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QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age

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QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2017, 08:48
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Verbal Question of The Day: Day 24: Critical Reasoning


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The popular belief that a snake's age can be determined by counting the number of layers of scales on its body is generally true. However, to help regulate its internal temperature, the black mamba snake often sheds its outermost layers of scales when the temperature exceeds approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving the snake with fewer layers of scales than it would otherwise have. Thus, if a black mamba snake has frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit, counting the number of layers of scales on its body will most likely result in an inaccurate calculation of the snake's age.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument is based?

A) A black mamba snake must be exposed to temperatures above 120 degrees Fahrenheit for several hours before shedding its outermost layers of scales.
B) A black mamba snake will not consistently regenerate the layers of scales it sheds after exposure to high temperatures.
C) All black mamba snakes that have frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit have shed at least one layer of scales.
D) Exposure to temperatures exceeding approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit is the only environmental factor that triggers black mamba snake to shed its outermost layers of scales.
E) The black mamba snake grows no more than two new layers of scales on its body each year.

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QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2017, 08:50
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On strengthen, weaken, or assumption questions, I always like to start with a nice, clear restatement of the conclusion:

    "...if a black mamba snake has frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit, counting the number of layers of scales on its body will most likely result in an inaccurate calculation of the snake's age."

Great. And what's the reasoning the author used to reach this conclusion? We know the following:

  • Generally, a snake's age can be determined by counting the number of layers of scales on its body.
  • The black mamba snake often sheds its outermost layers of scales when the temperature exceeds approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving the snake with fewer layers of scales than it would otherwise have.

So apparently, the black mamba grows layers of scales at a constant rate as it ages, but will lose some of those layers if it's exposed to high temperatures. And we're looking for something that will reinforce the conclusion that "counting the number of layers of scales on its body will most likely result in an inaccurate calculation of the snake's age."



Quote:
A) A black mamba snake must be exposed to temperatures above 120 degrees Fahrenheit for several hours before shedding its outermost layers of scales.

The author's argument is based on the premise that "to help regulate its internal temperature, the black mamba snake often sheds its outermost layers of scales when the temperature exceeds approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit." At best, (A) is irrelevant, because it wouldn't do anything to impact whether we can accurately determine the snake's age.

But you could also argue that statement (A) would actually weaken the author's argument. For example, consider the black mamba snake that has been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit four times in its life. The author would expect that this snake lost its outermost layer of scales each of those four times. But what if the snake was only exposed to those high temperatures for an hour each time? If statement (A) were true, that snake would not have shed its outermost layers of scales, and counting the number of layers of scales would likely result in an accurate calculation of the snake's age.

Either way, choice (A) can be eliminated.

Quote:
B) A black mamba snake will not consistently regenerate the layers of scales it sheds after exposure to high temperatures.

If a black mamba consistently regenerates the layers of scales that it sheds after exposure to high temperatures, then exposure to high temperatures would have no effect on the number of layers of scales that the snake has. For example, a five-year-old black mamba might normally have 10 layers of scales. If that black mamba lost four layers of scales because of exposure to high temperatures, the author would expect that snake to only have six layers of scales. But if the snake regenerated each layer of scales that it lost, then the snake would indeed have 10 layers and counting the number of layers of scales would likely result in an accurate calculation of the snake's age.

Thus, the author's argument relies on the fact that the black mamba will NOT consistently regenerate the scales it sheds after exposure to high temperatures. Choice (B) is therefore a necessary assumption, and it looks pretty good.

Quote:
C) All black mamba snakes that have frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit have shed at least one layer of scales.

The author does not claim that exposure to high temperatures causes ALL black mamba snakes to shed at least one layer of scales. Rather, the author states that "the black mamba snake often sheds its outermost layers of scales when the temperature exceeds approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit" (often, not always). Thus, the author's argument does not rely on the assumption stated in choice (C).

Quote:
D) Exposure to temperatures exceeding approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit is the only environmental factor that triggers black mamba snake to shed its outermost layers of scales.

Because "the black mamba snake often sheds its outermost layers of scales when the temperature exceeds approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit", the author concludes that "if a black mamba snake has frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit, counting the number of layers of scales on its body will most likely result in an inaccurate calculation of the snake's age." Even if other environmental factors also trigger black mamba snakes to shed their outermost layers of scales, the author's argument, which is only concerned with exposure to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit, would not be impacted.

However, consider the following alternative conclusion: "if a black mamba snake has NOT frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit, then counting the number of layers of scales on its body will most likely result in an ACCURATE calculation of the snake's age." If the author had reached that conclusion instead, then the author's argument would have required making the assumption stated in choice (D). However, as is, the author's argument does not rely on the assumption stated in choice (D).

Quote:
E) The black mamba snake grows no more than two new layers of scales on its body each year.

It doesn't matter how many layers of scales a black mamba grows each year. As long as the number of layers grown per year is known, one could theoretically calculate the snake's age by counting the number of layers. Choice (E) is not a required assumption.

Choice (B) is the best answer.
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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2017, 09:05
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 24: Critical Reasoning


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The popular belief that a snake's age can be determined by counting the number of layers of scales on its body is generally true. However, to help regulate its internal temperature, the black mamba snake often sheds its outermost layers of scales when the temperature exceeds approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving the snake with fewer layers of scales than it would otherwise have. Thus, if a black mamba snake has frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit, counting the number of layers of scales on its body will most likely result in an inaccurate calculation of the snake's age.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument is based?

A) A black mamba snake must be exposed to temperatures above 120 degrees Fahrenheit for several hours before shedding its outermost layers of scales.
B) A black mamba snake will not consistently regenerate the layers of scales it sheds after exposure to high temperatures.
C) All black mamba snakes that have frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit have shed at least one layer of scales.
D) Exposure to temperatures exceeding approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit is the only environmental factor that triggers black mamba snake to shed its outermost layers of scales.
E) The black mamba snake grows no more than two new layers of scales on its body each year.

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IMO B
If the snake regenerates its scale consistently then counting the scales we can still determine the snake's age.
So the assumption must be that the snake does not do so.
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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2017, 10:06
B. If shedded layer of scale is replenished accordingly then the hypothesis still works fine

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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2017, 10:48
C.

Used assumption negation technique, negating C would make the argument invalid.

Pl. correct me if i am wrong.

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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2017, 10:53
I will go with C

Via assumption negation : If all black mamba snakes......shed no layer of scales then their age can be calculated...This makes the argument fall from the roof

hence C


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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2017, 13:47
chose B.
To me, B and D are contenders. Finally pick B using negation method
Wait for the OA
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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jun 2017, 15:06
Using negation, option B totally breaks the conclusion. But C doesn't really break it ie. Not all black Mamba snakes...can be 0 to 99. Inconclusive negation I say.

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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jun 2017, 06:52
In my opinion the answer must be option B. My take -

Premise -

1) The popular belief that the age of a snake can be determined by calculating number of scales on its body is generally true.
2) However, to help regulate its internal temperature, the black mamba snake often sheds its outermost layers of scales when the temperature exceeds approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving the snake with fewer layers of scales than it would otherwise have.

Conclusion -

Thus, if a black mamba snake has frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit, counting the number of layers of scales on its body will most likely result in an inaccurate calculation of the snake's age.

This is an assumption type of question.

Pre-think -

We need to think about factors that can falsify the conclusion at hand. May be the scales get regenerated ? Or may be there exists a model to account for the loss of scales due to heat.So a possible assumption could be the scales do not get regenerated.

POE-

Option A - How does the number of hours matter ? Out
Option B - On the lines of our pre-thinking - Hold
Option C - This does mention about shedding of scales and temperature. Contender.
Option D - Whether or not it is the only way is not our concern.
Option E - Number of layers is irrelevant.

Now B vs C -

Negate Option C - Not all black mamba snakes that have frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit have shed at least one layer of scales. May be some did , some did not ??? Negation fails

Hence the answer is option B.
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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2018, 01:58
I Chose Option D on the basis of cause and effect relation. ie.It's only to exposure to 120 degree heat that causes Black Mamba to shed it's layer's.
120 degrees Fahrenheit is the only environmental factor that triggers black mamba snake to shed its outermost layers of scales.

If we negate doesn't the conclusion fall apart. Doesn't this option needs to be true for the conclusion to follow, Please explain?
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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2018, 20:00
rajatgmat19 wrote:
I Chose Option D on the basis of cause and effect relation. ie.It's only to exposure to 120 degree heat that causes Black Mamba to shed it's layer's.
120 degrees Fahrenheit is the only environmental factor that triggers black mamba snake to shed its outermost layers of scales.

If we negate doesn't the conclusion fall apart. Doesn't this option needs to be true for the conclusion to follow, Please explain?

If we negate (D), then there might be OTHER environmental factors that can also trigger a black mamba snake to shed its outermost layers of scales. In that case, those other factors might also lead to an inaccurate calculation of the snake's age.

So what? Exposure to temperatures over 120 degrees will still cause the snake to shed a layer of scales, even if other factors can have the same effect. As long as high temperatures can cause the snake to shed a layer of scales, the author's logic and conclusion are still sound.

However, if the snake REGENERATES layers lost after exposure to high temperatures, then the argument falls apart.
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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 29 Mar 2018, 04:45
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 24: Critical Reasoning


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The popular belief that a snake's age can be determined by counting the number of layers of scales on its body is generally true. However, to help regulate its internal temperature, the black mamba snake often sheds its outermost layers of scales when the temperature exceeds approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving the snake with fewer layers of scales than it would otherwise have. Thus, if a black mamba snake has frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit, counting the number of layers of scales on its body will most likely result in an inaccurate calculation of the snake's age.

Which of the following is an assumption on which the argument is based?

A) A black mamba snake must be exposed to temperatures above 120 degrees Fahrenheit for several hours before shedding its outermost layers of scales.
B) A black mamba snake will not consistently regenerate the layers of scales it sheds after exposure to high temperatures.
C) All black mamba snakes that have frequently been exposed to temperatures exceeding 120 degrees Fahrenheit have shed at least one layer of scales.
D) Exposure to temperatures exceeding approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit is the only environmental factor that triggers black mamba snake to shed its outermost layers of scales.
E) The black mamba snake grows no more than two new layers of scales on its body each year.

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I marked (D) but now it seems it's too extreme because of "only".
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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2018, 16:22
B is the best choice. However, I was somewhat confused by the wording. The argument does not tell us what constitutes a high temperature, just that after 120F a particular snake performs some action. So in the answer choice how can we assume that high temperature means > 120F? Are we allowed to make such assumptions?
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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 06 Jul 2018, 19:59
shahMeet wrote:
B is the best choice. However, I was somewhat confused by the wording. The argument does not tell us what constitutes a high temperature, just that after 120F a particular snake performs some action. So in the answer choice how can we assume that high temperature means > 120F? Are we allowed to make such assumptions?

We are told that "the black mamba snake often sheds its outermost layers of scales when the temperature exceeds approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit."

Quote:
B) A black mamba snake will not consistently regenerate the layers of scales it sheds after exposure to high temperatures.

Even though (B) itself does not tell us what constitutes "high temperatures", we know from the passage that the shedding of scales due to heat exposure happens when the temperature exceeds approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit. In other words, (B) is simply referring to the heat-related phenomenon already described in the passage. You do not have to make any further assumptions here.

I hope that helps!
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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2018, 08:58
GMATNinja wrote:
rajatgmat19 wrote:
I Chose Option D on the basis of cause and effect relation. ie.It's only to exposure to 120 degree heat that causes Black Mamba to shed it's layer's.
120 degrees Fahrenheit is the only environmental factor that triggers black mamba snake to shed its outermost layers of scales.

If we negate doesn't the conclusion fall apart. Doesn't this option needs to be true for the conclusion to follow, Please explain?

If we negate (D), then there might be OTHER environmental factors that can also trigger a black mamba snake to shed its outermost layers of scales. In that case, those other factors might also lead to an inaccurate calculation of the snake's age.

So what? Exposure to temperatures over 120 degrees will still cause the snake to shed a layer of scales, even if other factors can have the same effect. As long as high temperatures can cause the snake to shed a layer of scales, the author's logic and conclusion are still sound.

However, if the snake REGENERATES layers lost after exposure to high temperatures, then the argument falls apart.


HI GMATNinja Sir,

I got a bit confused with D and its negation, As you mentioned that cause of negation we can achieve what we want. which is that age will be inaccurate. Even this way I see both choices are parallel in logic. (B and D). Although i chose B, and eliminated D as out of scope, but this way it seems to be a contender.
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Re: QOTD: The popular belief that a snake's age   [#permalink] 11 Jul 2018, 08:58
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