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Through their selective funding of research projects, pharmaceutical companies exert too much influence upon medical research in universities. Only research proposals promising lucrative results are given serious consideration, and funding is usually awarded to scientists at large institutions who already have vast research experience. As a result, only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, and graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation. Research will continue to be conducted at the expense of human welfare.

The reasoning of the argument above depends upon which of the following assumptions?

As universities become primarily research institutions, teaching will be neglected.
Graduate students are not motivated by humane interests.
Smaller universities would be better suited to serve as product development laboratories for pharmaceutical companies.
Medical research should be funded by government-regulated foundations.
The interests of pharmaceutical companies and human welfare are usually incompatible in research.
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by abhimahna on 24 Apr 2017, 23:03, edited 2 times in total.
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New post 28 Aug 2009, 12:16
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Thanks for posting all these netcaesar +1 KUDOS to you!

IMO E
Argument is that Research done by Graduates influenced by interests Pharmaceutical companies is at the expense of human welfare. E makes this assumption. Pharmaceutcial company research could easily benefit human welfare as well, a tradeoff does not need to exist.

A - Out of Scope
B - Graduate students are only part of the puzzle. This assumption does not need to be made as they might be motivated by human interests but it really depends on what the pharameutical companies want.
C - Irrelevant to the argument
D - Irrelevant to the argument
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New post 28 Aug 2009, 20:20
+1 for E
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New post 29 Aug 2009, 10:23
IMO E too.
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New post 29 Aug 2009, 13:30
Clear E

Conclusion :-As a result, only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, and graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation.Research will continue to be conducted at the expense of human welfare.

and E is required for this conclusion
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New post 30 Aug 2009, 19:40
netcaesar wrote:
Through their selective funding of research projects, pharmaceutical companies exert too much influence upon medical research in universities. Only research proposals promising lucrative results are given serious consideration, and funding is usually awarded to scientists at large institutions who already have vast research experience. As a result, only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, and graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation. Research will continue to be conducted at the expense of human welfare.

The reasoning of the argument above depends upon which of the following assumptions?

As universities become primarily research institutions, teaching will be neglected.
Graduate students are not motivated by humane interests.
Smaller universities would be better suited to serve as product development laboratories for pharmaceutical companies.
Medical research should be funded by government-regulated foundations.
The interests of pharmaceutical companies and human welfare are usually incompatible in research.


E here as well. Is this OA?
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New post 30 Aug 2009, 22:37
go with E too.
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New post 07 May 2010, 05:26
I will go with B.

Whats the OA?
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netcaesar wrote:
IMO E

On dwelling on the text you will find that all pharmaceutical companies will invest on research promising lucrative results. This research will be at the expense of human welfare.
Clearly there is a gap here and it is filled by the assumption mentioned in E.


Through their selective funding of research projects, pharmaceutical companies exert too much influence upon medical research in universities. Only research proposals promising lucrative results are given serious consideration, and funding is usually awarded to scientists at large institutions who already have vast research experience. As a result, only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, and graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation. Research will continue to be conducted at the expense of human welfare.

The reasoning of the argument above depends upon which of the following assumptions?

As universities become primarily research institutions, teaching will be neglected.
Graduate students are not motivated by humane interests.
Smaller universities would be better suited to serve as product development laboratories for pharmaceutical companies.
Medical research should be funded by government-regulated foundations.
The interests of pharmaceutical companies and human welfare are usually incompatible in research.
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New post 22 May 2010, 20:53
A,C,D are irrelevant. Also the negation approach gives us B and E ...
Upon reading again, I feel that focus is not motivation of graduate students. Hence, E is a better choice.

So, E.
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New post 23 May 2010, 04:42
Only B & E are the contenders, others ate irrelevant
now use LEN method - negate the assumption

Negate B - SOME Graduate students are motivated by humane interests. Does it affect conclusion. NO, Pharma companies still will work their way, irrespective of graduate students interests.

Negate E -The interests of pharmaceutical companies and human welfare are sometimes compatible in research. Does this affects conclusion. YES, if their interests are compatible. then why would pharma companies do what the conclusion say. this raises doubts about conclusion. Hence, the best possible option

hope this helps
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New post 31 May 2010, 15:45
E is best because phramaceutical companies focus on research projects which will yield lucrative results and are not bothered about human welfare.
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Through their selective funding of research projects, pharmaceutical companies exert too much influence upon medical research in universities. Only research proposals promising lucrative results are given serious consideration, and funding is usually awarded to scientists at large institutions who already have vast research experience. As a result, only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, and graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation. Research will continue to be conducted at the expense of human welfare.

Which of the following reactions of a pharmaceutical company representative would provide the strongest rebuttal to the comments above?

(A) Many of the research projects funded by pharmaceutical companies do not end up being lucrative.

(B) Much of the funding provided by pharmaceutical companies goes to fellowships that help pay for the education of graduate students.

(C) If it were not for the funds which pharmaceutical companies provide, very little medical research could be conducted at all.

(D) The committee members fail to discuss other methods of funding research projects.

(E) Larger universities are the only ones equipped to conduct the kind of research sponsored by pharmaceutical companies.


OA - C

Can you please explain why E) is incorrect? If ONLY large universities are equipped to do the research, pharma companies are not wrong in funding ONLY large univ. Correct?

The conclusion is : Research will continue to be conducted at the cost of human welfare. The author provides a bunch of evidences : only large universities will be able to conduct the research; students' research will conform to the expectations of the companies.

However, if only large univ are the ones that CAN conduct the research, isn't the argument against companies weakened? Another point could be made that the author assumes that the expectations of the companies don't comply with human welfare. However, both the statements will equally kill the argument.

Thoughts?
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New post 22 Jul 2012, 20:44
@voodoochild - please follow the forum rules and DON'T type the OA openly. Keep it hidden.

Please find the below link for the CR answer.
http://www.beatthegmat.com/toughest-cr- ... 15737.html

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New post 22 Jul 2012, 21:49
(E) is more of another premise, only (C) is refuting the statement
(C)If it were not for the funds which pharmaceutical companies provide, very little medical research could be conducted at all.
Which means that the research is not happening on the cost of human welfare but the the funding given by the pharma companies
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voodoochild wrote:
Through their selective funding of research projects, pharmaceutical companies exert too much influence upon medical research in universities. Only research proposals promising lucrative results are given serious consideration, and funding is usually awarded to scientists at large institutions who already have vast research experience. As a result, only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, and graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation. Research will continue to be conducted at the expense of human welfare.

Which of the following reactions of a pharmaceutical company representative would provide the strongest rebuttal to the comments above?
(A) Many of the research projects funded by pharmaceutical companies do not end up being lucrative.
(B) Much of the funding provided by pharmaceutical companies goes to fellowships that help pay for the education of graduate students.
(C) If it were not for the funds which pharmaceutical companies provide, very little medical research could be conducted at all.
(D) The committee members fail to discuss other methods of funding research projects.
(E) Larger universities are the only ones equipped to conduct the kind of research sponsored by pharmaceutical companies.

Can you please explain why E) is incorrect? If ONLY large universities are equipped to do the research, pharma companies are not wrong in funding ONLY large univ. Correct?

The conclusion is : Research will continue to be conducted at the cost of human welfare. The author provides a bunch of evidences: only large universities will be able to conduct the research; students' research will conform to the expectations of the companies. However, if only large univ are the ones that CAN conduct the research, isn't the argument against companies weakened? Another point could be made that the author assumes that the expectations of the companies don't comply with human welfare. However, both the statements will equally kill the argument. Thoughts?


I am responding to a pm from VoodooChild.

The critic making this argument is saying, essentially -- pharmaceutical companies only care about profits, not human welfare, so when they dump all this research money into the universities, they are essentially hijacking and manipulating the intellectual resources of that university for their own money-making schemes, again at the expense of human welfare. At an even more simplistic level, we could reduce the argument to: When universities receive research money from pharmaceutical companies, that's bad for human welfare. Fundamentally, that's what the critic is saying, between the lines.

Now, suppose the pharmaceutical company representative responds with (E): "Larger universities are the only ones equipped to conduct the kind of research sponsored by pharmaceutical companies." Then, the critic is going to say --- Yes, larger universities are the only ones big enough to handle your giant money-making schemes! Only larger universities have the resources that will ultimately allow you to line your pockets with vast quantities of graft. Without your influence, those larger universities could be working on research that directly benefits human welfare, but instead, you have forced them to work on stuff that will just benefit your bottom line!

Answer (E) addresses the choice of larger universities, rather than all universities --- that was a point made in passing in the argument, but it is not essential to the argument. Theoretically, the pharmaceutical companies could fund research at every single university, public and private, in the whole country --- then everyone would be manipulated by their money, and (according to the critic) human welfare would be hurt even more. That would be even worse! The argument about where the research is happening is not essential to the main argument. The essential thing is --- what really benefits human welfare? (E) doesn't touch that, and as I tried to make clear, a persistent critic would not be satisfied if they gave (E) as an answer.

Not all evidence is equal. Here, the argument contains what ostensibly is a line of evidence: "...only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities ...", but even if this is completely cut out, denied, and the opposite is true --- every single university, big and small, gets pharmaceutical money ---- that would actually strengthen the argument, as far as the critic is concerned. If every single university, big and small, is under the profit-seeking influence of the pharmaceutical companies, then no one will do anything to benefit human welfare. It's not enough to attack what appears as evidence --- you have to think, contextually, about what it would mean for that piece of evidence to be false.

Meanwhile, if the the pharmaceutical company representative responds with (C):"If it were not for the funds which pharmaceutical companies provide, very little medical research could be conducted at all." If pharmaceutical companies don't invest, no research happens, no new cures or treatments for disease are developed, and human welfare is thereby hurt. The critic's argument, in its core form, is "Pharmaceutical money = bad", and this is the only answer choice that says anything like, ""Pharmaceutical money = good", which is what a rebuttal would have to say.

I totally agree with you --- this is, at best, a tepid rebuttal. The critic says to the pharmaceutical companies, "Your money makes the situation bad," and (C) is essentially saying, "Yes, but it would be even worse without our money." Yes, it's a kind of rebuttal, but hardly a ringing endorsement for the ethical standing of the pharmaceutical companies. A much more powerful rebuttal would be along the lines of what you suggested --- as you said, "author assumes that the expectations of the companies don't comply with human welfare", so something that attacks that assumption would be an excellent rebuttal. For example, the pharmaceutical company representative could have said, "The research from which we derive the greatest profits are profitable precisely because so many people benefit from the resultant breakthroughs." In other words, profits and human welfare are aligned, not at odds. That would be a powerful rebuttal (except that, in all likelihood, it's just corporate B.S that manipulates the facts and misrepresents the situation, but that's getting into second-order objections, much more complex than the GMAT CR involves).

Does all this make sense?

Mike :)
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New post 23 Jul 2012, 22:03
Kudos to Mike! Very clear explanation.
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New post 24 Jul 2012, 09:51
mikemcgarry wrote:
voodoochild wrote:
Through their selective funding of research projects, pharmaceutical companies exert too much influence upon medical research in universities. Only research proposals promising lucrative results are given serious consideration, and funding is usually awarded to scientists at large institutions who already have vast research experience. As a result, only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, and graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation. Research will continue to be conducted at the expense of human welfare.

Which of the following reactions of a pharmaceutical company representative would provide the strongest rebuttal to the comments above?
(A) Many of the research projects funded by pharmaceutical companies do not end up being lucrative.
(B) Much of the funding provided by pharmaceutical companies goes to fellowships that help pay for the education of graduate students.
(C) If it were not for the funds which pharmaceutical companies provide, very little medical research could be conducted at all.
(D) The committee members fail to discuss other methods of funding research projects.
(E) Larger universities are the only ones equipped to conduct the kind of research sponsored by pharmaceutical companies.

Can you please explain why E) is incorrect? If ONLY large universities are equipped to do the research, pharma companies are not wrong in funding ONLY large univ. Correct?

The conclusion is : Research will continue to be conducted at the cost of human welfare. The author provides a bunch of evidences: only large universities will be able to conduct the research; students' research will conform to the expectations of the companies. However, if only large univ are the ones that CAN conduct the research, isn't the argument against companies weakened? Another point could be made that the author assumes that the expectations of the companies don't comply with human welfare. However, both the statements will equally kill the argument. Thoughts?


I am responding to a pm from VoodooChild.

The critic making this argument is saying, essentially -- pharmaceutical companies only care about profits, not human welfare, so when they dump all this research money into the universities, they are essentially hijacking and manipulating the intellectual resources of that university for their own money-making schemes, again at the expense of human welfare. At an even more simplistic level, we could reduce the argument to: When universities receive research money from pharmaceutical companies, that's bad for human welfare. Fundamentally, that's what the critic is saying, between the lines.

Now, suppose the pharmaceutical company representative responds with (E): "Larger universities are the only ones equipped to conduct the kind of research sponsored by pharmaceutical companies." Then, the critic is going to say --- Yes, larger universities are the only ones big enough to handle your giant money-making schemes! Only larger universities have the resources that will ultimately allow you to line your pockets with vast quantities of graft. Without your influence, those larger universities could be working on research that directly benefits human welfare, but instead, you have forced them to work on stuff that will just benefit your bottom line!

Answer (E) addresses the choice of larger universities, rather than all universities --- that was a point made in passing in the argument, but it is not essential to the argument. Theoretically, the pharmaceutical companies could fund research at every single university, public and private, in the whole country --- then everyone would be manipulated by their money, and (according to the critic) human welfare would be hurt even more. That would be even worse! The argument about where the research is happening is not essential to the main argument. The essential thing is --- what really benefits human welfare? (E) doesn't touch that, and as I tried to make clear, a persistent critic would not be satisfied if they gave (E) as an answer.

Not all evidence is equal. Here, the argument contains what ostensibly is a line of evidence: "...only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities ...", but even if this is completely cut out, denied, and the opposite is true --- every single university, big and small, gets pharmaceutical money ---- that would actually strengthen the argument, as far as the critic is concerned. If every single university, big and small, is under the profit-seeking influence of the pharmaceutical companies, then no one will do anything to benefit human welfare. It's not enough to attack what appears as evidence --- you have to think, contextually, about what it would mean for that piece of evidence to be false.

Meanwhile, if the the pharmaceutical company representative responds with (C):"If it were not for the funds which pharmaceutical companies provide, very little medical research could be conducted at all." If pharmaceutical companies don't invest, no research happens, no new cures or treatments for disease are developed, and human welfare is thereby hurt. The critic's argument, in its core form, is "Pharmaceutical money = bad", and this is the only answer choice that says anything like, ""Pharmaceutical money = good", which is what a rebuttal would have to say.

I totally agree with you --- this is, at best, a tepid rebuttal. The critic says to the pharmaceutical companies, "Your money makes the situation bad," and (C) is essentially saying, "Yes, but it would be even worse without our money." Yes, it's a kind of rebuttal, but hardly a ringing endorsement for the ethical standing of the pharmaceutical companies. A much more powerful rebuttal would be along the lines of what you suggested --- as you said, "author assumes that the expectations of the companies don't comply with human welfare", so something that attacks that assumption would be an excellent rebuttal. For example, the pharmaceutical company representative could have said, "The research from which we derive the greatest profits are profitable precisely because so many people benefit from the resultant breakthroughs." In other words, profits and human welfare are aligned, not at odds. That would be a powerful rebuttal (except that, in all likelihood, it's just corporate B.S that manipulates the facts and misrepresents the situation, but that's getting into second-order objections, much more complex than the GMAT CR involves).

Does all this make sense?

Mike :)


Mike,

Thanks for your detailed response. However, I am not following the fact that we are ignoring the written evidence by the critic. In other words, "only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, and graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation. " The critic is not only suggesting that the companies influence the kind of research but also suggesting that (he has used "AND" connector) the research is carried only at Large universities by companies. However, the pharma guy could say that it's not that we are influencing the decision to ONLY choose large universities but that only LARGE universities are equipped to do the kind of research that interests us. The argument is killed. Isn't it?

For instance, Vietnamese guy could say that Bayer is not investing in stem cell research in Vietnam but investing in Princeton university (it's a random example). The Bayer guy will say that only Princeton is equipped to do the research. What do I do?

The main conclusion is hinged on the an intermediate conclusion as an evidence.

HEre's the flow, as per me:

{#1: Intermediate conclusion (IC) : only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities,

+

#2 : Intermediate conclusion (IC): graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation.
}
Main conclusion : Research will continue to be conducted at the expense of human welfare

Support for IC #1 = funding is usually awarded to scientists at large institutions who already have vast research experience.
Support for IC #2 = Only research proposals promising lucrative results are given serious consideration,

As we can see that there two parallel threads going on in the argument. Both the threads are equally important. Both can equally destroy the argument.

thoughts?

Thanks
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voodoochild wrote:
Mike, Thanks for your detailed response. However, I am not following the fact that we are ignoring the written evidence by the critic. In other words, "only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, and graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation. " The critic is not only suggesting that the companies influence the kind of research but also suggesting that (he has used "AND" connector) the research is carried only at Large universities by companies. However, the pharma guy could say that it's not that we are influencing the decision to ONLY choose large universities but that only LARGE universities are equipped to do the kind of research that interests us. The argument is killed. Isn't it?

The big idea, once again --- not all evidence is created equal. Just because it's stated as evidence in the course of the argument absolutely does not make it automatically crucial for the argument. Everything on the GMAT CR is about reasoning in context. Why on earth would the pharmaceutical company's pouring money into large universities hurt human welfare more than if they invested the same amount across a number of small universities? If they dump, say, $5 billion into the university system to promote research that will enhance their own profits, does it really matter exactly where that $5 billion lands? Regardless of how it's distributed, that's $5 billion of resources & time & energy & brain-power devoted, ultimately, to making those companies more money -- and the critic would say, that hurts human welfare. The whole "large university" part of the argument is a distractor that is not really relevant to the thrust of the argument --- again, the exact opposite could be true, and that would not damage the argument --- it might even make the argument stronger! For example, the more spread out the money is, the more people are working to support the pharmaceutical companies aims, and their self-serving influence is that much more pervasive --- according to the critic, that would be just as bad for human welfare, if not worse!
voodoochild wrote:
For instance, Vietnamese guy could say that Bayer is not investing in stem cell research in Vietnam but investing in Princeton university (it's a random example). The Bayer guy will say that only Princeton is equipped to do the research. What do I do?

There's nothing to do. Princeton, a century-old bastion of privilege, has considerably greater resources than an country that is still struggling to recover from one of the most devastating internal wars in the modern era. The Vietnamese guy is right. The representative from Bayer is right. The rich get richer --- for better or worse, that's a familiar pattern in global capitalism.
voodoochild wrote:
The main conclusion is hinged on the an intermediate conclusion as an evidence.
HEre's the flow, as per me:
{#1: Intermediate conclusion (IC) : only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, +
#2 : Intermediate conclusion (IC): graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation.}
Main conclusion : Research will continue to be conducted at the expense of human welfare
Support for IC #1 = funding is usually awarded to scientists at large institutions who already have vast research experience.
Support for IC #2 = Only research proposals promising lucrative results are given serious consideration,
As we can see that there two parallel threads going on in the argument. Both the threads are equally important. Both can equally destroy the argument.
thoughts?
Thanks

You are thinking dogmatically and formulaically about CR, and the GMAT viciously punishes that kind of approach. Once again, the GMAT CR is all about deeply contextual reasoning, reasoning that sifts through what is unique and particular about each new situation. That's what you'll need to sort out arguments in the business world, so that's what the GMAT CR addresses.
In my reading, the reference to larger universities just emphasizes, indirectly, the enormous amount of money in play in this situation. It is a somewhat unessential detail that is just the critic's way of saying, "We ain't talkin' peanuts here." Once again, it is absolutely nothing like an intermediate conclusion, because as I have said before, the exact opposite could be true and it still wouldn't weaken the argument --- if, instead of giving $1 billion to each of five large universities, the pharmaceutical companies give, say, $100 million to each of 50 smaller universities --- either way, that's $5 billion of resources in play, devoted to making profits for those companies, which, the critic feels, comes at the expense of human welfare. Where the money is spent is really beside the point entirely. It doesn't affect the conclusion at all.
If you cling to formulaic ideas like "The main conclusion is hinged on the intermediate conclusion as an evidence" that will inevitably mess you up when you come to particular questions that don't follow the pattern. If you try to force-fit CR arguments into preconceived molds, you will get one after another wrong. The GMAT excels at creating CR argument-situations that are irreducibly unique, in which the logical interrelationships avoid falling into any neat predictable pattern. No formulaic approach can substitute for flexible critical thinking about the ineluctably unique features of the situation.
Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Through their selective funding of research projects [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jul 2012, 10:08
mikemcgarry wrote:
voodoochild wrote:
Mike, Thanks for your detailed response. However, I am not following the fact that we are ignoring the written evidence by the critic. In other words, "only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, and graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation. " The critic is not only suggesting that the companies influence the kind of research but also suggesting that (he has used "AND" connector) the research is carried only at Large universities by companies. However, the pharma guy could say that it's not that we are influencing the decision to ONLY choose large universities but that only LARGE universities are equipped to do the kind of research that interests us. The argument is killed. Isn't it?

The big idea, once again --- not all evidence is created equal. Just because it's stated as evidence in the course of the argument absolutely does not make it automatically crucial for the argument. Everything on the GMAT CR is about reasoning in context. Why on earth would the pharmaceutical company's pouring money into large universities hurt human welfare more than if they invested the same amount across a number of small universities? If they dump, say, $5 billion into the university system to promote research that will enhance their own profits, does it really matter exactly where that $5 billion lands? Regardless of how it's distributed, that's $5 billion of resources & time & energy & brain-power devoted, ultimately, to making those companies more money -- and the critic would say, that hurts human welfare. The whole "large university" part of the argument is a distractor that is not really relevant to the thrust of the argument --- again, the exact opposite could be true, and that would not damage the argument --- it might even make the argument stronger! For example, the more spread out the money is, the more people are working to support the pharmaceutical companies aims, and their self-serving influence is that much more pervasive --- according to the critic, that would be just as bad for human welfare, if not worse!
voodoochild wrote:
For instance, Vietnamese guy could say that Bayer is not investing in stem cell research in Vietnam but investing in Princeton university (it's a random example). The Bayer guy will say that only Princeton is equipped to do the research. What do I do?

There's nothing to do. Princeton, a century-old bastion of privilege, has considerably greater resources than an country that is still struggling to recover from one of the most devastating internal wars in the modern era. The Vietnamese guy is right. The representative from Bayer is right. The rich get richer --- for better or worse, that's a familiar pattern in global capitalism.
voodoochild wrote:
The main conclusion is hinged on the an intermediate conclusion as an evidence.
HEre's the flow, as per me:
{#1: Intermediate conclusion (IC) : only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities, +
#2 : Intermediate conclusion (IC): graduate students will learn that their future research must conform to the expectations of the corporation.}
Main conclusion : Research will continue to be conducted at the expense of human welfare
Support for IC #1 = funding is usually awarded to scientists at large institutions who already have vast research experience.
Support for IC #2 = Only research proposals promising lucrative results are given serious consideration,
As we can see that there two parallel threads going on in the argument. Both the threads are equally important. Both can equally destroy the argument.
thoughts?
Thanks

You are thinking dogmatically and formulaically about CR, and the GMAT viciously punishes that kind of approach. Once again, the GMAT CR is all about deeply contextual reasoning, reasoning that sifts through what is unique and particular about each new situation. That's what you'll need to sort out arguments in the business world, so that's what the GMAT CR addresses.
In my reading, the reference to larger universities just emphasizes, indirectly, the enormous amount of money in play in this situation. It is a somewhat unessential detail that is just the critic's way of saying, "We ain't talkin' peanuts here." Once again, it is absolutely nothing like an intermediate conclusion, because as I have said before, the exact opposite could be true and it still wouldn't weaken the argument --- if, instead of giving $1 billion to each of five large universities, the pharmaceutical companies give, say, $100 million to each of 50 smaller universities --- either way, that's $5 billion of resources in play, devoted to making profits for those companies, which, the critic feels, comes at the expense of human welfare. Where the money is spent is really beside the point entirely. It doesn't affect the conclusion at all.
If you cling to formulaic ideas like "The main conclusion is hinged on the intermediate conclusion as an evidence" that will inevitably mess you up when you come to particular questions that don't follow the pattern. If you try to force-fit CR arguments into preconceived molds, you will get one after another wrong. The GMAT excels at creating CR argument-situations that are irreducibly unique, in which the logical interrelationships avoid falling into any neat predictable pattern. No formulaic approach can substitute for flexible critical thinking about the ineluctably unique features of the situation.
Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)



Mike,
Thanks for correcting me.

I have started reading like a debater after failing miserably on the CR. I am seeing some improvement by adopting strategies recommended by Powerscore LSAT book (The GMAT book is a mini version of the LSAT book - most of the chapters are the same). The books prescribes that the reader must read like a Phd Research Analyst or a lawyer. Every single word, thought, statement, inference counts. The book helps us to see the argument as composed of several layers of statements built on top of each other.

Do you know any specific real GMAT CR from OG12 that requires a real world logical thinking, and one would fail to solve the problem using logical reasoning skills? The book just recommends to keep an eye on evidences , hidden intermediate conclusions and hidden assumptions between statements. I used to depend on real-world reasoning, but I realized that I tend to miss crisp details in the argument.

I re-read the passage again. E) , in this case, is a strengthener. Here's why:

Evidence : Funding is usuallyawarded to scientists at large institutions who already have vast research experience.
Intermediate conclusion - only larger universities will be able to continue developing adequate research facilities,

HEnce, E) actually supports critic's argument because the IC uses a specific word "only" to say that the company influences "only" large institution. "most" or "usually" funded institutions do not hold good for a good reason.

Please let me know a GMAT CR on which the above logical reasoning skills will fail. I am eager for your expert response and guidance.

Thoughts?
Re: Through their selective funding of research projects   [#permalink] 26 Jul 2012, 10:08

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