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Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are

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Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are [#permalink]

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Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are still puzzled as to how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge over such a great distance without machinery.

A. scientists are still puzzled as to how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge over such a great distance without machinery.
B. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge are still puzzling to scientists because of how the ancient Britons managed to transport them over such a great distance without machinery.
C. scientists are still puzzled by how the prehistoric Britons managed the transportation of the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge without machinery over such a great distance.
D. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge still puzzle scientists, who wonder how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport them over such a great distance without machinery.
E. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge are still a puzzle to scientists due to being transported over such a great distance without machinery.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: MGMAT: Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2010, 11:01
"Quarried" -----> can only apply to massive stone blocks. Only B, D and E left.

B : "puzzling" is present progressive. The question used to puzzle scientists, its puzzling scientists and will likely to puzzle them in the future. You have to use simple present tense - puzzle.

For example -
Sun rises in the East. ----> It used to rise in the East. It is rising in the East. Tomorrow it will rise in the East. Present tense is the best way to state a fact.

D : Answer

E : "being" OUT

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Re: MGMAT: Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2010, 11:20
what is the antecedent of "them" in option "D"??? :shock: I tried too much to convince myself that "them" is used correctly in option D, but couldn't.
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Re: MGMAT: Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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I wouldn't worry too much bcos it appears in both B and D. E is hopeless because its passive - "due to being"

D. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge still puzzle scientists, who wonder how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport them over such a great distance without machinery.

"them" refers to massive stone blocks. Prehistoric Britons cannot transport today's scientists.

Hussain15 wrote:
what is the antecedent of "them" in option "D"??? :shock: I tried too much to convince myself that "them" is used correctly in option D, but couldn't.

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Re: MGMAT: Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2010, 01:43
A and C are out because Modifier doesn't modify scientists.

E is wrong because it is awkward and being is used.

between B and D, both options use them for massive stone block but as B is awkward. "D" is correct ans.

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Re: MGMAT: Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2010, 04:37
Hussain15 wrote:
what is the antecedent of "them" in option "D"??? :shock: I tried too much to convince myself that "them" is used correctly in option D, but couldn't.



A clear case of reflexive pronoun !!!

In this case for correct choice D.... "THEM" clearly refer to massive stone blocks of Stonehenge

In case we needed to refer to "prehistoric Britons " then "THEMSELVES (reflexive pronoun) should have been used....So no ambiguity here !!!

Hope this helps !!!
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Re: MGMAT: Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2010, 10:45
IMO D...

them is a case of reflexive pronoun... referring to the stones..
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Re: MGMAT: Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2010, 08:59
D for me.

it is between B, D and E because "Quarried from a site over five miles away" modifies "the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge"

B and E are incorrect. D it is.

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Re: Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are [#permalink]

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New post 02 Aug 2013, 23:59
I am still confused what is the verb in the sentence D ???

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Re: Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are [#permalink]

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venkat18290 wrote:
I am still confused what is the verb in the sentence D ???


puzzle is acting as a verb.

please refer this :
https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/puzzle

hope it helps
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Re: MGMAT: Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2014, 16:42
nusmavrik wrote:
I wouldn't worry too much bcos it appears in both B and D. E is hopeless because its passive - "due to being"

D. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge still puzzle scientists, who wonder how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport them over such a great distance without machinery.

"them" refers to massive stone blocks. Prehistoric Britons cannot transport today's scientists.

Hussain15 wrote:
what is the antecedent of "them" in option "D"??? :shock: I tried too much to convince myself that "them" is used correctly in option D, but couldn't.


I'm a little confused by the same point -- is there *SOME* ambiguity there with the word "them"? I mean, logically, yes, "them" refers to stone blocks but can't it refer to scientist's as well despite the ",who" which always modifies scientists.

Thanks!

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Re: MGMAT: Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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New post 26 May 2014, 20:00
russ9 wrote:
nusmavrik wrote:
I wouldn't worry too much bcos it appears in both B and D. E is hopeless because its passive - "due to being"

D. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge still puzzle scientists, who wonder how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport them over such a great distance without machinery.

"them" refers to massive stone blocks. Prehistoric Britons cannot transport today's scientists.

Hussain15 wrote:
what is the antecedent of "them" in option "D"??? :shock: I tried too much to convince myself that "them" is used correctly in option D, but couldn't.


I'm a little confused by the same point -- is there *SOME* ambiguity there with the word "them"? I mean, logically, yes, "them" refers to stone blocks but can't it refer to scientist's as well despite the ",who" which always modifies scientists.


Thanks!

Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are still puzzled as to how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge over such a great distance without machinery.

A. scientists are still puzzled as to how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge over such a great distance without machinery.
B. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge are still puzzling to scientists because of how the ancient Britons managed to transport them over such a great distance without machinery.
C. scientists are still puzzled by how the prehistoric Britons managed the transportation of the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge without machinery over such a great distance.
D. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge still puzzle scientists, who wonder how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport them over such a great distance without machinery.
E. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge are still a puzzle to scientists due to being transported over such a great distance without machinery.


For this question the answer is D and if you observe carefully, them here can stand only for stone blocks.
Incase you replace them with scientists, the sentence will not make sense. Let's look at option B and D

"the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge are still puzzling to scientists because of how the ancient Britons managed to transport scientists (them) over such a great distance without machinery.

"the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge still puzzle scientists, who wonder how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport scientists (them) over such a great distance without machinery.

Usually pronouns they/which/whose/who/that refer to immediately preceding noun. Note it is not always but in most cases. who refers to scientists in option D

Hope it helps
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Re: MGMAT: Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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New post 27 May 2014, 17:45
WoundedTiger wrote:
russ9 wrote:
I'm a little confused by the same point -- is there *SOME* ambiguity there with the word "them"? I mean, logically, yes, "them" refers to stone blocks but can't it refer to scientist's as well despite the ",who" which always modifies scientists.


Thanks!

Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are still puzzled as to how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge over such a great distance without machinery.

A. scientists are still puzzled as to how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge over such a great distance without machinery.
B. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge are still puzzling to scientists because of how the ancient Britons managed to transport them over such a great distance without machinery.
C. scientists are still puzzled by how the prehistoric Britons managed the transportation of the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge without machinery over such a great distance.
D. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge still puzzle scientists, who wonder how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport them over such a great distance without machinery.
E. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge are still a puzzle to scientists due to being transported over such a great distance without machinery.


For this question the answer is D and if you observe carefully, them here can stand only for stone blocks.
Incase you replace them with scientists, the sentence will not make sense. Let's look at option B and D

"the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge are still puzzling to scientists because of how the ancient Britons managed to transport scientists (them) over such a great distance without machinery.

"the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge still puzzle scientists, who wonder how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport scientists (them) over such a great distance without machinery.

Usually pronouns they/which/whose/who/that refer to immediately preceding noun. Note it is not always but in most cases. who refers to scientists in option D

Hope it helps


Hi WoundedTiger,

You bring up a really interesting point that I wonder if you can further clarify, or perhaps debunk my misconception.

- I understood pronoun ambiguity as such -- IF I can attach a pronoun(them in option D), to ANY noun, then it's ambiguous, especially if that attachment does NOT make sense. That being said, what I understood from your comment above is -- pronoun is ONLY ambiguous if it can be attached to two separate nouns and they both make sense. Is that correct? So if there is a "who" and there are two things -- a person and a thing then the "who" is not ambiguous because it can only refer to the person. Is that what you're saying here?

- Since "who" refers to the scientists(which I can clearly see), does that mean that another pronoun HAS to refer to a DIFFERENT noun, even if it makes logical sense to refer to the "scientists"?

Thanks!

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Re: MGMAT: Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2014, 01:59
pronoun is ONLY ambiguous if it can be attached to two separate nouns and they both make sense. Is that correct?


Yes. This is correct. It should make sense with only 1 noun. But, in the real exam,it may not be that easy and therefore..you will also need to look at another error in the sentence. This is a good pointer. Especially for these 6 nouns it/which/they/them/who/whose. These pronoun usually refer to immediate preceding noun but in some questions you will see that it can jump over a prepositional phrase(because prepositional phrase cannot be placed anywhere else in the sentence) and modify the noun.

Check out the article from e-gmat as well.
noun-modifiers-can-modify-slightly-far-away-noun-135868.html

You will also come across some questions where the usage of it is bit ambiguous as you don't see a pronoun clearly. There are few question where I have faltered on..check out the link
the-ground-swell-of-public-opinion-made-it-inevitable-that-138509.html#p1119587

- Since "who" refers to the scientists(which I can clearly see), does that mean that another pronoun HAS to refer to a DIFFERENT noun, even if it makes logical sense to refer to the "scientists"?


Note: who can only refer to people and cannot refer to thing. Thus, you are right in your assessment.

Having said that, your doubt of another pronoun referring to another noun is not always correct. If the sentence is long enough and the subject of the sentence becomes an object of the sentence then the different pronoun (object) may be referring to the same noun. But, usually this should not be the case. If you come across a sentence that type, you can always post and get your answer.

For more on this, you may put a
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Quarried from a site over five miles away [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2014, 03:31
Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are still puzzled as to how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge over such a great distance without machinery.

A. scientists are still puzzled as to how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge over such a great distance without machinery.
B. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge are still puzzling to scientists because of how the ancient Britons managed to transport them over such a great distance without machinery.
C. scientists are still puzzled by how the prehistoric Britons managed the transportation of the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge without machinery over such a great distance.
D. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge still puzzle scientists, who wonder how the prehistoric Britons managed to transport them over such a great distance without machinery.
E. the massive stone blocks of Stonehenge are still a puzzle to scientists due to being transported over such a great distance without machinery.

Source: Carcass & Souvik meaning SC

Please help to clarify the meaning of option D. Since the relative pronoun modifier is placed after the comma, it is a non-restrictive modifier, isn't it? If it is the case, the meaning of option D will change, right?
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Re: Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are [#permalink]

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Re: Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are [#permalink]

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Re: Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2017, 13:33
My answer is D....

Firstly, the noun modifier initially modifies the noun stones not the scientists so stones should follow it, thus...

A and C are eliminated

E sounds awkward remove it...
now if we look at B present continuous followed by simple past never heard of it plus "puzzling to scientists" that also sounds awkward while as

In D
if main clause is simple present then the dependent clause can be simple past if "it shows a past time action" that is a rule


here, scientists are discussing now (simple present) about an incident already happened in past so (simple past)
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Re: Quarried from a site over five miles away, scientists are   [#permalink] 28 Sep 2017, 13:33
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