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Preposition

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Preposition [#permalink]

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New post 10 Nov 2017, 05:03
Difference between appear as, appear to be and appear to?


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Magoosh GMAT Instructor
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Re: Preposition [#permalink]

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New post 10 Nov 2017, 16:43
Deepsacheti wrote:
Difference between appear as, appear to be and appear to?


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Dear Deepsacheti,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

Here are some free GMAT Idiom Flashcards.

Briefly
to appear as = this might be used of an actor
Actor X appeared as the evil villain in that movie.

appear+ [infinitive] = a general idiom describing circumstances
A appears to have something against B.
C appears to be winning the race.
D appears to dislike Brussel sprouts.

This idiom is likely to be used on the GMAT SC. It denotes something that we think is true, but there's a lack of certainty or clarity.

appear to (using "to" as a proposition) --
This idiom is rare and would not appear on the GMAT. The context would be something such as a ghost or angel or other normally unseen being suddenly coming into someone's view:
The ghost of Christmas Past appeared to Scrooge.
E claimed that an angel had appeared to him when he was on the battlefield.


Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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Re: Preposition   [#permalink] 10 Nov 2017, 16:43
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