GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 13 Oct 2019, 15:43

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Parent: Pushing very young children into rigorous study in an effort

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
VP
VP
avatar
V
Joined: 30 Jan 2016
Posts: 1158
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Parent: Pushing very young children into rigorous study in an effort  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2019, 12:05
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  15% (low)

Question Stats:

80% (01:37) correct 20% (01:59) wrong based on 108 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Parent: Pushing very young children into rigorous study in an effort to make our nation more competitive does more harm than good. Curricula for these young students must address their special developmental needs, and while rigorous work in secondary school makes sense, the same approach in the early years of primary school produces only short-term gains and may cause young children to burn out on schoolwork. Using very young students as pawns in the race to make the nation economically competitive is unfair and may ultimately work against us.

Which one of the following can be inferred from the parent’s statements?

(A) For our nation to be competitive, our secondary school curriculum must include more rigorous study than it now does.
(B) The developmental needs of secondary school students are not now being addressed in our high schools.
(C) Our country can be competitive only if the developmental needs of all our students can be met.
(D) A curriculum of rigorous study does not adequately address the developmental needs of primary school students.
(E) Unless our nation encourages more rigorous study in the early years of primary school, we cannot be economically competitive.

_________________
Non progredi est regredi
Verbal Forum Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: Greatness begins beyond your comfort zone
Joined: 08 Dec 2013
Posts: 2401
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Strategy
Schools: Kelley '20, ISB '19
GPA: 3.2
WE: Information Technology (Consulting)
GMAT ToolKit User Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Parent: Pushing very young children into rigorous study in an effort  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2019, 22:12
Parent: Pushing very young children into rigorous study in an effort to make our nation more competitive does more harm than good. Curricula for these young students must address their special developmental needs, and while rigorous work in secondary school makes sense, the same approach in the early years of primary school produces only short-term gains and may cause young children to burn out on schoolwork. Using very young students as pawns in the race to make the nation economically competitive is unfair and may ultimately work against us.

Type-inference

(A) For our nation to be competitive, our secondary school curriculum must include more rigorous study than it now does. - Out of scope- the argument does not state anything about altering secondary school curriculum
(B) The developmental needs of secondary school students are not now being addressed in our high schools. - Out of scope- the argument states the developmental need of primary school children
(C) Our country can be competitive only if the developmental needs of all our students can be met. - Out of scope- too far a jump as the argument states the developmental need of primary school children
(D) A curriculum of rigorous study does not adequately address the developmental needs of primary school students.- Correct
Curricula for these young students must address their special developmental needs, and while rigorous work in secondary school makes sense, the same approach in the early years of primary school produces only short-term gains and may cause young children to burn out on schoolwork.
(E) Unless our nation encourages more rigorous study in the early years of primary school, we cannot be economically competitive.- incorrect; the argument does not claim that rigorous study in the early years of primary school is a necessary condition

Answer D
_________________
When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it. - Henry Ford
The Moment You Think About Giving Up, Think Of The Reason Why You Held On So Long
Director
Director
avatar
G
Joined: 09 Mar 2018
Posts: 997
Location: India
Re: Parent: Pushing very young children into rigorous study in an effort  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 25 Jan 2019, 22:34
Akela wrote:
Parent: Pushing very young children into rigorous study in an effort to make our nation more competitive does more harm than good. Curricula for these young students must address their special developmental needs, and while rigorous work in secondary school makes sense, the same approach in the early years of primary school produces only short-term gains and may cause young children to burn out on schoolwork. Using very young students as pawns in the race to make the nation economically competitive is unfair and may ultimately work against us.

Which one of the following can be inferred from the parent’s statements?

(A) For our nation to be competitive, our secondary school curriculum must include more rigorous study than it now does.
(B) The developmental needs of secondary school students are not now being addressed in our high schools.
(C) Our country can be competitive only if the developmental needs of all our students can be met.
(D) A curriculum of rigorous study does not adequately address the developmental needs of primary school students.
(E) Unless our nation encourages more rigorous study in the early years of primary school, we cannot be economically competitive.


So Inline is my reasoning.

The whole argument is on a parent's perspective.

High school students do rigorous work in secondary school this makes sense
But Young children, No. They should not be overloaded with homework.
If a country wants to improve it should not overload the young school children with tremendous workload.

(A) For our nation to be competitive, our secondary school curriculum must include more rigorous study than it now does.
It went ahead of the scope.

(B) The developmental needs of secondary school students are not now being addressed in our high schools.
They were not even the main players of this argument.

(C) Our country can be competitive only if the developmental needs of all our students can be met.
Nobody said this anywhere.

(D) A curriculum of rigorous study does not adequately address the developmental needs of primary school students.
Correct. It agrees with the tone of the author.

(E) Unless our nation encourages more rigorous study in the early years of primary school, we cannot be economically competitive.
Again this is too broad for this argument.
_________________
If you notice any discrepancy in my reasoning, please let me know. Lets improve together.

Quote which i can relate to.
Many of life's failures happen with people who do not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Parent: Pushing very young children into rigorous study in an effort   [#permalink] 25 Jan 2019, 22:34
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Parent: Pushing very young children into rigorous study in an effort

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne