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LOST in prep

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Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 30 Jan 2017
Posts: 86
Location: India
Schools: ISB '19
GMAT 1: 630 Q47 V29
GMAT 2: 660 Q47 V34
GMAT 3: 730 Q49 V40
GPA: 3.9
LOST in prep [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2017, 08:11
Hello People,
I have been preparing for GMAT since January 2017. I gave my actual exam on 4th of April and scored a 630 (Q47, V29) IR 6 and AWA 5. I was really nervous on the test day and overshot the break before my verbal section. This probably screwed up my verbal score because I used to score a 35ish during my mocks.
I used the following resources for my first attempt:
1. Magoosh Online full course
2. Manhattan Review CR Guide
3. Manhattan Review Math Study companion
4. Powerscore CR Bible
5. Kaplan Online question bank
The issue with Magoosh mocks was that they included only the Math and Verbal section. Hence, I never accounted the fatigue of AWA and IR on my test scores. However, with the new GMAT rules, I should be able to do better. I gave 6 Kaplan mocks as well (all under test conditions). My scores ranged from 610 to 710. Hence, I was really unsure of my test performance on the D-day.
I understand that I committed 2 major mistakes during my first attempt:
1. Never touched the OG
2. Did not use this forum
3. No proper grasp on verbal
I was completely lost after the 630. Even though I absolutely detest coaching institutes, I joined a local branch of Princeton Review in India for a 3 month course. I did the following during my 3 months:
1. OG 2017
2. Official Quantitative Review 2017
3. Official Verbal Review 2017
4. Princeton Materials
5. MGMAT SC guide
6. MGMAT RC guide
Here are my recent test scores (all given under test conditions):
1. Manhattan Prep (V34, Q28) : 520
2. Princeton (V34, Q41) : 620
3. Princeton (V38, Q39) : 630
4. GMAT Prep1 (V35, Q45) : 650
5. Princeton (V33, Q48) : 650
Hence, here I am. Stuck at 650 even after 7 months. I feel really low reading stories of people who cracked this exam within 3 months. I try hard every day to study as much as I can because of my working hours. I have even solved SC questions in my sleep. I have booked a date again on 26th October 2017. I am running out of time and financial resources to continue my GMAT prep. I really need a 700+.
A humble request from a hardworking student: Please help me plan my 3 months in a way so that I achieve my desired score. Thank you all.
Magoosh Discount CodesMath Revolution Discount CodesOptimus Prep Discount Codes
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Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 05 Mar 2017
Posts: 25
GMAT 1: 730 Q48 V41
Re: LOST in prep [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2017, 15:07
1
Please do not dismay; the GMAT is a truly daunting experience especially for non-native English speakers. It is great that you are practicing using the OG Guide since the problems contained in it are very representative of the real GMAT. I love Manhattan Prep guides, and I truly found the Kaplan Gmat Premiere 2017 really helpful (especially to give you a really broad overview of the GMAT and because of its practice tests). However, you do seem to already have enough study materials so I would not recommend you to buy any more books; instead focus on studying/practicing, with great detail, using what you already have. A really helpful yet tedious way of getting better is by redoing all the problems that you get wrong until you get them right within 2 minutes or less; this might seem as unproductive but you'll see that this will help you to get better at answering new and harder questions correctly (this will also improve your stamina and desperation skills). Also, keep a log of your errors and study it to see what you're weaknesses are. Remember that the level of difficulty of the questions you get right is more important in determining your score than the number of questions that you get right. A very important aspect of the GMAT is that it forces you to identify those questions that you know deep inside that you won't be able to answer correctly in order to pass them (make an educated guess) to concentrate on those questions that you know you can answer correctly. If you think about it, those questions that the GMAT forces you to skip are probably of a higher difficulty level so they will hurt your score less. Practice makes perfect! You have enough time to improve your score.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 30 Jan 2017
Posts: 86
Location: India
Schools: ISB '19
GMAT 1: 630 Q47 V29
GMAT 2: 660 Q47 V34
GMAT 3: 730 Q49 V40
GPA: 3.9
Re: LOST in prep [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2017, 15:48
Hey Rhymenocerous, thank you so much for helping me out. I know that OG is the closest one can get to real GMAT questions. Hence, during solving my OG, I marked all the questions that I got incorrect. Now that I am solving them again, I sort of get almost all of them correct. Maybe its because I have recently completed them so they are stuck in my memory.
Another thing is that I take >2 min to solve the 700+ questions (both in quant and verbal). Will it be a wise thing only to practice 700+ questions from Gmatclub tests and hard verbal resources ?
Thanks again !!
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Current Student
avatar
S
Joined: 31 Dec 2015
Posts: 59
Location: India
GMAT 1: 670 Q44 V38
GMAT 2: 680 Q44 V39
Re: LOST in prep [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2017, 18:28
2
Hi,

Since you have mentioned that verbal is your weak-spot, have you tried E-gmat? If not, I strongly suggest you to go ahead and give it a shot. E-Gmat is amazing for Sentence correction- I personally went from a 27 to 42 on the actual test in SC.
Start with mastering your weakest section in Verbal- If SC is your weakest, it will take 20-30 days in learning all the rules from start with E-gmat. Once you have learnt all the rules, try to apply the same in OG questions and see your accuracy shoot up.

If RC and CR are your weak sections- Practise, practise and practise more till you can comfortably get a 35+ in your mocks.
As there are no "rules" to be memorised for these sections, practise is the only way out here. But yes, give importance to Official questions this time around. Nothing comes close to those.

If your Quants are decent and scores looming around 47-48 then you MUST get a 38+ in Verbal to hit that 700. Getting a 38-40 is pretty do-able if you are absolutely good with one section and Okay-ish in the other two. As SC is the easiest to improve, I suggest you master SC with 90% accuracy. Instead of solving questions blindly- try to apply the rules in the 600-700 level questions and try to get to the answer- Rather understand WHY each answer choice is incorrect. For 700+ level questions though- it is the meaning clarity that is going to help you ace them.

Also please remember not to practise from a variety of sources. This is not going to help you. Stick to just ONE or two good materials along with Gmat Prep exam pack(1,2 and the 2 free tests) and question pack 1 questions and of course the official guide. OG is a must.

Good Luck to you . Stay motivated and you will hit that 700+.

Cheers. :)
1 KUDOS received
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 05 Mar 2017
Posts: 25
GMAT 1: 730 Q48 V41
Re: LOST in prep [#permalink]

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New post 05 Aug 2017, 13:22
1
The way I practiced Gmat problems consisted of (approximately) 75% doing random problems (all difficulties) and 25% doing "hard" problems. Why did I dedicate 75% of my time to solve "random difficulty" problems? Well, when you take the GMAT exam you'll see that it will be very hard to gauge the difficulty level of the questions (and you should not even try to gauge the difficulty because it will mess up your concentration). This happens because some 700 level problems will seem very easy to you and some 500 level problems will seem very hard to you. For example, I found almost all Geometry problems easy or at least doable within 2 minutes, but I found some 600 level "number properties" questions very hard; the level of difficulty depends, in part, on who you are. That's why I decided to practice problems of random difficulties; in order to mimic the real GMAT. If you focus solely or mostly on hard questions, you may become very good at solving them but you will be neglecting on working on improving your chances of getting easy and medium difficulty level questions correctly. Of course, as you progress and you see that you do not miss easy questions, then start focusing more on medium difficulty level questions and so on. Remember that missing an easy question will hurt your score the most and missing a 700 level question will hurt your score the least. I focused 25%of my time on solving hard level questions because it is also very important to be able to answer correctly a few hard or 700 level questions during the GMAT.
I never took the Gmatclub tests so I do not know anything about them but I imagine that they're really good.
Re: LOST in prep   [#permalink] 05 Aug 2017, 13:22
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