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Re: There are three boxes labelled A, B and C having a total weight of 150 [#permalink]
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aa008 wrote:
There are three boxes labelled A, B and C having a total weight of 150 kg. Find the weight of the heaviest box?

1) The sum of the weight of boxes A and B equals twice the weight of box C.
2) The weight of box A equals the sum of the weight of the boxes B and C.


Question: write down A + B + C = 150, heaviest = ?

Statement 1: This is 'GMAT code'. If the sum of A and B equals twice C, then C's weight is the average of A and B. Since there are only three boxes, that means C is 'right in the middle'. The problem is, we don't know whether A is the heavier box, or whether B is the heavier box. We also don't know whether the weights are (for instance) 1, 50, and 99, or 50, 50, and 50. (Interestingly, if they asked us for the weight of the middle box, this would be sufficient!)

Statement 2: Now we know that A is the heaviest, since it definitely has to be heavier than the other two. Also, since A weighs as much as the other two boxes put together, it must account for half of the total weight. A weighs 75 kg - the statement is sufficient.
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There are three boxes labelled A, B and C having a total weight of 150 [#permalink]
GMATPrepNow and ccooley

I am confused...

For S(2) what I also got \(A=B+C\) and \(A=75\) and \(B+C=75\), BUT nowhere is it mentioned that each box contains any weight...
Therfore it could also be that \(B=0\), in that case \(A\) and \(C\) would booth equal 75kg, therefore statement 2 is INSUFFICIENT.

Shouldn't the OA be C?

Only with both statements we know that \(A\) is not equal to \(C\)...

Can you help me out???
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Re: There are three boxes labelled A, B and C having a total weight of 150 [#permalink]
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T1101 wrote:
GMATPrepNow and ccooley

I am confused...

For S(2) what I also got \(A=B+C\) and \(A=75\) and \(B+C=75\), BUT nowhere is it mentioned that each box contains any weight...
Therfore it could also be that \(B=0\), in that case \(A\) and \(C\) would booth equal 75kg, therefore statement 2 is INSUFFICIENT.

Shouldn't the OA be C?

Only with both statements we know that \(A\) is not equal to \(C\)...

Can you help me out???


I guess to 100% ambiguity, the question COULD mention something about how the boxes weigh more than zero points.
That said, one might also argue that it's impossible for a box to have zero weight.
Then again, if the box contained balloons filled with helium, the box would have zero weight.

This isn't an official GMAT question, but my guess is that the official test-makers would be certain to remove any possible ambiguity.

Cheers,
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Re: There are three boxes labelled A, B and C having a total weight of 150 [#permalink]
aa008 wrote:
There are three boxes labelled A, B and C having a total weight of 150 kg. Find the weight of the heaviest box?

1) The sum of the weight of boxes A and B equals twice the weight of box C.
2) The weight of box A equals the sum of the weight of the boxes B and C.

Given: a+b+c=150 -----(i)

(1) a+b = 2c
therefore, c = 50 and a+b=100
case1: a = 50, b=50
case 2: a=70, b = 30
Not Sufficient

(2) a = b+c
Therefore, a = 75 and b+c = 75
Hence, a must be heaviest among the three. Sufficient

B is correct
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Re: There are three boxes labelled A, B and C having a total weight of 150 [#permalink]
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Re: There are three boxes labelled A, B and C having a total weight of 150 [#permalink]
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