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Question about as a result of/ resulting

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Senior Manager
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Joined: 19 Mar 2008
Posts: 352

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Question about as a result of/ resulting [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2008, 19:25
Question about as a result of/ resulting

Hi all,

I am confused about the proper use of as a result of/ resulting from. I feel the both are interchangeable.

(1) The building collapsed as a result of the earthquake.
(2) The building collapsed resulting from the earthquake.
(3) Resulting from the earthquake, the building collapsed.
(4) As a result of the earthquake, the building collapsed.

I think they are all similar, but I feel that:
(2) is wrong, just sounds awkward to me
(3) is wrong, because the modifier “resulting from the earthquake” should modify the collapse, rather than building. So, the (2) should be rewrite as “Resulting from the earthquake, the collapse of the building occurred.

(1) and (4) are ok.

Do you have any idea? And examples to share so that I can see the difference?

Tks all

Kudos [?]: 67 [0], given: 0

Senior Manager
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Posts: 286

Kudos [?]: 112 [0], given: 0

Re: Question about as a result of/ resulting [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2008, 19:50
judokan wrote:
Question about as a result of/ resulting

Hi all,

I am confused about the proper use of as a result of/ resulting from. I feel the both are interchangeable.

(1) The building collapsed as a result of the earthquake.
(2) The building collapsed resulting from the earthquake.
(3) Resulting from the earthquake, the building collapsed.
(4) As a result of the earthquake, the building collapsed.

I think they are all similar, but I feel that:
(2) is wrong, just sounds awkward to me
(3) is wrong, because the modifier “resulting from the earthquake” should modify the collapse, rather than building. So, the (2) should be rewrite as “Resulting from the earthquake, the collapse of the building occurred.

(1) and (4) are ok.

Do you have any idea? And examples to share so that I can see the difference?

Tks all

I have a very nice input from my logs
* ref#manhattan forum


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
i will, however, point out one thing of enormous importance that you haven't addressed here at all, which is the presence/absence of a COMMA after the main clause (the thing you've written s+v+o).
if there's NO COMMA before a participle, then the participle creates an adjective phrase that modifies the noun immediately preceding.
if there's a COMMA before a participle, then the participle creates an adverb phrase that modifies the action of the preceding clause.
examples:
joe picked the fruit hanging from the tree. <-- joe, who was probably on solid ground, picked the fruit that was hanging from the tree.

joe picked the fruit, hanging from the tree. <-- joe was hanging from the tree while he picked the fruit. for instance, i think that the following sentence is perfectly fine:
the pedestrian was hit by a car, sustaining multiple major injuries
although it would probably be better written as
the pedestrian was hit by a car and sustained multiple major injuries
i think that, as long as the 'verb-ing adverb phrase' refers properly to the action in the main clause (whether that action is in the active or the passive), you're fine.

well, i don't like to endorse any statement involving the word 'always', especially when it comes to english grammar - but here are a couple of guidelines:

if the participial phrase comes before the verb of the main clause, then you usually can check it with the rule that you're propounding:
(1) joe, racing down the wet sidewalk, slipped and fell.
(2) racing down the wet sidewalk, joe slipped and fell.
either of these sentences means the same thing as 'joe slipped and fell as/while he was racing down the wet sidewalk'. by contrast, trying to place the participle after the verb - joe slipped and fell, racing down the sidewalk - yields a sentence that doesn't make any sense.

on the other hand, if the participial phrase comes after the verb of the main clause, then it usually expresses a result and thus can't be checked with your rule:
(3) the bodybuilder ate a 3000-calorie dinner, bringing his calorie intake for the day to 7000.




Kudos [?]: 112 [0], given: 0

Re: Question about as a result of/ resulting   [#permalink] 25 Aug 2008, 19:50
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