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Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly

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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2018, 08:29
I am confused why we should use 'it' here. As per Manhattan SC, X and Y should follow with plural. So confused here
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New post 27 Oct 2018, 18:54
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
A. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found

I don't love the sound of this answer choice, but SC isn't ever about sound, so... whatever.

The "it" is perfect here. What are the singular nouns that precede "it"? "A language" is the only reasonable option -- and that makes perfect sense. "Those" generally works better with an antecedent of some sort, but it's basically just a synonym for "people" here, and that's acceptable. Keep (A).

Quote:
B. and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding

"Them" is confusing: does it refer to "dialects", "sub-languages," or all the way back to "languages" at the beginning of the sentence? I also can't figure out why we would want to conjoin these phrases with "with" -- that doesn't make much sense. (A) is much better, so (B) is out.

Quote:
C. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find

I'm cool with the first "it", but the second "it" doesn't work: "those who have tried counting the language..."? We're trying to count languages, and that needs to be plural. Eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found

Same problem with "them" as in answer choice (B). Plus, I don't see any good reason to use past tense here. The use of present perfect in (A) makes more sense, since people have presumably attempted to count languages in the past, and continue to do so in the present. (D) is gone.

Quote:
E. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding

Just a hybrid of the worst elements of (B) and (C). (E) is out, and (A) is correct.


I am now looking for ways to correct an incorrect option for my better understanding. If we remove "it" from answer choice C, is the sentence correct? which one will you prefer between "to count"vs "counting"? I am struggling with these kind of obvious dialemmas
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Feb 2019, 13:24
GMATNinja.

I have a concern in option A with the first "it".
Though I agree with your explanation but I still have a doubt

the said it is as well in the underlined portion of the sentence and we can never rule out the possibility or a path there. It therefore becomes difficult to assume that the stated "it" is correct and correctly refers to the singular language!
Can you please help enlighten!

Thanks


GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
A. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found

I don't love the sound of this answer choice, but SC isn't ever about sound, so... whatever.

The "it" is perfect here. What are the singular nouns that precede "it"? "A language" is the only reasonable option -- and that makes perfect sense. "Those" generally works better with an antecedent of some sort, but it's basically just a synonym for "people" here, and that's acceptable. Keep (A).

Quote:
B. and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding

"Them" is confusing: does it refer to "dialects", "sub-languages," or all the way back to "languages" at the beginning of the sentence? I also can't figure out why we would want to conjoin these phrases with "with" -- that doesn't make much sense. (A) is much better, so (B) is out.

Quote:
C. and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find

I'm cool with the first "it", but the second "it" doesn't work: "those who have tried counting the language..."? We're trying to count languages, and that needs to be plural. Eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found

Same problem with "them" as in answer choice (B). Plus, I don't see any good reason to use past tense here. The use of present perfect in (A) makes more sense, since people have presumably attempted to count languages in the past, and continue to do so in the present. (D) is gone.

Quote:
E. or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding

Just a hybrid of the worst elements of (B) and (C). (E) is out, and (A) is correct.
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New post 04 Feb 2019, 23:22
carajatarora wrote:
It therefore becomes difficult to assume that the stated "it" is correct and correctly refers to the singular language!

Hi Rajat, as long as you realize that the pronoun used at that place in the sentence is intended to refer to a singular noun (a language), then it is easy to understand that the correct pronoun usage is it and not them (because them can only refer to plural nouns).

This is really the only understanding that is required here.
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New post 10 Mar 2019, 15:48
I fail to understand why them can't refer to both "language and sub-languages". I've come across a rule which states that if a subject is of the form X and Y, it becomes plural. Sub-languages can also have dialects within. So why are we referring to language alone?
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Re: Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Mar 2019, 00:43
rarev22 wrote:
I fail to understand why them can't refer to both "language and sub-languages". I've come across a rule which states that if a subject is of the form X and Y, it becomes plural. Sub-languages can also have dialects within. So why are we referring to language alone?

Hi rarev22, the intent of the sentence is to convey that there is a difficulty of distinguishing between:
i) A language
ii) Sub-languages or dialects within a language

Since the intent is to refer to Sub-languages or dialects within a language, it is the correct pronoun.
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New post 04 Jun 2019, 10:35
I believe that even if we change option C to "and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically find" ---the option is still incorrect. May I know the reason. I know its related to tenses but can someone help me out in linking those tenses.
Also why to count is preferred over counting.
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New post 13 Jul 2019, 01:01
Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty of distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.


(A) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found

CORRECT ANSWER

(B) and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding

Counting : present perfect ( WRONG) Again Counting also Wrong

(C) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find

Counting is Wrong: The work is not still going on. So Wrong.

(D) or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found

Between X and Y : OR is wrong

(E) or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding

Between X and Y: Or in wrong
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New post 23 Aug 2019, 07:46
Quote:
Nobody knows exactly how many languages there are in the world, partly because of the difficulty of distinguishing between a language and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found about five thousand.


(A) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found
(B) and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding
(C) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find
(D) or the sub-languages or dialects within them, but those who tried to count them typically found
(E) or the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried to count typically finding


Idiom: Because X and Y. There is no and in D & E. Both are out.

Quote:
(B) and the sub-languages or dialects within them, with those who have tried counting typically finding

We need FANBOYS to connect the two clauses. B out.

Quote:
(A) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried to count typically have found
(C) and the sub-languages or dialects within it, but those who have tried counting it typically find


Only difference is "to count" vs "counting"
Now I am not sure if counting is Gerund or an Action Now. However that does not stop me to apply the concision rules

1. Verb > Action Noun > Noun
2. Noun > ING of (Complex Gerund) > ING (Gerund)


Using 1, "to count" is infinitive -> verb better than Counting (action noun or gerund)
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New post 11 Sep 2019, 05:22
Meaning  nobody knows how many languages are there or sublanguages, dialects but those who have counted it should be around 5k.
First split and or
Options D, E  Idiomatic usage  the correct idiom would be between … and
“And” is missing.
Second split them vs it. (a, b, c)
Diction, Tense missing
B  Typically finding  instead of "finding" verb should be there to complete the sentence.
Options remaining (a, c)
First part of the sentences is same. (And the sub-languages or dialects within it)
Option C  ”counting it”. “IT” is referring back to languages  pronoun agreement issue.
Tense “find” seems awkward as it denotes the general truth.


Hence, A is the Answer.
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