an integer.

Statement One Alone:

n is a multiple of 3.

Statement one is not sufficient to answer the question. If n = 3, then n/6 is not an integer; however, if n = 6, then n/6 is an integer.

Statement Two Alone:

n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0.

Using the information in statement two, we see that n is a multiple of 6, and thus n/6 is an integer.

Answer: B
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Re: Is 4 + n/6 an integer?  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2018, 07:33
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Bunuel wrote:
Is 4 + n/6 an integer?

(1) n is a multiple of 3.
(2) n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0.


Target question: Is 4 + n/6 an integer?

This is a good candidate for rephrasing the target question (see video below).

If 4 is an integer, then 4 + n/6 will be an integer if and only if n/6 is an integer. Moreover, n/6 will be an integer if and only if n is divisible by 6. So, we can REPHRASE the target question as....

REPHRASED target question: Is n divisible by 6?

Statement 1: n is a multiple of 3
There are several values of n that satisfy this condition. Here are two values that yield conflicting answers to the REPHRASED target question :
Case a: n = 3, in which case n is NOT divisible by 6
Case b: n = 6, in which case n IS divisible by 6
Since we cannot answer the REPHRASED target question with certainty, statement 1 is NOT SUFFICIENT

Statement 2: n divided by 6 has a remainder of 0
If n is divided 6 leaves remainder 0, then n is definitely divisible by 6.
Since we can answer the REPHRASED target question with certainty, statement 2 is SUFFICIENT

Answer = B

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Re: Is 4 + n/6 an integer?   [#permalink] 20 Apr 2018, 07:33
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