GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 19 Mar 2019, 14:19

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
General GMAT Forum Moderator
avatar
V
Joined: 29 Jan 2015
Posts: 1169
Location: India
WE: General Management (Non-Profit and Government)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 02 Mar 2019, 06:19
1
1
Question 1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 193 sessions

47% (03:18) correct 53% (03:09) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 185 sessions

76% (00:56) correct 24% (01:05) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 180 sessions

99% (00:35) correct 1% (02:04) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 4
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 181 sessions

85% (00:45) correct 15% (00:46) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 5
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 176 sessions

76% (00:56) correct 24% (01:15) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists] exhibit numerous cutmarks, and they were often broken for the extraction of marrow. The implication is that the Klasies people consumed a wide range of game, from small, greyhound-size antelope like the Cape grysbok to more imposing quarry like buffalo and eland, as well as seals and penguins. The number and location of stone tool cutmarks and the rarity of carnivore tooth marks indicate that the people were not restricted to scavenging from lions or hyenas, and they often gained first access to the intact carcasses of even large mammals like buffalo and eland.

But the bones also show that the people tended to avoid confrontations with the more common—and more dangerous—buffalo to pursue a more docile but less common antelope, the eland. Both buffalo and eland are very large animals, but buffalo stand and resist potential predators, while eland panic and flee at signs of danger. The Klasies people did hunt buffalo, and a broken tip from a stone point is still imbedded in a neck vertebra of an extinct “giant” long-horned buffalo. The people focused, however, on the less threatening young or old members in buffalo herds.

The stone points found at Klasies could have been used to arm thrusting spears, but there is nothing to suggest that the people had projectiles that could be launched from a distance, and they may thus have limited their personal risk by concentrating on eland herds that could be chased to exhaustion or driven into traps. The numerous eland bones in the Klasies layers represent roughly the same proportion of prime-age adults that would occur in a living herd. This pattern suggests the animals were not victims of accidents or endemic diseases, which tend to selectively remove the very young and the old, but rather that they suffered a catastrophe that affected individuals of all ages equally. The deposits preserve no evidence of a great flood, volcanic eruption, or epidemic disease, and from an eland perspective, the catastrophe was probably the human ability to drive whole herds over nearby cliffs.
1. The main argument advanced by the author of this passage is

(A) It was easier for the Klasies people to hunt eland than buffalo.
(B) The Klasies were unique among prehistoric people in that they consumed large land animals, such as buffalo, as well as smaller mammals from the sea.
(C) The Klasies people were at least partially responsible for the catastrophic extinction of the prehistoric antelope called the eland.
(D) Because the Klasies people lacked the use of projectile weapons and were therefore unable to hunt buffalo successfully, they diversified their diet to include smaller prey.
(E) The prehistoric Klasies people had a diverse diet and advanced hunting skills and were probably not restricted to scavenging.

2. What signs indicate to the anthropologists that Klasies people were not restricted to scavenging?

(A) The number and location of stone tool cutmarks and the absence of carnivore teeth marks in the animal bones.
(B) The fact that the animals consumed were not the victims of accidents or disease as would be expected from natural deaths.
(C) The presence of a stone spear tip in the neck of a giant long-horned buffalo.
(D) The variety of different species whose bones were found in the Klasies camp, such as penguins, seals, and antelope.
(E) The lack of any evidence of a catastrophic event such as a flood, volcanic eruption, or epidemic disease.

3. According to the author’s theory, why did the Klasies people focus on eland instead of buffalo?

(A) The eland were more numerous than the buffalo.
(B) The eland would stand and fight while the buffalo would usually panic and flee.
(C) The buffalo would stand and fight while the eland would usually panic and flee.
(D) The eland were more easily obtained from other animals through scavenging.
(E) The eland were easily killed using the projectiles that the Klasies favored when hunting.

4. Which of the following game animals is NOT listed in the passage as a probable part of the Klasies diet?

(A) penguins
(B) hyenas
(C) seals
(D) giant long-horned buffalo
(E) small, greyhound-sized antelope

5. Which of the following evidence does the author present to support the assertion that the catastrophe the eland suffered was caused by human beings?

(A) The presence of bones from prime-age animals found in the Klasies site.
(B) The broken tip of a stone point embedded in the neck of an eland skeleton.
(C) The lack of any carnivore tooth marks on the eland bones at the Klasies site.
(D) The number and location of tool marks found on the bones of a variety of animals at the Klasies site.
(E) The lack of any signs of a flood, volcanic eruption, or epidemic disease.


_________________

If you liked my post, kindly give me a Kudos. Thanks.


Originally posted by rohan2345 on 08 May 2017, 06:16.
Last edited by gmat1393 on 02 Mar 2019, 06:19, edited 4 times in total.
Edited topic name and reformatted the question
Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 29 Jan 2015
Posts: 72
Location: India
Concentration: Marketing, Entrepreneurship
GPA: 3.7
WE: Information Technology (Internet and New Media)
Re: The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Jun 2018, 07:03
For the last ( no 5 ) question , How can I eliminate option A ?
" The numerous
eland bones in the Klasies layers represent
roughly the same proportion of prime-age adults
that would occur in a living herd. " ( too obvious )

If it is not A then must be E .
Thanks in advance .
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 09 Mar 2018
Posts: 5
Re: The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Jun 2018, 14:11
1
1 wrong 4correct 10 min
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 09 Mar 2018
Posts: 5
Re: The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Jun 2018, 14:15
soumya170293 wrote:
For the last ( no 5 ) question , How can I eliminate option A ?
" The numerous
eland bones in the Klasies layers represent
roughly the same proportion of prime-age adults
that would occur in a living herd. " ( too obvious )

If it is not A then must be E .
Thanks in advance .



because that is not talking about human , it basically shows that ( The numerous
eland bones in the Klasies layers represent
roughly the same proportion of prime-age adults
that would occur in a living herd.This pattern
suggests the animals were not victims of accidents
or endemic diseases, which tend to selectively
remove the very young and the old, but
rather that they suffered a catastrophe that
affected individuals of all ages equally
so it talks about ( individual of all ages , not about any relation with human )
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Dec 2017
Posts: 184
Location: India
Concentration: Strategy, Real Estate
Schools: Johnson '21
Re: The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Jun 2018, 19:43
2-What signs indicate to the anthropologists that Klasies people were not restricted to scavenging?

(A) The number and location of stone tool cutmarks and the absence of carnivore teeth marks in the animal bones.
(B) The fact that the animals consumed were not the victims of accidents or disease as would be expected from natural deaths.
(C) The presence of a stone spear tip in the neck of a giant long-horned buffalo.
(D) The variety of different species whose bones were found in the Klasies camp, such as penguins, seals, and antelope.
(E) The lack of any evidence of a catastrophic event such as a flood, volcanic eruption, or epidemic disease.

Option (A) says The number and location of stone tool cutmarks and the "absence" of carnivore teeth marks in the animal bones but according to the passage it's "rarity" of carnivore tooth marks. So how is option A correct? :?
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 01 Jan 2018
Posts: 135
Re: The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Jun 2018, 05:23
ArjunJag1328 wrote:
2-What signs indicate to the anthropologists that Klasies people were not restricted to scavenging?

(A) The number and location of stone tool cutmarks and the absence of carnivore teeth marks in the animal bones.
(B) The fact that the animals consumed were not the victims of accidents or disease as would be expected from natural deaths.
(C) The presence of a stone spear tip in the neck of a giant long-horned buffalo.
(D) The variety of different species whose bones were found in the Klasies camp, such as penguins, seals, and antelope.
(E) The lack of any evidence of a catastrophic event such as a flood, volcanic eruption, or epidemic disease.

Option (A) says The number and location of stone tool cutmarks and the "absence" of carnivore teeth marks in the animal bones but according to the passage it's "rarity" of carnivore tooth marks. So how is option A correct? :?

Nice observation. I think option A needs a correction.
_________________

kudos please if it helped you.

Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Feb 2018
Posts: 38
GRE 1: Q168 V156
Re: The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Jun 2018, 04:48
4/5 6 minutes. Good passage
Manager
Manager
User avatar
P
Status: Manager
Joined: 27 Oct 2018
Posts: 202
Location: Malaysia
Concentration: Strategy, International Business
GPA: 3.67
WE: Pharmaceuticals (Health Care)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Mar 2019, 14:45
rohan2345 wrote:
(E) The prehistoric Klasies people had a diverse diet and advanced hunting skills and were probably not restricted to scavenging.


for the first question:
1- there is no clue that Klasies people are prehistoric. (prehistoric: the period before written records)
2- eating meat from more than animal source doesn't mean diverse diet.
3- there is nothing about ADVANCED hunting SKILLS in the passage. On the contrary, the passage my suggest limited skills as the Klasies people only used only stone points, avoid aggressive animals such as lions and buffaloes, and didn't use ranged hunting tools.
4- from the passage, the Klasies people were not restricted to scavenging (NOT Probably)
_________________

..Thanks for KUDOS
Image

Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 03 Dec 2018
Posts: 105
Re: The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Mar 2019, 22:50
Question 1 option C vs E .Someone please explain.
CR Forum Moderator
avatar
D
Joined: 25 Apr 2018
Posts: 432
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Mar 2019, 09:04
1
mallya12 wrote:
Question 1 option C vs E .Someone please explain.

Quote:
The deposits preserve no evidence of a great flood, volcanic eruption, or epidemic disease, and from an eland perspective, the catastrophe was probably the human ability to drive whole herds over nearby cliffs.

mallya12 Please see the above, according to this humans were fully responsible for the extinction as opposed to choice C.hence, choice C is wrong.

On the other hand, option E encapsulates the whole main point of the passage.

Hope this helps!

Thanks
_________________

Please give kudos if you found my posts helpful!

Project CR Butler - 2 CR's everyday

GMAT Club Bot
Re: The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]   [#permalink] 02 Mar 2019, 09:04
Display posts from previous: Sort by

The animal bones [found in a region of Africa by the anthropologists]

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.