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Museum curator: Our ancient Egyptian collection includes an earthenwar

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Museum curator: Our ancient Egyptian collection includes an earthenwar  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 18 Feb 2019, 21:29
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A
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C
D
E

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Museum curator: Our ancient Egyptian collection includes an earthenware hippopotamus that resembles a child's toy. It was discovered in a tomb, upside down, with its legs broken off. We know that the ancient Egyptians believed the dead had to wage eternal war with beasts. Breaking the legs off a representation of an animal was thought to help a deceased person in this war. We conclude that, far from being a toy, this hippopotamus was a religious object.

Which one of the following is an assumption required by the curator's argument?


(A) The tomb in which the hippopotamus was found was not the tomb of a child.

(B) Earthenware figures were never used as children's toys in ancient Egypt.

(C) The tomb in which the hippopotamus was found was not reentered from the time of burial until archaeologists opened it.

(D) The hippopotamus' legs were not broken through some natural occurrence after it was placed in the tomb.

(E) The hippopotamus was originally placed upside down in the tomb.

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Originally posted by patto on 18 Feb 2019, 20:01.
Last edited by Bunuel on 18 Feb 2019, 21:29, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Museum curator: Our ancient Egyptian collection includes an earthenwar  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2019, 01:14
The reason why we choose D and not E is because it is not enough to check the position of the hippopotamus. We also need to know if the legs were broken before or after being placed there, only this can help with the conclusion the author drives at.

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Re: Museum curator: Our ancient Egyptian collection includes an earthenwar  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2019, 10:21
Quote:
Museum curator: Our ancient Egyptian collection includes an earthenware hippopotamus that resembles a child's toy. It was discovered in a tomb, upside down, with its legs broken off. We know that the ancient Egyptians believed the dead had to wage eternal war with beasts. Breaking the legs off a representation of an animal was thought to help a deceased person in this war. We conclude that, far from being a toy, this hippopotamus was a religious object.


Conclusion: This hippopotamus was a religious object not a toy.
Prethinking: What made the curator think that it was a religious object eventhough when he knows that its legs were broken and this is a representation of their ancient ritual. There is something the author is not telling us. May be its legs were broken accidentally. Then it would'nt mean representing an ancient ritual. That's why he is saying that it is a religious object.

Which one of the following is an assumption required by the curator's argument?


Quote:
(A) The tomb in which the hippopotamus was found was not the tomb of a child.

ok its not a child's tomb. so what? how is it helping us to reach the conclusion that it is a religious toy. Discard.

Quote:
(B) Earthenware figures were never used as children's toys in ancient Egypt.

ok they are never used. So, may be its not a toy. This statement is neither proving that it is a religious object nor disproving that its a representation of an ancient ritual.

Quote:
(C) The tomb in which the hippopotamus was found was not reentered from the time of burial until archaeologists opened it.

It does not matter whether the tomb was reentered or not because this is not telling us anything about the conclusion.

Quote:
(D) The hippopotamus' legs were not broken through some natural occurrence after it was placed in the tomb.

Negate the statement: The hippopotamus legs were broken through some natural occurence. That means, the Egyptian people did not do it as a part of ritual. Therefore, it must be a religious object.

Quote:
(E) The hippopotamus was originally placed upside down in the tomb

Does not affect the conclusion
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Re: Museum curator: Our ancient Egyptian collection includes an earthenwar   [#permalink] 24 Mar 2019, 10:21
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