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S97-01

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S97-01  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2014, 01:51
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  55% (hard)

Question Stats:

58% (00:59) correct 42% (00:54) wrong based on 65 sessions

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Re S97-01  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Sep 2014, 01:51
Official Solution:


We cannot easily rephrase the question. Note that we may not need to know \(x\) in order to know how many factors it has.

Statement (1): INSUFFICIENT. Without knowing the value of \(n\), we cannot determine the number of factors \(x\) has.

Statement (2): INSUFFICIENT. This statement by itself is unconnected to the question, because the statement involves only the variable \(n\), whereas the question only involves the variable \(x\).

Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER: SUFFICIENT. First, we should analyze the second statement further, to see whether we can find a unique value of \(n\).

Since \(n\) is a positive integer, we can test simple positive integers in an organized fashion, checking for equality of the two sides of the equation.

\(1^1 = 1 + 1\)? No.

\(2^2 = 2 + 2\)? Yes.

\(3^3 = 3 + 3\)? No.

\(4^4 = 4 + 4\)? No.

Notice that the left side of the equation is growing at a much faster rate than the right side, so the equation will not be true for any higher possible values of \(n\). Thus, we can determine that the value of \(n\) is 2.

Now, we do not know the value of \(p\), nor of \(x\), but we do now know that \(x = p^2\), with \(p\) as a prime number. Since a prime number has no factors other than 1 and itself, we can see that \(x\) has no factors other than 1, \(p\), and \(p^2\). Thus, \(x\) has exactly 3 factors, and we can answer the question definitively.


Answer: C
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Re: S97-01  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2017, 03:25
Combining statements 1 and 2, for all other prime numbers other than 1, the factors are 1, p, and p2. what if the prime number is 1, it has only 1 factor. so how is it definitive ? I would say both statements together are insufficient. Can you please explain ?

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New post 03 Jul 2017, 03:29
Ganeshsrinivasan wrote:
Combining statements 1 and 2, for all other prime numbers other than 1, the factors are 1, p, and p2. what if the prime number is 1, it has only 1 factor. so how is it definitive ? I would say both statements together are insufficient. Can you please explain ?

thanks


1 is NOT a prime number.

A Prime number is a positive integer with exactly two distinct positive divisors: 1 and itself. The smallest prime (and the only even prime) is therefore 2.

For more on Number Theory check the following post: https://gmatclub.com/forum/math-number- ... 88376.html
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Re S97-01  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Feb 2019, 00:12
What about 1 for a prime number? that only has 1 factor so you can not tell if it will have 3 or 1 factors. Not sufficient
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New post 01 Feb 2019, 00:14
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Re: S97-01   [#permalink] 01 Feb 2019, 00:14
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