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Joined: 15 Jul 2009
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New post 15 Jul 2009, 13:15
After many delays and haphazard attempts, I am ready to start prepping for the GMAT exam. I had the opportunity to review these forums and it’s wealth of information, which I will take the time to go through (slowly).

A bit about about me, I am 28 year old, male, and have 4 years of work experience in Non-profit Finance, and I run a business on the side. I am looking to do the best I can on the GMAT exam, which means a 700+ score. It has been a while since I have studied math and verbal but I am ready to dive in.

So far, I have the following books sitting on my desk:

- Manhattan GMAT 3rd edition guides (8 Books)
- OG 11 and the Math/Verbal Guide
- Kaplan800


My plan is to go through the Manhattan books as a refresher, while attacking the OC problems as I complete each guide. After I finish that, I’ll work on Kaplan800.

Now my questions for you all:

- How much time do you guys devote on weekly basis? I’m trying to do 15-20 hours a week. Anything more would cut into my work performance, business profits.
- How do you guys retain the information, particularly math formulas? I was thinking of: 1. reading the Manhattan GMAT guide per chapter, jotting down the formula, doing the questions at the end of each chapter, checking them for errors and then going through book in this fashion. At the end of each guide, I will review the formulas before answering the OG questions. Makes sense?
- Since I am a native English speaker, I imagine my verbal will be stronger than math, but how did you guys learn the idioms?

I took a Manhattan GMAT practice test and scored a 560 so I have my work cut out for me. Any and all advice will be most appreciated, I look forward to being part of this great community as the GMAT prep heats up
_________________

Before success comes in any man's life he is sure to meet with much temporary defeat and, perhaps, some failures. When defeat overtakes a man, the easiest and most logical thing to do is to quit. That is exactly what the majority of men do.

- Napoleon Hill

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Location: United States (CA)
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New post 15 Jul 2009, 13:50
Boston2009 wrote:

So far, I have the following books sitting on my desk:

- Manhattan GMAT 3rd edition guides (8 Books)
- OG 11 and the Math/Verbal Guide
- Kaplan800


My plan is to go through the Manhattan books as a refresher, while attacking the OC problems as I complete each guide. After I finish that, I’ll work on Kaplan800.

Now my questions for you all:

- How much time do you guys devote on weekly basis? I’m trying to do 15-20 hours a week. Anything more would cut into my work performance, business profits.
- How do you guys retain the information, particularly math formulas? I was thinking of: 1. reading the Manhattan GMAT guide per chapter, jotting down the formula, doing the questions at the end of each chapter, checking them for errors and then going through book in this fashion. At the end of each guide, I will review the formulas before answering the OG questions. Makes sense?
- Since I am a native English speaker, I imagine my verbal will be stronger than math, but how did you guys learn the idioms?

I took a Manhattan GMAT practice test and scored a 560 so I have my work cut out for me. Any and all advice will be most appreciated, I look forward to being part of this great community as the GMAT prep heats up


Those books should be sufficient to get you on your way, but the Kaplan 800 book hasn't received great reviews.

To answer your questions,
1) I believe that 15-20 hours/week is a good amount of time to dedicate to the GMAT. Make sure you've got a good study plan though. The amount of time required to study for the GMAT varies with each individual, but 2-3 months seems to be a good target.

2) You retain information by practicing regularly and reviewing your performance. It's important to understand why you answered a question wrong or why you got it right. There are some things you'll need to memorize for the exam, such as squares, sqrt(2), sqrt(3), Pythagorean triplets, and the dimensions of the various triangles. You aren't required to know many formulas, but you will need to know Areas, Circumference, Volume, etc. These formulas won't require much time for memorization because you'll use them so frequently in your practice questions that you'll memorize them passively.

3) Even as a native English speaker, there are many idioms that sound awkward, primarily because we don't always use them in speech. There are two ways to learn these idioms: (1) study idioms lists, like the one in your MGMAT book, or (2) learn from getting them wrong on practice questions. Of course, the best approach to learn idioms is to combine both of these methods.

Taking your score from 560 to 700+ is definitely possible, but it won't be easy. Be sure to identify your weak areas, map out your study plan, and keep a detailed log of questions that you've missed. Be sure to ask for help on GMAT Club if you find yourself struggling.

Good Luck
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Kudos [?]: 286 [0], given: 86

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avatar
Joined: 15 Jul 2009
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Kudos [?]: [0], given: 1

Location: Boston, MA
Schools: BC (PT), NYU (PT), Oxford, Cambridge, IMD
Re: Retention of Information [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jul 2009, 15:38
Avernusaur wrote:
Boston2009 wrote:

So far, I have the following books sitting on my desk:

- Manhattan GMAT 3rd edition guides (8 Books)
- OG 11 and the Math/Verbal Guide
- Kaplan800


My plan is to go through the Manhattan books as a refresher, while attacking the OC problems as I complete each guide. After I finish that, I’ll work on Kaplan800.

Now my questions for you all:

- How much time do you guys devote on weekly basis? I’m trying to do 15-20 hours a week. Anything more would cut into my work performance, business profits.
- How do you guys retain the information, particularly math formulas? I was thinking of: 1. reading the Manhattan GMAT guide per chapter, jotting down the formula, doing the questions at the end of each chapter, checking them for errors and then going through book in this fashion. At the end of each guide, I will review the formulas before answering the OG questions. Makes sense?
- Since I am a native English speaker, I imagine my verbal will be stronger than math, but how did you guys learn the idioms?

I took a Manhattan GMAT practice test and scored a 560 so I have my work cut out for me. Any and all advice will be most appreciated, I look forward to being part of this great community as the GMAT prep heats up


Those books should be sufficient to get you on your way, but the Kaplan 800 book hasn't received great reviews.

To answer your questions,
1) I believe that 15-20 hours/week is a good amount of time to dedicate to the GMAT. Make sure you've got a good study plan though. The amount of time required to study for the GMAT varies with each individual, but 2-3 months seems to be a good target.

2) You retain information by practicing regularly and reviewing your performance. It's important to understand why you answered a question wrong or why you got it right. There are some things you'll need to memorize for the exam, such as squares, sqrt(2), sqrt(3), Pythagorean triplets, and the dimensions of the various triangles. You aren't required to know many formulas, but you will need to know Areas, Circumference, Volume, etc. These formulas won't require much time for memorization because you'll use them so frequently in your practice questions that you'll memorize them passively.

3) Even as a native English speaker, there are many idioms that sound awkward, primarily because we don't always use them in speech. There are two ways to learn these idioms: (1) study idioms lists, like the one in your MGMAT book, or (2) learn from getting them wrong on practice questions. Of course, the best approach to learn idioms is to combine both of these methods.

Taking your score from 560 to 700+ is definitely possible, but it won't be easy. Be sure to identify your weak areas, map out your study plan, and keep a detailed log of questions that you've missed. Be sure to ask for help on GMAT Club if you find yourself struggling.

Good Luck


Thank you for such a detailed response.

1. My study plan is to basically go through each and every MGMAT book meaning answering every question in the chapters and the selected OG questions. I'm starting with Book 5 - Geometry (my weakest area) and working my way down on the math. With Verbal, I am starting with Critical Reasoning - Book 6 and working my way up. Since I am stronger in Verbal than Math, I am going to do 2 Math Chapters per 1 Verbal Chapter.

2. I am so glad to hear that the formulas will be memorized passively! Funny you mentioned many Geometry related formulas because that is the first book that I am working on and I seem to be overwhelmed by the formula list. MGMAT books have pretty good explanations and I'll try to pop in here to check with others if I need help.

3. Hmm, I would love to minimize the memorization part, but I guess I could split up the list and try to memorize each week. I just remember my old grammer school teacher saying "had had" is an appropriate term depending on the sentence :-D

Do you recommend any other prep guides or books that might in congruence with the Manhattan GMAT prep guides? What I mean to say is that the additional prep books should build on MGMAT knowledge and not reinvent the wheel (espicially in Math).

Thanks once again and congratulations on your GMAT score! I would be really happy with that score.
_________________

Before success comes in any man's life he is sure to meet with much temporary defeat and, perhaps, some failures. When defeat overtakes a man, the easiest and most logical thing to do is to quit. That is exactly what the majority of men do.

- Napoleon Hill

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Director
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Status: Badgerine!
Joined: 04 Oct 2008
Posts: 894

Kudos [?]: 286 [1], given: 86

Location: United States (CA)
Concentration: Entrepreneurship, Strategy
Schools: Michigan (Ross) - Class of 2013
GMAT 1: 770 Q50 V44
GPA: 3.3
WE: Project Management (Aerospace and Defense)
Reviews Badge
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New post 15 Jul 2009, 18:59
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Boston2009 wrote:
Do you recommend any other prep guides or books that might in congruence with the Manhattan GMAT prep guides? What I mean to say is that the additional prep books should build on MGMAT knowledge and not reinvent the wheel (espicially in Math).


The only math guide I've used from MGMAT is the 3rd Ed. Number Properties guide, so I can't say what it does or does not include. However, Total GMAT Math is a very comprehensive guide to GMAT math. It covers every concept tested on the Quant section and the answer explanations are very helpful. http://www.totalgmatmath.com/

TGM is an e-book, so printing can be a pain :x
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Kudos [?]: 286 [1], given: 86

Intern
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Joined: 15 Jul 2009
Posts: 11

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Location: Boston, MA
Schools: BC (PT), NYU (PT), Oxford, Cambridge, IMD
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New post 16 Jul 2009, 09:34
^
Thanks for the recommendation, I'll buy it after I am done with MGMAT. i want to stick with the MGMAT books and go through OG11 and then fill in the gaps with the Total GMAT Math.

I really appreciate your help.
_________________

Before success comes in any man's life he is sure to meet with much temporary defeat and, perhaps, some failures. When defeat overtakes a man, the easiest and most logical thing to do is to quit. That is exactly what the majority of men do.

- Napoleon Hill

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 1

Re: Retention of Information   [#permalink] 16 Jul 2009, 09:34
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