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Lawyer: Juries are traditionally given their instructions

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Lawyer: Juries are traditionally given their instructions [#permalink]

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Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

81% (01:18) correct 19% (01:24) wrong based on 78 sessions

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Lawyer: Juries are traditionally given their instructions in convoluted, legalistic language. The verbiage is intended to make the instructions more precise, but greater precision is of little use if most jurors have difficulty understanding the instructions. Since it is more important for jurors to have a basic but adequate understanding of their role than it is for the details of that role to be precisely specified, jury instructions should be formulated in simple, easily comprehensible language.

Each of the following, if true, strengthens the lawyer's argument EXCEPT:

(A) Most jurors are less likely to understand instructions given in convoluted, legalistic language than instructions given in simple, easily comprehensible language.
(B) Most jurors do not have an adequate understanding of their role after being given jury instructions in convoluted, legalistic language.
(C) Jury instructions formulated in simple, easily comprehensible language can adequately describe the role of the jurors.
(D) The details of the role of the jurors cannot be specified with complete precision in simple, easily comprehensible language.
(E) Jurors do not need to know the precise details of their role in order to have an adequate understanding of that role.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: Lawyer: Juries are traditionally given their instructions [#permalink]

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New post 25 Nov 2017, 15:52
it seems this question is not one of official gmat-like questions; test takers can choose to ignore this question to save time.

Kudos [?]: 55 [0], given: 1506

Re: Lawyer: Juries are traditionally given their instructions   [#permalink] 25 Nov 2017, 15:52
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Lawyer: Juries are traditionally given their instructions

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