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Top 3 Tips For Fitting GMAT Studying Into a Busy Schedule  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Feb 2020, 13:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: Top 3 Tips For Fitting GMAT Studying Into a Busy Schedule
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The GMAT is a marathon, not a sprint. It’s not a given that you’ll be able to stay motivated to study without burning out, and many people find themselves studying for the GMAT for months longer than they meant to because they just needed a break. So let’s talk about how you can study without putting your life on pause.

GMAT Study Tip 1: Plan Your Week of Prep
Organization will be your best friend. You have dozens of things that need to be done in any given week. And because studying for the GMAT is a long process, it’s very easy to tell yourself that you can start tomorrow, next week, next month, or next year. Pick a date to start and times to study and commit.

Many students try to balance work and GMAT by focusing Monday through Friday on work and home obligations, then setting aside huge chunks of time on the weekend to get through their GMAT studying. If that’s the only possible way you can get your studying in, then do that, but it’s not the ideal. A more effective plan is to study a little every day, even if it ends up being less overall time spent studying.

Learning science tells us that we learn best by testing ourselves. You can be told that the square root of 289 is 17. You can read it. You can repeat it aloud. But the thing that makes it stick in your mind the best is being asked: What is the square root of 289? You test yourself, and in that testing, solidify your knowledge. You now know it’s 17. This is why flashcards are often an effective learning tool.

Going a little deeper, you want to wait until you almost forget a concept, then test yourself on it to bring it to the forefront of your mind. What’s the square root of 289? It’s 17. You remembered after a few seconds and through a few sentences. Good start. Now you’ll need to wait a little longer and test yourself again until you really know it. Ask it in different ways. Once you can answer the question correctly regardless of how much time has passed since you last thought of it, you have effectively learned it. What’s the square root of 289? It’s 17.

Apply that to studying for the GMAT. If you plan to study for 6 hours every Saturday and Sunday, but no other days of the week, you are waiting 5 days after reading and using a new concept before you test yourself on it. Can you recall it after 5 days? Maybe. But odds are you’re going to have forgotten a lot in that time span. Instead, learn a little on Monday, then test yourself on it on Tuesday. If you can recall the concept, great. Study something new. But on Thursday, check to see if you can still recall it. Check again on Sunday. Spaced repetition is one of the most efficient ways to truly master something.

By the way, try to test yourself in different ways. What’s 17 squared? You’re going to have to know both rules and strategies backwards and forwards to get a top GMAT score. (It’s 289, if you’d forgotten.)

It may feel like there aren’t enough hours in the day for this, but you can make it happen with planning. Each week, think about everything you want to get done. It’s even better if you write it down. From that list, isolate the items that absolutely must be done this week, making sure to include daily GMAT studying. Put your absolute must-do’s on the calendar at specific times. Give yourself start and end times for GMAT studying each day (though we do encourage you to take one day a week off from GMAT).

This calendar system has two major benefits. First, it makes it way more likely that you will actually study for the GMAT each week. Second, by scheduling out your other major commitments, you don’t have to waste valuable energy worrying what you’re sacrificing by studying for the GMAT. This chosen time is GMAT study time, and you will deal with the other things at their times.

GMAT Study Tip 2: Wake Up Earlier
It may not be profound, but it’s effective. Most people wait until the end of the day to open their GMAT books. At that point, they’ve often put in a full day of work, made dinner, washed dishes, maybe put the kids to bed, and then they try to study. Of course this doesn’t work well. So change the system.

Your mind is most active during the morning. No, wait! Don’t stop reading yet! I get it. I should not be spoken to until after my first cup of coffee. But the truth is that once you get up, get something to eat, and grab your caffeine if you (desperately) need it, you’ve found the time of the day that the brain is most able to make new memories and focus most clearly.

Why? Much of it is situational. You expect to have a certain amount of time each evening, and you already have a system for what to fill it with. Waking up a half hour earlier creates unexpected bonus time. You don’t have anything that already fills that time, except sleep. If you have to go to bed half an hour earlier to wake up half an hour earlier, your studying will feel much more natural and be more impactful.

It’s also better to study when you don’t have too much to think about. At the end of the day, you’ve gotten a lot done, but there’s always more you need to do. Knowing that you have time for only one more thing before you’re done for the day makes studying feel like a sacrifice. If you study, you can’t wash the dishes, you can’t watch TV, you can’t go out with friends. However, if you study first thing in the morning, then you stop worrying about it. The studying is done, and you have the rest of the day to focus on everything else going on in your life. Give yourself permission to study consistently by doing it in the morning.

GMAT Study Tip 3: Utilize Shorter Study Sessions
Throughout the day there are always a few minutes here and there when you have nothing to do. If you’re like me, those minutes are probably spent on social media, checking your phone, or rechecking your email for no good reason. What if you actually used those minutes to support your GMAT studies?

Each week, plan out a few things you could do to study that don’t require much material or notice. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Print out a few Sentence Correction sentences, without the answer choices, and try to isolate the sentence core, find any major issues, and predict what fixes will likely be present in the answer choices. If you’re able to jot down some notes, you can check your expectations against the answer choices later, but even if you can’t, the mental exercise will be a huge benefit.
  • Write the answer choices to several quant questions. Include only the question, but not the information to answer it [e.g. What fraction of the total is x? A) 9/7 B) 7/5 C) 5/7 D) 2/7 E) 1/7 ]. Brainstorm what traps and hints are present in the answer choices. If you had to guess, what would you select or what would you avoid?
  • Copy the arguments of several Critical Reasoning questions. Try to deconstruct each into premise and conclusion. Write a few answers that would strengthen, weaken, or be an assumption.
  • Block out a few numbers of a quant question, so you won’t be tempted to solve it, but copy all the text of the problem. Determine what strategy would be best for the question. What would you do if you did have enough information to solve?
  • Keep an RC passage that you’ll read one paragraph at a time, each time stopping to reflect on the main point of that paragraph.
  • Of course, you can also have a few full questions ready to go that you try to complete.
If you use flashcards, have a few with you at all times. None of these ideas are particularly hard to set up, but they require some planning so that you don’t waste your few free minutes deciding what to do rather than just doing it. You’d be surprised how much continuous study throughout the day will help you to more effectively and confidently tackle new questions.

By the way, what’s 17 times 17? Look it up if you don’t remember, then keep testing yourself!

NEXT: How and When to Register for the GMAT

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Emily Madan is a Manhattan Prep instructor located in Philadelphia, Pa. She has a master’s degree in chemistry and tries to approach the GMAT and LSAT from a scientific perspective. These tests are puzzles with patterns that students can be taught to find. She has been teaching test prep for over ten years, scoring a 770 on the GMAT and 177 on the LSAT. Check out Emily’s upcoming LSAT courses here.

The post Top 3 Tips For Fitting GMAT Studying Into a Busy Schedule appeared first on GMAT.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Joined: 14 Nov 2013
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Updates from Manhattan GMAT  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Feb 2020, 22:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: GMAT Quant Tips: Mental Math – Part 2
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Inmy last blog post, I had a chat with my dad, a math teacher, about the importance of mental math. Today, I want to get more specific: I want to give you some things to memorize before you take the GMAT or GRE, along with a few tips about how to practice memorizing them.

What to Memorize for GMAT Quant 
GMAT Mental Math Tip 1:
What: Times tables up to 12 (and practice your multiplication and division in general)

Why: You’ll be doing these calculations so often during the test that errors will destroy your score and cost you time. When my students complain that they make too many “silly mistakes,” one of the first things that I ask them is, “What’s 12 times 7?” If you can’t answer that quickly, then not only have you identified the problem, you’ve also learned that the solution to your problem is a relatively low-effort one.

How: (1) Make flashcards! And don’t use a flashcard app; there’s some evidence that writing the flashcard yourself will help you memorize it. (2) There are endless opportunities in everyday life to practice your times tables: my suggestion is to just stop using your calculator when your brain will do. Need to buy eight pizzas at $9 each for your little sister’s soccer team? Figure out the total in your head. Need to split that total among 6 team parents? Put that calculator app away, cheater – you can do that on your own now! Got an option to pay your car insurance in a lump sum vs. 12 monthly payments? Figure out how much more the monthly option is going to cost you. Bored at the gas tank? Check your odometer at two fill-ups in a row, and figure out what kind of mileage your car actually gets (vs. what the slick car ad copy promised). There are endless opportunities out there as long as you stay curious.

GMAT Mental Math Tip 2:
What: Fraction-percent conversions for 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/8, 1/9, 1/10, 1/20, and 1/100.

Why: Because these conversions lead to many other conversions (for example, 1/9 is 11.1%, so 7/9 is 77.7%). Also, a problem that is difficult in decimal/percent form can become infinitely easier in fraction form, and vice versa. Want proof? What’s 37.5 percent of 560? Easy: it’s 3/8 of 560. So divide by 8 to get 70, then multiply by 3 to get 210.

How: Remember that pizza for your little sis? What’s the delivery charge going to be if you want to give the delivery person a 15% tip? (Just take 1/10 of the total, then half of that, and add those two numbers together). Want to buy that flat screen TV at Costco, but worried about the 9% sales tax? Just divide the price by 11 and tack it on. Here’s one of my personal favorites: every time you see some item on sale for some percentage off, figure out what it actually costs, and then immediately find something else that you wanted recently that you could buy at full price for roughly that same amount of money. Then you’ll know whether you’re really getting a deal. Oh, also: tip charts are the new answer keys. Figure out the tip yourself first, then check to make sure you’re right!

GMAT Mental Math Tip 3:
What: Prime numbers up to 100

Why: Because most big numbers are just a bunch of smaller prime numbers multiplied together. I saw a GMAT problem where a crucial final step was to add 1/15 + 1/18. Far too many of my students thought that they needed to convert the denominator to 270. But the ones who found prime factors of 15 (3 × 5) and 18 (2 × 3 × 3) noticed that both 15 and 18 contain a 3, so 90 is actually the common denominator; those students, on average, solved the problem about a full minute faster. Also, some GMAT problems ask you quite directly whether a number is prime. Why not just memorize some primes in advance?

How: For all positive integers from 2 to 100, a number is prime if it’s not divisible by 2, 3, 5, or 7. So just start learning primes in the shower; see if you can get to 100 without missing any. Conveniently, this will also teach you shortcuts for how to check whether a number is divisible by 2, 3, or 5 (there’s no great shortcut for 7, so see “times tables,” above!).

GMAT Mental Math Tip 4:
What: Powers of 2 (2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512)

Why: Because you’ll need to be able to recognize them on sight, not to mention that it’s important if you want to keep the respect of your IT team. The GMAT and GRE will ask you to simplify expressions like 32^5 · 64^3. This is impossible without knowing that 32 is 2^5, and 64 is 2^6.

How: Do a web search for “2048” – it’s a surprisingly addictive web-based game; if your boss catches you playing at work, don’t say I didn’t warn you.

Honorable Mention GMAT Mental Math Tips:
Learn the two most common Pythagorean Triples (3-4-5 and 5-12-13), the ratio of sides in a 45-45-90 triangle and a 30-60-90 triangle, the decimal approximations (to a tenth) of √2, √3, and π, powers of 3 (notice I said “powers,” not “multiples”), factorials from 2! to 6!, and how to factor the difference of squares. If you show up to the first day of my GMAT class with everything in this post down cold, I promise it will not only enrich your experience in class, it will also help you achieve the best score possible!

RELATED: Common Math Errors on the GMAT

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. Check out our upcoming courses here.

ImageRyan Jacobs is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in San Francisco, California. He has an MBA from UC San Diego, a 780 on the GMAT, and years of GMAT teaching experience. His other interests include music, photography, and hockey. Check out Ryan’s upcoming GMAT prep offerings here.





The post GMAT Quant Tips: Mental Math – Part 2 appeared first on GMAT.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
http://manhattangmat.com
Manhattan GMAT Online Marketing Associate
User avatar
Joined: 14 Nov 2013
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“I’m Bad at Grammar” And Other Lies You Tell Yourself  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Feb 2020, 14:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: “I’m Bad at Grammar” And Other Lies You Tell Yourself
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/02/mprep-blogimages-wave1-51-e1581541660221.png[/img]

I’ll be honest, when I started studying for the GMAT, I couldn’t tell the difference between an adjective and a verb. If you asked what my biggest weakness was, I would absolutely have said “Grammar. I’m awful at it.” But I was wrong, and if you think you’re bad at grammar, there’s a good chance you are wrong too.

[b]The GMAT Grammar You Know[/b]
The grammar you know is largely instinctual at this point. When you hear the sentence:

The history of the Mayan people are rich and varied, but it’s interesting.

you should notice that something is wrong. You may have to say it aloud, but something will hit your ear wrong, even if you don’t know what it is.

This instinct comes from decades of knowing and using correct grammar. You know Subject-Verb Agreement; The history…IS rich because history and is are both singular. The inclusion of the word but distorts the sentence meaning. It implies there’s some kind of contrast, but the sentence is only discussing positive traits; why would there be a contrast? A more correct sentence would be:

The history of the Mayan people is rich and varied, as well as interesting.

Most of the grammar tested on the GMAT is grammar you are already completely comfortable with. The difference is that in your day-to-day life, you can get away with not thinking about it. In a testing situation, with the pressure on, you’re trying to put a name to concepts you haven’t directly considered in years. You’re likely to second guess yourself, though there are still probably many Sentence Correction questions you will get right just by ear.

As you study, note which concepts you tend to get right by ear. That way, when you know that rule is being tested, you can feel more confident in trusting your instincts.

[b]The GMAT Grammar You Don’t Know[/b]
That said, there is grammar that shows up on the GMAT that, if you’ve ever learned it, you’ve probably forgotten. To master these rules, you’ll have to learn and practice them. This is incredibly common, and yet I see students get extremely discouraged by this process. It’s as if not naturally knowing the nuances of parallelism means your English is poor.

Luckily, this is simply not true. There are a finite number of rules that you’ll need to master, almost all of which are predictable. Modifiers, parallelism, and perhaps a few verb tenses are some fairly common ones, but everyone’s list will be a little different. It’s helpful to understand that there are several grammatical rules that the GMAT considers absolute, but would be completely unnecessary in spoken English.

I often get students whose native language is not English concerned that they will have significant difficulties with Sentence Correction. However, as long as those students speak English fluently, I find they are often some of the stronger SC students. Unlike native speakers, people who learn English as adults have had to consider grammatical rules recently, making it somewhat easier to recall and implement them on test day.

[b]Applying it to GMAT Sentence Correction[/b]
Why is sentence correction so hard if you are actually good at grammar? Because the sentences test things in very specific ways. If someone were to point to a clause and ask you to position it so that the sentence has the right emphasis, you likely wouldn’t have too much of a problem. Try it here. Insert the clause considering whether you are taking sufficient care of yourself into the below sentence.

It is important to moisturize your hands daily, not only because of the hydrating effect moisturizers have, but also because it encourages you to take note of your hygiene routine.

It’s a strange clause in a detailed sentence that you have no prior familiarity with. However, the most logical place for that clause is at the end, making the sentence:

It is important to moisturize your hands daily, not only because of the hydrating effect moisturizers have, but also because it encourages you to take note of your hygiene routine considering whether you are taking sufficient care of yourself .

A sentence correction problem, however, won’t directly point out what you should focus on. Without knowing which rules to consider, there are simply too many grammatical restrictions to consider all of them in only a minute. The fix? Create an SC process that enables you to decode each question. It’s possible to read the original sentence with the foreknowledge of what is most likely being tested and where you should concentrate your energy.

To sum up, you have most of the content knowledge you need. There are a few new rules to learn, but they’re minimal. Your focus should be on learning how to bring your innate knowledge to the front of your mind and making logical decisions based in a high stress testing scenario.

[b]UP NEXT: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/im-bad-at-math-and-other-lies-you-tell-yourself/]“I’m Bad at Math” And Other Lies You Tell Yourself[/url]

[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/01/emily-madan-taking-the-gmat-225x300.jpg[/img]

[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/#instructor/344][b]Emily Madan[/b][/url][b] is a Manhattan Prep instructor located in Philadelphia, Pa. [/b]She has a master’s degree in chemistry and tries to approach the GMAT and LSAT from a scientific perspective. These tests are puzzles with patterns that students can be taught to find. She has been teaching test prep for over ten years, scoring a 770 on the GMAT and 177 on the LSAT. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/lsat/classes/#instructor/57]Check out Emily’s upcoming LSAT courses here[/url].

The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/im-bad-at-grammar-and-other-lies-you-tell-yourself/]“I’m Bad at Grammar” And Other Lies You Tell Yourself[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Updates from Manhattan GMAT  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Feb 2020, 14:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: How to Enjoy Taking the GMAT
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I know this is a totally unnecessary article, since I’m sure you enjoy taking the GMAT very much already. But do keep reading: at the very least, you’ll have a new way of explaining to your friends why you’re spending all your weeknights curled up with a gently used copy of the test’s Official Guide.

The GMAT is Exciting!
First, a question: what percent of your daily life would you describe as “mundane?” I don’t mean to cause any existential crises here, but I’ll admit: I spend a lot of my day making toast and coffee, doing laundry, answering e-mails from the office, commuting, filling out timesheets, scheduling appointments, and lately, filing taxes. These are all things that I know are necessary but, given the choice, would rather not do, and for good reason: for the most part, they don’t meaningfully engage my brain. Most of them are activities I’ve already done a million times, and I’m really not getting better at them in any significant way. Anyway, I know I’m not alone here; I’m sure you have activities in your life that you’ve done over and over, and that you now find yourself doing again. I’m also sure that those activities change you very little, if at all; they simply take up time.

The GMAT, though, is the exact opposite kind of activity. The GMAT is an adaptive test, meaning that a few questions in, it basically starts to notice what type of question pushes you close to the limit of what you’re capable of, but is still something that you can actually solve, or at least come close to solving. Then it gives you that type of question over and over again. How amazing is that? The GMAT is a test where every question after the first one is hand-selected just for you! It’s true that some of the questions will be a little harder than you can do, but that’s fine, because another good thing about the GMAT is that you can get a ton of questions wrong and still get a good score. I don’t know about you, but this is my ideal activity: a series of puzzles that I’ve never seen before, wherein none of the puzzles individually are high-stakes (as long as I try my best on every one, I’ll be okay in the end). There is absolutely nothing mundane about the GMAT, and I think an opportunity to do something like that is rare, special, and to be treasured, don’t you?

Those Who Prepare for the GMAT Will Be Rewarded
I’ve heard a criticism of the GMAT that it only rewards people who can crunch numbers and analyze dense articles quickly. But to me, that criticism misses the point a little bit; I actually think the GMAT rewards people who spend a whole lot of time before they take the test thinking about the most efficient way to solve novel problems. Those people, when they sit down to take the GMAT, don’t have to crunch as many numbers or wade through as many words; they are better able to cut to the things that matter and shortcut the things that don’t, and in doing so, they enjoy the test much more. In other words, the GMAT is a test that rewards responsible long-term preparation and study behavior even more than it rewards in-the-moment cleverness. So think of your study routine as learning how to solve puzzles, and think of the real test as an exciting, brain-engaging, escape from doing laundry and sitting in traffic. It’s just a minor shift in perspective, but it makes all the difference: you’re going to study anyway, so you may as well enjoy it.

RELATED: What You Don’t Need to Know for the GMAT

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. Check out our upcoming courses here.

ImageRyan Jacobs is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in San Francisco, California. He has an MBA from UC San Diego, a 780 on the GMAT, and years of GMAT teaching experience. His other interests include music, photography, and hockey. Check out Ryan’s upcoming GMAT prep offerings here.



The post How to Enjoy Taking the GMAT appeared first on GMAT.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
http://manhattangmat.com
Manhattan GMAT Online Marketing Associate
User avatar
Joined: 14 Nov 2013
Posts: 244
5 GMAT Grammar Mistakes We All Make  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Feb 2020, 14:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: 5 GMAT Grammar Mistakes We All Make
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/02/mprep-blogimages-wave1-48-e1582925278852.png[/img]

Music and the GMAT
Before we talk about grammar, let’s talk about music.  Trust me. I’ll bring it back.

When I turned 30, I started taking piano lessons.  Beyond a vague recollection of butchering “Hot Cross Buns” on a plastic recorder in third grade, I’d never had any musical training whatsoever.  I quickly discovered that music isn’t just about pressing buttons at the right time to make the notes come out; it’s also about learning to listen for rhythms, harmonies, and intervals between notes.  When you learn to notice these things, you start hearing them everywhere and wondering how you ever missed them. Better yet, you start to notice your own musical successes and mistakes before someone else points them out to you.

But here’s the challenge: how do you listen for a note out of place if you never had 4/4 time signature ingrained in your skull to begin with?  My piano teacher will tell you that it’s simple – that you need to start with a metronome and listen to it tick so closely that its relentless tick follows you around even when you sleep.  Okay, okay, he didn’t say it quite like that, but still…

Let’s bring it back to the test at hand.  In any GMAT course I’ve taught, it’s only a matter of time before I have students say something like: “That choice doesn’t sound right,” or “I like the way that one feels.” Such students are using their “ear” the same way a musician does, instinctively sensing when something is off or not.  This comes up throughout the test, but I sense it most acutely when we work on sentence correction questions (the ones where you fix the badly written sentences).

If there were such a thing as a “grammar metronome” it would be an incredibly helpful tool for spotting these missed beats.  But English isn’t so regular. And you often can’t get by just by picking whichever choice “sounds best.” When the questions get tougher, all the sentences might sound terrible.  Worse yet, the shortest, snappiest choice might be the most egregiously wrong. Therein lies the challenge: how do we train our ears to spot the mistakes that come up time and time again on the GMAT?  

In the remainder of this blog entry, we will work to develop that “grammar metronome” by examining five grammar rules that none of us follow anyway – at least in conversational English.  Unless you spend all day hanging out with that annoying guy who refuses to end a sentence in a preposition, you likely hear these rules violated just about as often as you hear them followed.  In fact, each of the bold statements below contains a mistake. Try to spot them before I point them out to you.

[b]Common GMAT Grammar Mistake #1: I often misuse this word, which leads me to believe that you might too.[/b]
I’ve already committed one grave error. Unless you’re deep into your GMAT studies, I bet you missed it.   In the sentence above, examine the word “which.” What does it refer to? The word “which” is a pronoun. It needs to refer to a thing – a noun.  I challenge you to find that noun in the sentence above. 

It’s not “I.”  It’s not “word.”  Neither of those on its own would lead me to believe that you too are a grammar-rule-flouter.  It’s a bigger idea, my misuse of the word, that makes me think you break the rule as well.

To fix this one, give “which” something to refer to or eliminate it entirely:

“I often misuse this word, leading me to think that you might too.”

“I often misuse this word, which you probably misuse too.”

[b]Common GMAT Grammar Mistake #2: Almost unnoticeable, I hear this mistake made all the time in conversation.[/b]
Found it? 

That first phrase – “almost unnoticeable” is a description – an “opening modifier” in GMAT lingo.  What is it describing?

Presumably, I meant it to describe the mistake. It’s the mistake that’s unnoticeable.  That said, the placement of the phrase is important. Unfortunately, it’s closest to the word “I.”   If “I” were unnoticeable, I’d make a great cat burglar. This sentence isn’t about me sneaking about through the night thieving valuables, though.  It’s about a mistake that’s hard to notice.

To fix this one, place the noun to be modified right next to the opening modifier:

“Almost unnoticeable, this mistake crops up often in conversation.”

[b]Common GMAT Grammar Mistake #3: Being a common error, this one might slip past you too.[/b]
How’s that ear training going?  Did you take a second to look for this one before I point it out to you?

“Being” is a problematic word on the GMAT.  Whenever I see it, my ears perk up in anticipation of something awry.  This doesn’t mean there’s necessarily a mistake, it just cues me to look for one.  Here’s the problem with “being” in this instance. It’s unnecessary. If a word does not contribute to the sentence in any way, get rid of it.

In the olden days, some instructors supposedly told their students to hunt for any instance of the word “being” and cross out any answer choice that used it.  I really doubt anyone gave such overreaching advice, but whatever the case, don’t go to this extreme. There are plenty of instances in which the GMAT question-writers use this word correctly.  Like a note out of key or played on an off-beat, it might just be part of the music. The problem is when it’s unnecessary.

The sentence works just fine without “being,” so cut it out:

“A common error, this one might slip past you too.”

[b]Common GMAT Grammar Mistake #4: Do like I do, and you’ll be butchering your comparisons.[/b]
As the sentence states, this one has to do with a botched comparison.  If you need a hint, think about this popular (and correctly written) phrase:

“Do as I say, not as I do.”

Do you notice the difference between that phrase and the one in the bold sentence above it?  I used the word “like” instead of the word “as.” This rule is simple: “like” compares two things, “as” compares two actions.

To fix this sentence, then, we have a couple of options:

“Do as I do, and you’ll be butchering your comparisons.”

“Write sentences like this one, and you’ll be butchering your comparisons.”

[b]Common GMAT Grammar Mistake #5: Adjectives and adverbs sometimes have similar forms that we use interchangeable.[/b]
The sentence itself is another good hint here.  Do you spot an adjective that should be an adverb? Both words are modifiers – they describe something else in the sentence.  Adjectives describe nouns. Adverbs describe verbs and some other stuff. In this sentence, the adjective “interchangeable” should be an adverb. “Interchangeably” describes the way we use the words, not the words themselves.

This error might seem simple enough here, but there are numerous examples in English where adjectives and adverbs are so similar that they do in fact seem to be interchangeable:

Bad & Badly

Interchangeable & Interchangeably

Slower & More slowly

Such words are often mistakenly swapped in conversational English.  In the GMAT, they come up often in comparison questions too.

To fix this one, you’ve again got a couple of options:

“Adjectives and adverbs sometimes have similar forms that we use interchangeably.”

“Adjectives and adverbs sometimes have seemingly interchangeable forms that we use mistakenly.”

[b]Retrain your Ear[/b]
Knowing your grammar is a crucial piece of GMAT mastery.  No, you won’t ever have to conjugate a verb, identify a gerund, or label the independent and dependent clauses in a sentence. Regardless, you do need to know the rules well enough to spot the good grammar and cross out the bad.  When you’re writing emails, surfing your news feed, or chatting with your friends, take a moment to notice the grammar. If you start spotting these mistakes “in the wild,” so to speak, your ears will learn to perk up whenever you see them.  If you train your ears, you’ll spot them quickly on the GMAT, where seconds are precious and you want every point you can get.\

[b]RELATED: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/im-bad-at-grammar-and-other-lies-you-tell-yourself/]“I’m Bad at Grammar” and Other Lies You Tell Yourself[/url]

[b]Don’t forget that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GRE courses absolutely free. We’re not kidding! [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gre/classes/free/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[img]https://www.manhattanprep.com/gre/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2020/01/tom-anderson-gre-hacks.png[/img]

[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/tom-anderson/][b]Tom Anderson[/b][/url][b] is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in New York, NY.[/b] He has a B.A. in English and an M.S. in education. Tom started his teaching career as a  New York City Teaching Fellow and is currently a Math for America Fellow. Outside of teaching the GRE and the GMAT, he is an avid runner who once (very unexpectedly) won a marathon. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gre/classes/#instructor/53]Check our Tom’s upcoming GRE prep offerings here. [/url]



The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/5-gmat-grammar-mistakes-we-all-make/]5 GMAT Grammar Mistakes We All Make[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
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Mastering Memorization Techniques  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Mar 2020, 14:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: Mastering Memorization Techniques
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“I’m Bad at Memorization” and Other Lies You Tell Yourself
Did you know that your ability to memorize and recall information is not only a skill, but also an improvable one? Most people are born with approximately the same ability to memorize information. If you’re fluent in a language, any language, you’ve memorized at least tens of thousands of words that you can instantly recall and use. So why is it so hard to remember what the cube of five is? Or to remember that before you start reading a sentence correction sentence, you should take a glance first at the answer choices?

How Memorization Works
Memories come from an electrical impulse within the brain. Each time you recall the same memory, you strengthen the pathway that impulse uses. In a way, these impulses are similar to muscles. The more you use them, the stronger they get. This is why so many of the memorization techniques focus on repetition.

However, memory is more complex than that. When you first learn something, it takes a significant amount of concentration and effort. As you continue to practice it, it becomes more natural and less deliberate. “Practice makes perfect” comes from the idea that you should do something again and again until it’s second nature.

The problem is that many learners attempt to memorize by reading the same thing over and over. Yes, it is true that repetition is key. But re-reading and repetition are not equivalent. It’s possible that re-reading will work for you. But the odds are not in your favor.

How to Memorize Information
If repetition is the key to memorization, but repetition is not enough to help you memorize, what should you do? Redefine repetition. Reading over and over is not particularly useful, but recalling information is. The best way to strengthen memory pathways is to continue to bring the thing you are trying to remember to the front of your mind, not through reading it again, but through forcing yourself to remember it.

That means you should read something on paper only as much as you need to. Then, without looking at the paper, ask yourself to repeat the information in your mind again and again until you can remember it without trying. Ideally, you should wait until you have almost forgotten that information, then ask yourself to remember it. Each time, you should be able to recall it a little faster and more clearly, so you can wait a little longer before testing yourself again.

This is why flashcards are used as a memorization aid. Instead of re-reading notes, flashcards give a prompt that forces the learner to recall, rather than reread, particular information. They are particularly effective when used with something like the Leitner System, which encourages frequent review of information that is hardest to recall, while reviewing information that is somewhat easier to recall less often. Again, the goal is to almost forget, then to force yourself to remember.

How to Apply Memorization on the GMAT
If the GMAT were a vocabulary test, then rote memorization might be enough to get you through. However, it’s not enough to simply learn facts; you must also apply them to new situations designed to challenge you. The application of particular memories is a skill. Saying you “just need more practice” is both a little bit true and not as helpful as it could be.

Practice is only helpful if you’re practicing good habits. If you make a mistake, recognize the mistake, then go on to continue making that mistake, all that changes is your level of frustration. Instead, prioritize the indications that a certain strategy or fact should come to the forefront of your mind. One way to think of these indications is in an “if…then” framework. You can remember good habits more easily by learning that “If you see X, then you will do Y.”

Here are a few examples of good habits using triggers you’re likely to see on test day:

  • If I see an SC split between “comma which” and “comma -ing,” then I will find out what the modifier is describing.
  • If I see a word problem with simple answer choices, then I will consider working backwards instead of creating algebraic expressions.
  • If I don’t understand what an RC sentence or paragraph is saying, then I will focus on structural keywords to figure out the purpose.
  • If I see the addition of two terms with exponents, then I will look for common factors to remove in order to simplify.
Just like memorizing facts, these processes and procedures need to be memorized so you can apply them seemingly instinctively. Flashcard these applications, learn them, then practice them with real questions. Knowledge by itself is insufficient without knowing when to apply it. Your ability to memorize is improvable and can be used effectively to help you get through the GMAT in the most efficient way possible.

UP NEXT: “I’m Bad at Grammar” And Other Lies You Tell Yourself

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. Check out our upcoming courses here.

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Emily Madan is a Manhattan Prep instructor located in Philadelphia, Pa. She has a master’s degree in chemistry and tries to approach the GMAT and LSAT from a scientific perspective. These tests are puzzles with patterns that students can be taught to find. She has been teaching test prep for over ten years, scoring a 770 on the GMAT and 177 on the LSAT. Check out Emily’s upcoming LSAT courses here.

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Top 3 GMAT Study Mistakes (and How to Fix Them)  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Mar 2020, 06:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: Top 3 GMAT Study Mistakes (and How to Fix Them)
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/02/mprep-blogimages-wave1-53-1-e1582816776579.png[/img]

[b]GMAT Study Mistake #1: Not Creating and/or Following a Study Plan[/b]
“Read books, practice problems, take test.” This, I’m sad to say, is not a study plan. This is…really just a series of facts.

A plan is actionable (these statements are not). Creating a good plan means you should never need to ask, “Am I doing the right things?” You already know! The right things were part of your plan.

A GMAT study plan includes the following elements:

[list]
[*][b]Benchmark. [/b]Take your first Computer Adaptive Test (CAT). This is not meant to predict your final score, so don’t set unrealistic goals and then judge yourself for not meeting your (unreasonably) high standards. Instead, use it to understand how much improvement you’d like to make to reach your final goal score. You should research your top school choices to settle on a goal score that works best for you. [/*]
[*][b]Set a consistent schedule[/b]. Consider how much you can study each week – be realistic! “Well, I work 40 hours full-time, and I have 12 children, and I volunteer 10 hours a week so I can study…40 hours per week?” No! It’s much better to get ahead in your studying than to fall behind. In total, most students study about 100-150 total hours before taking the official exam. This, along with the number of hours per week you can study, will help you determine when you should take the official exam.[/*]
[*][b]Focus on your weaknesses. [/b]We all like to study for our strengths and ignore our weaknesses, but in the GMAT this will not yield success. When you take a CAT, pay attention to your section scores (1-51)in Quant and Verbal. Focus your study time on the section in which you achieved the lower score, because you have more opportunity to improve. Many CATs will also list your performance on specific topics in a section. If that’s the case, focus first on topics that had the largest number of questions [b]and [/b]that were lower-difficulty problems. Don’t jump into the pool without your floaties![/*]
[*][b]Focus on quality over quantity.[/b] You’re creating a masterpiece, not working on an assembly line! Do not exhaustively complete practice problem after practice problem, hoping to “see it all” or “be a hard worker.” Instead, spend at least 30 minutes evaluating each problem you see. When you evaluate:
[list]
[*]Analyze other approaches you could have used and decide if yours could have been better.[/*]
[*]Identify patterns you saw in the problem, errors you made, and what you can take away.[/*]
[*][b]Physically write down[/b] how you can recognize and use what you’ve learned on future problems.[/*]
[*]Return to past problems every 2 weeks to insure you internalized the lessons.[/*]
[/list]
[/*]
[*][b]Re-assess and adjust your plan. Every great plan allows for adjustments along the way. Take CATs about every 10 – 14 days, depending on your schedule. Use the results to adjust your focus. Did you improve significantly in number properties, but didn’t see improvement in critical reasoning assumptions? Focus on those problems next! [/b]You can’t sit down and “study for the GMAT” in a single session. Your best chance of improving overall is to focus on specific areas, one at a time. Don’t forget to maintain in sections you’ve already covered.[/*]
[/list]
[b]GMAT Study Mistake #2: Avoiding Timed Computer Adaptive Tests (CATs)[/b]
The GMAT is a test of your management skills, including time management.

For the quantitative section, you can spend about 2 minutes per question to reach the end of the section. For verbal questions, you only have about 1 minute 20 seconds per question.

While you can master content without taking CATs, knowing that you can complete a problem is a far cry from knowing that you can complete a problem[b] in 2 minutes or less. [/b]

CATs will help you master timing on the exam, as well as learn the strategies you should use to catch up  if you’re falling behind in a section.

Still not convinced? Read this article, “[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/everything-you-need-to-know-about-gmat-time-management-part-1-of-3/]Everything You Need to Know about Time Management, Part 1[/url].”

[b]GMAT Study Mistake #3: Not Setting an Official Test Date[/b]
“I’ll study until I’m ready” is a common adage I hear from students. I always ask, “How will you know when you’re ready?”

I can practically guarantee that you will not wake up one sunny morning thinking, “Today is the day that I will ace the GMAT.” Even if that morning does arrive – you won’t get into the testing center without an appointment.

One of the greatest gifts you can give yourself is a deadline. This will help you to set daily and weekly study goals and it will increase the likelihood that you hold yourself accountable to those goals. Procrastination is much less appealing with a looming deadline on the calendar than without one.

When setting your test date, consider your study plan, application deadlines, and personal/professional schedule. Choose a date that allows you to study sufficiently (150+ hours), occurs about 2 months before applications are due so you can re-test if needed, and doesn’t fall in the midst of hectic times for your personal or professional schedule.

[b]RELATED: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-register-gmat/]How and When to Register for the GMAT[/url]

[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/01/tiffany-updated-219x300.jpg[/img]

[b][url=https://www.google.com/url?q=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/instructors/&sa=D&ust=1580507673877000&usg=AFQjCNEeL8gZxT52uu8FafKP5QStuw0cYA]Tiffany Berkebile[/url] is Manhattan Prep instructor located in Los Angeles, California. [/b]She realized her personal love of teaching while getting her M.A. in Communication Studies and teaching undergraduate college courses. She has over 10 years of experience teaching including ESL (she also speaks Spanish). While not tackling the GMAT, Tiffany enjoys doing Logic Puzzles, reading, and thinking about nerdy topics like space travel and how the pioneers lived.

The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/top-3-gmat-study-mistakes-and-how-to-fix-them/]Top 3 GMAT Study Mistakes (and How to Fix Them)[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
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How to Take a GMAT Practice Test  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Mar 2020, 13:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: How to Take a GMAT Practice Test
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/03/mprep-blogimages-wave1-52-4-e1583441001222.png[/img]

While you study for the GMAT, you should take a practice test every 1-3 weeks. Here’s how to get started and how to get more out of every GMAT practice test you take.

[b]Which GMAT practice test should you take? [/b]
You can take either an official practice test [url=https://www.mba.com/exam-prep/gmat-official-starter-kit-practice-exams-1-and-2-free]from the same folks who write the GMAT[/url], or a third-party test, [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/free-gmat-practice-test/]like the ones we’ve written here at Manhattan Prep[/url].

An official GMATPrep practice test is the closest you’re going to get to the real test-day experience. The test looks and feels like the real thing, and the questions are official (albeit retired) ones. The GMAC hasn’t revealed whether its practice tests use the same scoring algorithm as the real GMAT; however, at the very least, they were created by the same organization and should ostensibly be similar.

The downside to the official practice tests is that it’s harder to learn from them afterwards. The problem explanations are weak to nonexistent, and they don’t give you as much data to analyze as many third-party practice tests. That doesn’t mean you can’t effectively review a GMATPrep test! It just means that the analysis won’t be at your fingertips instantly.

For that reason, I recommend taking third-party practice tests during most of your GMAT study process, in order to really dig into the results and analyze your strengths and weaknesses. Then, take a couple of official practice tests in the weeks prior to test day, with your final practice test being a GMATPrep test one week before the real thing.

[b]Which GMAT practice tests are the best?[/b]
This question can mean two different things:

[list]
[*]Which practice tests are the most valuable study tool? [/*]
[*]Which practice tests will most accurately predict my GMAT score? [/*]
[/list]
I’m obviously biased, but I can vouch for the MPrep practice tests as a study tool without hesitation. Check out this series of articles, in which GMAT instructor Stacey Koprince goes over [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/analyze-gmat-practice-tests-part-1/]the many useful things you can do with your MPrep practice test results[/url]. Anecdotally, I’ve heard that our Quant section feels a little harder than the real GMAT (although not every student I’ve discussed this with agrees!). From a study skills perspective, that isn’t necessarily a bad thing: if you can train for a marathon wearing heavy jogging shoes, you’ll feel awesome when you’re wearing your ultra-light racing flats on race day!

The second question is harder to answer. It’s really tough to get good data about whether any practice test accurately predicts scores. Various people have tried to compile this data, but only the GMAC has access to both the official score data and the practice test data that you’d need to do a full analysis. As far as I can tell, they haven’t revealed it.

Even if the data were to show that a practice test gave inaccurate scores, there are a number of complicating factors: the test day environment is different from the practice test environment, and this affects people in different ways. A test that gives inflated scores on average may or may not do the same in your specific case. For more, see this article on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/official-gmat-score-lower-practice-test-scores/]why your official score might be lower than your practice scores[/url]. 

I recommend that you use your practice test scores primarily to track trends, test different approaches (like doing the sections in a different order), and get a very broad sense of whether you’re likely to score in your goal range. That’s really all you need to know before test day, even if it might be nice to have a perfect prediction of your score! If you’ve just scored a 700 on any reputable practice GMAT, you definitely have the skills to earn a 700 on test day. If you score a 640 when you start with Verbal and a 710 when you start with Quant, you should probably start with Quant on test day, even if you don’t end up scoring exactly 710.

[b]Your GMAT practice test-taking environment matters[/b]
Don’t dive into your practice test immediately. Prepare your environment first.

Make certain that you won’t be interrupted while taking your practice GMAT. Sit at a desk or table in a quiet, unstimulating room. (If you plan to wear the provided headphones or earplugs on test day, do so during your practice test as well.) Prepare a snack and a drink to have during your break; otherwise, don’t eat or drink while taking the practice test. Put your phone and electronics, other than the computer you’re using for the test, out of the way. And close any other programs running on that computer so you won’t be distracted.

If you’re taking a Manhattan Prep course, you should have already received a “yellow pad” that’s just like the one you’ll take notes on during test day. Use it while you take your practice test! If you’re not taking a course, you can also purchase the yellow pad here.

Before you begin, take a few minutes to quietly reflect on your goals for the practice test. Articulate two or three [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMART_criteria]SMART goals[/url]. By the way, achieving a specific score isn’t a SMART goal, since it isn’t “attainable”: you only directly control your choices and your behavior, not your score. Focus on what you’ll actually do during the practice test, not on the results. For instance, you might want to [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/which-gmat-problems-should-i-guess-on-part-1-how-guessing-affects-your-score/]guess on more problem[/url]s or [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/everything-know-gmat-time-management-part-3/]use timing benchmarks[/url].

[b]How to take a GMAT practice test[/b]
If your main goal is to estimate your score, then [b]take the whole test realistically[/b]. Back in the day, when the essays and IR section always came first, that included taking those two sections to simulate the fatigue you’d feel on test day. Nowadays, since you can do those sections at the end of the test, you don’t necessarily have to do them on every practice test. (Do them at least once or twice before test day, though, so you know what you’re doing before you get there!) No matter what, definitely take both the Quant and Verbal sections, and take them using only the amount of time you’ll be allotted on test day. Do your best to finish each section in its entirety. Don’t pause the test, extend your break time, or take any additional breaks. That’s how you’ll get the best possible estimate of your real GMAT score.

If your main goal is to practice test-taking skills, a practice test may not even be what you need! If what you really need is to work on Sentence Correction, only a third of the Verbal section will really be helpful: the rest might be a waste of your time and a waste of a practice test. Practice tests are valuable, but be clear about what they’ll actually help you practice: when you take one, you’re working on staying alert and attentive, managing boredom, fatigue, and anxiety, and switching quickly between different topics and concepts. Those are important skills to practice, but they aren’t the only skills you need to ace the GMAT.

[b]What to do after your GMAT practice test[/b]
After you finish a practice test, take a break: you’ve earned it. A practice test produces mental, and even physical, fatigue. Don’t beat yourself up over the score if it isn’t what you hoped for. A score on a practice test, whether good or bad, is valuable data that will help you decide where to go next.

In a day or two, it’s time to start reviewing! In the meantime, here’s some guidance on how to do a fantastic job of reviewing GMAT problems. If you take each practice test effectively, and review it effectively, you can expect to learn a lot from each one you take.

[b]Tips for reviewing GMAT practice problems: [/b]

[list]
[*][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-review-a-data-sufficiency-question/]How to review Data Sufficiency[/url][/*]
[*][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-review-a-gmat-reading-comprehension-question/]How to review Reading Comprehension [/url][/*]
[*][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-review-a-sentence-correction-question/]How to review Sentence Correction[/url][/*]
[*][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-review-a-gmat-critical-reasoning-problem/]How to review Critical Reasoning[/url][/*]
[*][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/analyze-gmat-practice-tests-part-1/]Reviewing your practice tests[/url][/*]
[/list]
[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[b][b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/chelsey-cooley/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgre%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=CooleyBioGREBlog&utm_campaign=GRE%20Blog][img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gre/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2015/11/chelsey-cooley-150x150.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/chelsey-cooley/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgre%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=CooleyBioGREBlog&utm_campaign=GRE%20Blog]Chelsey Cooley[/url] is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Seattle, Washington.[/b] [/b]Chelsey always followed her heart when it came to her education. Luckily, her heart led her straight to the perfect background for GMAT and GRE teaching: she has undergraduate degrees in mathematics and history, a master’s degree in linguistics, a 790 on the GMAT, and a perfect 170Q/170V on the GRE. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/#instructor/336]Check out Chelsey’s upcoming GMAT prep offerings here[/url].



The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-take-a-gmat-practice-test/]How to Take a GMAT Practice Test[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Should I get an MBA?  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2020, 12:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: Should I get an MBA?
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/03/mprep-blogimages-wave1-41-e1583869158298.png[/img]

This post was written by [url=https://www.mbamission.com/who-we-are/team/nisha-trivedi/]Nisha Trivedi[/url], an [url=https://www.mbamission.com/]mbaMission[/url] Senior Consultant.

Do I really need an MBA? These days, with the U.S. economy booming and more and more jobs (particularly in tech) seeming to value work experience over an advanced degree, people are starting to question whether business school is the best route to where they want to go professionally—whether it is truly worth the investment. We would argue that an MBA can definitely add a great deal to both your professional and personal growth. Here are some key reasons to consider pursuing the degree:

[b]Top 9 Reasons to Get an MBA[/b]
[b]Reason to get an MBA #1: Incomparable Instruction in “Hard” Business Skills[/b]
Although you can technically acquire basic business knowledge and skills (e.g., financial analysis, applying strategic frameworks, interpreting balance sheets) via online courses and books, the depth and intensity with which you learn in an immersive MBA program far surpasses what is possible through any other venue. For example, the first-year core curriculum at some top programs has even been referred to as “boot camp”—the course work is rigorous, extensive, fast paced, and, for some, truly grueling. In addition, some schools teach via the “case method,” in which students tackle real-world business problems by putting themselves in the shoes of the major decision makers (e.g., CEO, CFO, head of marketing) and providing analysis-based recommendations on how the firm involved should proceed. As students engage with and challenge one another on their assumptions and conclusions in the classroom, faculty members facilitate the discussions. Sometimes, the actual protagonist(s) of the case will even come to class to share what actually happened. No book or online course can offer that kind of experience. If you really want to understand business and “speak the language” of various functions within a company, the most powerful way to do so is via business school.

[b]Reason to get an MBA #2: Valuable Training in “Soft” Business Skills[/b]
Business school graduates often say that some of the most important takeaways from their MBA program relate to “softer” skills, such as leadership, teamwork, and people management. As a fellow Michigan Ross MBA recently told me, “The soft skills I learned in ‘Leadership Development’ [class] have made earning the trust and support of my colleagues much easier each time I’ve transitioned to a new organization.” Such courses prepare you to address interpersonal questions and situations that can be critical to your success at work: How do you influence cross-functional team members over whom you have no authority? How do you negotiate for a favorable outcome, such as a higher salary? How do you collaborate effectively with individuals who have different backgrounds, perspectives, and ideas? In business school, you not only get instruction in ways to approach these kinds of issues, but you also have the opportunity to practice what you learn before you find yourself in a real workplace environment that could entail serious legal, financial, or professional repercussions.

[b]Reason to get an MBA #3: Hands-On Learning Opportunities[/b]
Most, if not all, of the top business schools offer classes, programs, and projects in which small teams of students work directly with companies and nonprofits around the world to solve actual business problems the organizations are facing, in real time. As a result, they get firsthand insight into how these firms operate, while also making excellent insider connections. Sometimes, students then parlay their engagement with the sponsor company into a summer internship or even a full-time position after graduation. Some recent hands-on projects at one of the leading MBA programs include building practical go-to-market strategies for Microsoft to effectively engage with university students, recommending to Marriott International how to increase revenues from spa services in the Asia-Pacific region, and developing a business model for a therapeutic food product that treats severe malnutrition in Rwanda. In addition to providing valuable exposure to both business issues and people, these hands-on opportunities help participants learn to deal with something they are bound to face later in their careers: managing through ambiguity. Often, leaders must make decisions based on vague or incomplete information. By navigating the challenges of client engagements as an MBA student, you will develop the capabilities you will need to handle similar situations successfully in your own firm down the line.

[b]Reason to get an MBA #4: Aid in Changing Careers[/b]
Although making a significant career change on your own is possible, it is unquestionably difficult. Doing so via business school is not just easier but common. As an admissions consultant, I have worked with a field engineer turned investment banker, a nonprofit director turned operations consultant, and an engineer turned product manager. And one of my own MBA classmates switched from NFL player to consumer product marketer. The core MBA curriculum (covering finance, economics, marketing, operations, strategy, etc.) helps students develop overall business acumen, which is particularly essential for those who enter business school from nontraditional backgrounds or who have experience in only one or two business areas. Elective courses then provide specialized knowledge across functions and industries. In addition, via professional clubs (e.g., Consulting Club, Investment Management Club, Marketing Club), aspirants to certain careers gain in-depth exposure to what potential jobs actually entail, connect with companies of interest through career treks and conferences, and learn how best to apply to and interview with industry-specific recruiters. These resources enable business school students to effectively bridge the gap between their past experience and their future goals.

[b]Reason to get an MBA #5: Incomparable Job Search Resources[/b]
Whether MBA students are looking to change careers completely or just attain a better position in their current industry, their program’s career services office offers extensive resources, support, and firm access that will help them do so much more easily than they could on their own. These offices provide assistance with resume and cover letter preparation, advice about which jobs to consider, access to exclusive job postings, and the opportunity to do targeted mock interviews with highly trained representatives. In addition, the career services offices maintain relationships with recruiters from some of MBAs’ most sought-after firms, and these individuals come to campus to interview students for internships and full-time positions. These are definitive job search advantages you cannot get elsewhere.

[b]Reason to get an MBA #6: Opportunities for International Exposure[/b]
These days, business is increasingly global, and its leaders must have strong cross-cultural understanding to succeed. The top business schools give students valuable opportunities to gain the exposure and tools they will need to be able to collaborate with colleagues around the world or conduct business abroad. These include semester-long exchange programs with programs outside the United States, courses that involve one to three weeks working on-site with international company partners, international job treks, and one- to two-week global study trips, through which students collaborate directly with a non-US firm to address a global business problem. These programs instill in students a global mind-set that is far more profound than what can be gained from a brief work trip or personal travel.

[b]Reason to get an MBA #7: Entrepreneurial Support[/b]
If you dream of starting your own venture, business school will provide access to all the key elements you need for your best shot at success. In addition to the foundational business principles you gain from the program’s core curriculum, entrepreneurship-specific courses teach you what is involved in establishing an entirely new company. Among your classmates, you will find other aspiring entrepreneurs with whom you can network or possibly even join forces to start a venture together. In addition, many top MBA programs have on-site Entrepreneurs in Residence with whom you can meet to seek input and advice as needed. Most leading business schools also have annual entrepreneurship competitions that not only allow you to test the merits of your business idea and receive targeted feedback from experienced entrepreneurs but that also pay out thousands of dollars in prize money with which to fund your venture. And more and more programs are establishing business incubators to assist students with forming and launching their companies. Other opportunities include internships with early-stage companies, presentations and workshops by successful entrepreneurs, and chances to pitch your venture idea to school-affiliated venture boards for potential seed funding. In short, business school can greatly facilitate the process of turning your vision into a reality.

[b]Reason to get an MBA #8: An Expansive Network[/b]
The old expression “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know” is especially applicable to the world of business and your potential success within it. Business books and online courses may teach key concepts, but they provide very few, if any, new contacts (who may not be any better connected than you are). As an MBA student, however, you gain literally hundreds of contacts the minute you step on campus in the form of your classmates, not to mention those students in the classes before and after yours. And the immersive nature of business school—late-night group study sessions, group projects, team case competitions, conferences, social events—helps to forge tight bonds among students. You are also automatically connected with the entire alumni network of not only your business school but also its parent institution, which can number into the hundreds of thousands and include individuals all around the globe. Later, you can connect regularly with fellow graduates in your area through your local alumni organization and can interact through online databases and school-specific Facebook and LinkedIn groups. These contacts come in especially handy when one is seeking professional opportunities: many people I know are in their current positions because former MBA classmates or alumni passed along their resumes or gave them the inside scoop on job openings.

[b]Reason to get an MBA #9: Incredible Memories[/b]
MBA students inarguably work hard on their studies and job searches, but they “play” just as hard. Many business school alumni even refer to their MBA experience as a “two-year vacation.” All the top programs offer fun, unique, once-in-a-lifetime experiences that you simply could not have elsewhere. Imagine traveling to the Galapagos Islands for a week with 50 classmates or taking over Aspen, Colorado, for a long skiing and partying weekend with 150 or more fellow students. How about participating in a fund-raiser in which the most successful student gets to throw a pie in the face of an esteemed member of the school’s administration? Or perhaps you would enjoy performing in a schoolwide comedy show that lampoons life at your business school (aka “Follies”). Wine clubs, hockey leagues, casino nights, tailgate parties, international food and culture festivals, treks abroad, bar crawls, intramural competitions, chili cookoffs—the list goes on and on, and these activities provide more than just a refreshing break from the routine and work of earning an MBA; they create extraordinary memories and tight friendships among students that will last a lifetime.

Clearly, pursuing an MBA can be a valuable—and enjoyable—next step on your professional path. But ultimately, only you can decide whether attending business school is the best way for you to reach your professional and personal goals. You must weigh what you could gain from the degree with the time and financial investment that earning one requires.

[b]RELATED: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/mba-career-paths/]MBA Career Paths: What Are You Going to Do?[/url]

[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/03/nisha-trivedi-mba-mission-225x300.jpg[/img]

After being accepted to four top MBA programs—including New York University’s Stern School of Business, the UCLA Anderson School of Management, and the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University—Nisha Trivedi ultimately chose to earn her degree from the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. There, she focused on brand management and was an active member of the Marketing Club, organizing mock internship interviews for her peers during her first year and serving as the club’s vice-president of communications during her second year. Her BA in communications from the University of Pennsylvania and deep interest in understanding the consumer inspired her to initially pursue a career in marketing research, which led her to positions at Time Inc., Rosetta, and KPMG LLP in New York City, but after business school, Nisha worked for several years in brand management in San Francisco at Big Heart Pet Brands (now part of The J.M. Smucker Company). She most enjoys creating brand positioning and crafting tailored messaging that speaks to consumers’ needs—a skill she applies in helping her clients “market” themselves to their dream MBA programs. In addition to assisting her clients in a one-on-one capacity, Nisha is active on the mbaMission message boards, responding to questions and profile evaluation requests, and has authored several articles on the MBA admissions process for Poets&Quants.

[url=http://www.mbamission.com/][b]mbaMission[/b][/url] is the leader in MBA admissions consulting with a full-time and comprehensively trained staff of consultants, all with profound communications and MBA experience. mbaMission has helped thousands of candidates fulfill their dream of attending prominent MBA programs around the world.

The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/should-i-get-an-mba/]Should I get an MBA?[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
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Coronavirus GMAT Accommodations & Updates  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Mar 2020, 13:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: Coronavirus GMAT Accommodations & Updates
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/03/mprep-blogimages-wave1-35-e1584560695871.png[/img]

At Manhattan Prep, we’ve been closely monitoring the effects of COVID-19 in our communities. This is an immensely difficult time and our top commitment is to the health and safety of our students, employees, and the community. 

We know that COVID-19 is deeply disrupting your life right now, and it has the potential to delay your long-term goals for your career and education. You can still study effectively, though, and it’s also fine to delay your studies if needed—the GMAT isn’t going anywhere and neither are we.

To that end, we want you to know that we’re here for you. Here are ways we’re working to help you continue to achieve your goals, even in these tough circumstances:

[list]
[*][b]We’re Still Teaching Live (Online): [/b]Our services, including live teacher instruction, are still available, however our in-person classes and tutoring will be meeting online for now. You can [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/free/]try any of our classes for free[/url] (no credit card needed) to see whether it’s the right fit for you. Our online classes are small in size, have our expert 99th-percentile instructors, and cover the same rigorous curriculum as our in-person offerings. [/*]
[*][b]We’re Extending Your Online Resource Access Length to 1 Year: Our courses offer  students a standard six months of online access but we’re making a free additional six month access available to you so that you can have added flexibility during this time. We know your plans are fluctuating, and we don’t want you to have to worry about how long you have your resources. Just contact us by [email=gmat@manhattanprep.com]email[/email] or phone at 800-576-4628 to extend your access when they expire.[/b][/*]
[*][b]We’re Keeping You Up To Date[/b]: As updates come from grad schools and GMAC/Pearson, we’ll keep you in the loop. Below are some resources we recommend for staying in the know, study and work from home advice, plus some additional stress-relief.  [/*]
[/list]
We appreciate having you in our community and we’ve got your back. While this is an uncertain time, our team is leaning in every day to support you, and together we’re going to get through it. 

Thanks and stay healthy,

The Manhattan Prep Team

Study Advice & Recommended Resources
[b]GMAT & STUDYING:[/b]
[list]
[*]Stay informed about GMAT news from [url=https://www.gmac.com/why-gmac/gmac-news/update-on-coronavirus]GMAC[/url] and at [url=https://www.mba.com/articles-and-announcements/announcements/update-on-coronavirus]mba.com[/url]. [/*]
[*][b]UPDATE: [/b]The centers in the U.S. and Canada will be closed effectively immediately through at least April 16. Stay informed about Pearson Vue, who run the test centers that administer the GMAT, [url=https://home.pearsonvue.com/coronavirus-update]here[/url].[/*]
[/list]
[b]If you were planning to take the test in the next few weeks:[/b]
If you think you need only a few more weeks to be ready, then we’re going to need to stretch that out over a longer period. If you feel a little burned out, take a break for a few days—you’re not going to forget everything in half a week or even a week and your brain could use the rest. And you don’t need to maintain a 12-15 hour weekly study schedule; aim for ~8-ish hours instead (still enough to give you forward momentum). Take about 2 weeks to do what you’d planned to do in 1 week. If, on the other hand, you’re not burned out and want to study more intensively, go for it.

[b]If you are planning to take the test in later April or May:[/b]
You’re also likely going to need to stretch out your studies a bit more than you’d planned. Assume you’re not going to take it until May at the earliest. In addition, once testing resumes, there will be increased demand, so it may be harder to schedule—if you have the flexibility, you may want to wait until June / the summer. See the advice in the prior section for how to stretch out your studies.

[b]If you are planning to take the test in June or later:[/b]
At the moment, you don’t need to do anything differently—keep following your plan. We’ll see later whether an adjustment is needed.

[b]WORK/STUDY/PLAY-FROM HOME:[/b]
[list]
[*]Harvard Business Review has both an [url=https://hbr.org/2014/10/5-ways-to-work-from-home-more-effectively]article[/url] and a [url=https://hbr.org/video/6140518023001/how-to-actually-workwhen-youre-working-from-home]video[/url] on how to work from home efficiently. [/*]
[*]Mindfulness is something MPrep recommends in everyday life, and especially now, it can be useful if you’re feeling anxious or need some techniques for self-care. Here’s a free [url=https://soundcloud.com/user-91744640/15-minute-guided-mindfulness-practice]15 minute audio[/url] mindfulness meditation and also a [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKs8w_E9rKE]30 second video version[/url]. Or browse through this collection of free [url=https://www.calm.com/blog/take-a-deep-breath?utm_source=lifecycle&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=difficult_times_subs_031720]mindfulness resources[/url].[/*]
[*]The Museum Computer Network nonprofit has an extensive list of virtual museum tours, e-learning, and online collections. [url=http://mcn.edu/a-guide-to-virtual-museum-resources/]Check it out here[/url].[/*]
[*]MIT has virtually all of their course content available online for free at [url=https://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm]this site[/url].[/*]
[*]The Metropolitan Opera has free live audio streams of their operas [url=https://www.metopera.org/season/radio/free-live-audio-streams/]here[/url]. [/*]
[*]Broadway Plays and Musicals have live streams available [url=https://www.playbill.com/article/15-broadway-plays-and-musicals-you-can-watch-on-stage-from-home?fbclid=IwAR0XSdR5oAusoqrMBiPjT30CcfhlvBJY7HZ3GnR1Lzje5UbGF5dbwWLT97c]here[/url].[/*]
[*]Here’s [url=https://www.epicurious.com/recipes-menus/43-easy-pantry-recipes-soups-beans-burgers-pastas-gallery]43 recipes[/url] for cooking with whatever’s in your pantry.[/*]
[*]And here are some [url=https://nerdist.com/article/penguins-roam-empty-aquarium/]penguins[/url] visiting other animals in their aquarium. Because penguins![/*]
[/list]
[b]RELATED: [/b]

[list]
[*][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gre/blog/covid19/]Coronavirus GRE Accommodations and Updates[/url][/*]
[*][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/lsat/blog/covid19/]Coronavirus LSAT Accommodations and Updates[/url][/*]
[/list]


The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/covid19/]Coronavirus GMAT Accommodations & Updates[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
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How to Get Into a Top Business School  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2020, 06:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: How to Get Into a Top Business School
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/03/mprep-blogimages-wave1-32-1-e1584624866981.png[/img]

This post was written by [url=https://www.mbamission.com/who-we-are/team/debbie-choy/]Debbie Choy[/url], an [url=https://www.mbamission.com/]mbaMission[/url] Senior Consultant.

As an admissions consultant, I am asked frequently, “How do I get into a top business school?” Many candidates believe schools want a certain “type” of candidate—perhaps one with a stellar GMAT score or a certain kind of job. Yet, in my seven years of admissions consulting, I have seen candidates with all kinds of backgrounds receive offers from top business schools. In my experience, schools are not looking for a “type.” Rather, they are looking for a diversity of industry experience, functions, countries of origin, ethnic backgrounds, and also personal interests. As you approach the upcoming MBA application process, consider the following ideas to help you be successful.

[b]Should I retake the GMAT?[/b]
If your GMAT score is below the reported average at your preferred school, there is still time to do something about it. The GMAT is one component of your profile you can still change. Consider retaking the GMAT or taking an online course to beef up your weak areas. Many candidates take the GMAT more than once to get the score they want. There is no penalty or stigma attached to re-taking the test.

In addition, if you have not engaged with community organizations since college, it is never too late to start. Look into organizations for which you are personally passionate. For example, if you are an animal lover, consider volunteering at an organization such as the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA). If you are into fashion, organizations such as Dress for Success have locations nationwide.

[b]Make your business school application stand out[/b]
Although you do not have to be the best at everything you do, you should be different (meaning different in a good way!). Beyond doing what you can to shore up your profile, also be sure to show the admissions committee (AdCom) what unique perspectives you can bring to the school. This would primarily be conveyed in your application essays. Therefore, structure your essays so that you highlight your best strengths and stories. For example, how might your experiences working for a Midwestern manufacturing company bring a different perspective to your application?

[b]Go beyond the resume[/b]
Share your personal story of how you got where you are today. Do not be afraid to mention your vulnerabilities. For example, what challenges did you face in your job? What personal failures or disappointments did you encounter? Show the AdCom that you did not have a smooth path to success; explain how you struggled, stumbled, picked yourself up, and improved.

[b]Make your application well-rounded[/b]
The good news is that the AdCom reviews your profile holistically; its decision will be based on more than your statistics. So, be sure to show the committee as much of yourself as you can. At the end of the day, there is no single path to acceptance at a top business school. When you stand with your classmates on the first day of orientation and hear each other’s stories, you may find, to your surprise, that each person has followed a unique path to get there.

[b]RELATED: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/should-i-get-an-mba/]Should I Get an MBA?[/url]

[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/03/get-into-top-business-school-225x300.jpg[/img]

Fluent in both Mandarin and Cantonese, Debbie Choy earned her MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business and has been helping clients pursue their own MBA ambitions through mbaMission for seven application seasons. She was a management consultant with Booz & Co. and an investment analyst with JP Morgan before attending business school. After graduating, she worked in product marketing in the medical technology industry—developing an expertise in the planning and execution of product launches, product line management, and marketing strategy—and was actively involved in recruiting MBAs for her employer. Debbie also led an MBA recruiting program focused on the top programs for a fast-growing health care company, presented at career fairs, and directly interviewed candidates. As a co-founder of ALIST Magazine, which showcases Asian American corporate leaders and success stories, she oversaw a team of six staff writers and produced the column “Women At Work.” Debbie, who grew up in Singapore, graduated cum laude from Vassar College with a BA in international studies and rounds out her language skills by also speaking conversational French.

[url=http://www.mbamission.com/]mbaMission[/url] is the leader in MBA admissions consulting with a full-time and comprehensively trained staff of consultants, all with profound communications and MBA experience. mbaMission has helped thousands of candidates fulfill their dream of attending prominent MBA programs around the world. Take your first step toward a more successful MBA application experience with a free 30-minute consultation with one of mbaMission’s senior consultants.

The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-get-into-a-top-business-school/]How to Get Into a Top Business School[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Getting Past a GMAT Score Plateau  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2020, 14:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: Getting Past a GMAT Score Plateau
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/03/mprep-blogimages-wave1-56-1-e1584650443898.png[/img]

Is your GMAT score stuck? Are you starting to wonder whether to [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/stop-studying-gmat/]stop studying for the GMAT[/url]? If you’re in this situation, but you don’t have the score you want, try following this plan first.

[b]Improving Your GMAT Score[/b]
If your score isn’t going up, and you’ve taken more than a couple of practice tests (or official tests), that means [b]you’re making the same mistakes more than once[/b]. There are only so many different types of problems on the GMAT, and there are only so many different mistakes you can make. If you’re at a score plateau, you’re revisiting old mistakes.

It also means that [b]what you’re doing now isn’t effective[/b]. I left that statement somewhat vague on purpose, because “what you’re doing” could refer to a couple of different things. It’s possible that [b]what you’re doing while you take the GMAT[/b] isn’t effective. It’s also possible that [b]what you’re doing while you study[/b] isn’t effective. Or, it could be both.

You might also need to shake things up a bit. Maybe you’re mentally fatigued and [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/overcoming-gmat-burnout/]suffering from GMAT burnout[/url]. If your attitude towards the GMAT is one of stress, boredom, pessimism, anxiety, dread, fear, etc., you can’t just study your way out of it. Something has to change.

What follows is my plan for getting past a score plateau. It’s going to take [b]at least two weeks of hard work[/b] on your part. And I can’t guarantee that it will work! But it’s based on everything I’ve learned so far about how to study for the GMAT.

[b]Build your personalized GMAT Study Guide[/b]
To try to blast through the GMAT plateau, you’re going to choose [b]five things to focus on[/b] each week. Since everyone has different needs and goals, I’ll give you a list to pick each of these five things from. However, everybody’s plan will include the same basic elements:

[list]
[*]One new GMAT mindset-related skill;[/*]
[*]One new general test-taking skill; [/*]
[*]One new study method;[/*]
[*]Mastery of one type of GMAT Quant content;[/*]
[*]Mastery of one type of GMAT Verbal content. [/*]
[/list]
Let’s see your options!

[b]GMAT Score Improvement Tip #1: Learn one new mindset-related skill[/b]
From this list, choose [b]one[/b] thing to do for the next week. You can make your choice based on what you think you need the most, or you can choose randomly! All of these suggestions will help you with the GMAT, so there isn’t just one right choice. Just don’t try to do more than one of them. One thing that makes this plan work is that it lets you focus on just a few things for a little while, and takes some of the pressure off to do everything all at once!

[list]
[*]Read[url=https://www.healthline.com/health/positive-self-talk] this article about positive self-talk[/url]. Then, each time you catch yourself engaging in negative self-talk, change the channel! Say something positive about yourself instead. [/*]
[*]Do [url=https://soundcloud.com/user-91744640/15-minute-guided-mindfulness-practice]this 15-minute mindfulness session[/url] (or any short mindfulness recording that works for you) each day. [/*]
[*]For the next week, create some [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-handle-gmat-stress-without-freaking-out/]affirmations[/url] that resonate with you, and repeat them each morning and each evening. [/*]
[*]Commit to getting at least 7.5 hours of sleep every night for the next week. [/*]
[/list]
[b]GMAT Score Improvement Tip #2: Lean one new general GMAT test-taking skill[/b]
You’ve picked one way to master your mindset. Now, choose one test-taking skill to perfect over the next week, by picking one of the following exercises.

[list]
[*]Work on [b]stamina[/b] and [b]attention span [/b]by doing two 1-hour problem sets this week: one in Quant, and one in Verbal. For the Quant set, do 18 Problem Solving problems and 12 Data Sufficiency problems from the GMATPrep software. For the Verbal set, do three Reading Comp passages with a total of 11 questions; ten Sentence Correction problems; and eight Critical Reasoning questions. [/*]
[*]Work on [b]problem recognition[/b] by doing the following exercise: Open the Official Guide to the beginning of a Quant section. For each problem, without using pen and paper, decide [b]what material the problem is testing[/b], [b]what your plan is for solving it[/b], and [b]what traps or mistakes you need to be careful about. [/b]Try to do this for ten Quant problems within ten minutes (remember that you don’t have to solve them!). Then, go back and solve those ten problems, and evaluate how you did. Repeat 4-5 times over the course of the week. [/*]
[*]Work on [b]guessing[/b] by giving yourself a much shorter time limit than usual to do a set of random problems: 15 minutes for either 10 Quant problems, 15 Sentence Correction problems, or 8 Critical Reasoning problems. Your goal is to choose the right problems to guess on, as quickly as possible. If you’re doing a Quant set, you should quickly guess four times; guess six times for Sentence Correction, or three times for Critical Reasoning. See if you can spot the hardest problems in the set, make quick and reasonable guesses, and get all of the easier ones right. Repeat this exercise 4-5 times over the course of the week. [/*]
[/list]
[b]GMAT Score Improvement Tip #3: Learn one new GMAT study method[/b]
From the following list, choose[b] one[/b] new thing to do for the next two weeks. Again, only pick one of these things! We’re trying to shake up your study habits, not completely burn you out.

[list]
[*]Wake up 30 minutes earlier than normal each day, and spend that time reviewing GMAT material. [/*]
[*]Create three to five new [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gre/blog/heres-how-to-always-know-what-to-do-on-any-gre-problem/]“when I see this, do this” flashcards[/url] every day. [/*]
[*]Each day, read a new article from one of the websites linked in [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/gmat-reading-comprehension-tips/]this Reading Comprehension article[/url]. [/*]
[*][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/error-log-the-1-way-to-raise-your-gmat-score/]Create a problem log[/url] if you haven’t already, and take notes in your log on every single problem you do for two weeks (not just the ones you missed)![/*]
[*]Spend ten minutes every day doing [url=https://arithmetic.zetamac.com/]arithmetic drills[/url]. [/*]
[/list]
[b]GMAT Score Improvement Tip #4: Master a type of GMAT Quant content[/b]
Here’s a (non-exhaustive) list of [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/high-value-gmat-quant/]high-value GMAT Quant content[/url]. Choose [b]one [/b]of these areas, and really master it this week. Even if you already understand the topic fairly well, you have a week to become an expert. Start by reading a good chapter or article, or watching a video, about the topic: if you have the Manhattan Prep strategy guides or access to GMAT Interact, that’s a great place to start. Then, use the Official Guide to do practice problems on that topic. Finally, review all of those problems thoroughly and write about them in your problem log. For bonus points (not redeemable on the GMAT!), you can also [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gre/blog/tag/gre-quant-cheat-sheet/]create a cheat sheet for the topic[/url].

[list]
[*]Percent word problems[/*]
[*]Triangles[/*]
[*]Averages[/*]
[*]Overlapping sets[/*]
[*]Divisibility[/*]
[*]Positives/Negatives/Odds/Evens[/*]
[*]Exponents[/*]
[*]Square roots[/*]
[*]Linear equations[/*]
[*]Quadratic equations[/*]
[/list]
[b]GMAT Score Improvement Tip #5: Master a type of GMAT Verbal content[/b]
Here’s another list, this time for Verbal! A lot of people focus way too much on Quant, to the detriment of their overall GMAT score. If you have a certain overall score goal in mind, and you’ve plateaued while mostly studying Quant, this is your excuse to focus on Verbal for a little while. Pick one of these topics, and approach it this week in the same way described in the previous section.

[list]
[*]Sentence Correction: modifiers[/*]
[*]Sentence Correction: parallelism[/*]
[*]Sentence Correction: subject/verb agreement and sentence structure[/*]
[*]Critical Reasoning: assumptions[/*]
[*]Critical Reasoning: strengthen/weaken the argument[/*]
[*]Reading Comp: main idea[/*]
[*]Reading Comp: specific detail[/*]
[*]Reading Comp: inference[/*]
[/list]
[b]What you should have now[/b]
If you’ve followed along until this point, you should have a list of five things to do this week. [b]For now, ditch everything else you’re doing to study for the GMAT. [/b]After all, you’re trying to shake things up, try something new, and stop making the same old mistakes. Create a study calendar for the next week, making sure to include whichever mindset technique you’re going to try out. Then, for the next week, focus just on those five things and trust the process.

The following week… do it again! You can repeat any or all of your five choices, or try something totally new.

At the end of the two weeks, it’s time to take another practice test. You might be surprised to find that your score has gone up. If so, you now have some new things to incorporate into your process as you get back into your regular study routine. If not: you’ve still gotten some good data. You now know a couple of things that don’t work out very well for you, and you should, at the very least, be feeling refreshed and intellectually curious.

If you try this, let us know about it in the comments! I’d love to hear how you make this plan your own, and whether it helps you bust through a tough GMAT score plateau.

[b]RELATED: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/top-3-gmat-study-mistakes-and-how-to-fix-them/]Top 3 GMAT Study Mistakes (And How to Fix Them)[/url]

[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[b][b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/chelsey-cooley/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgre%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=CooleyBioGREBlog&utm_campaign=GRE%20Blog][img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gre/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2015/11/chelsey-cooley-150x150.jpg[/img][/url]
[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/chelsey-cooley/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgre%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=CooleyBioGREBlog&utm_campaign=GRE%20Blog]Chelsey Cooley[/url] is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Seattle, Washington.[/b] [/b]Chelsey always followed her heart when it came to her education. Luckily, her heart led her straight to the perfect background for GMAT and GRE teaching: she has undergraduate degrees in mathematics and history, a master’s degree in linguistics, a 790 on the GMAT, and a perfect 170Q/170V on the GRE. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/#instructor/336]Check out Chelsey’s upcoming GMAT prep offerings here[/url].



The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/getting-past-a-gmat-score-plateau/]Getting Past a GMAT Score Plateau[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
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How to Review GMAT Practice Questions  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2020, 06:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: How to Review GMAT Practice Questions
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/03/mprep-blogimages-wave1-55-4-e1584711744637.png[/img]

I got a really interesting question from one of my students this week: “What do you look for in our GMAT review logs?”

Backing up a bit: I teach GMAT classes. Every week, my students do GMAT practice questions for homework. Instead of asking them to turn in their scratch paper, I ask my students to create a spreadsheet where they log every one of these practice questions, which I call a “review log.” In addition to logging the quantitative data (problem number, time spent, right vs. wrong, etc.), I ask my students to write notes in three different categories: (a) “What went well?,” (b) “What didn’t go well?,” and (c) “What do I want to remember for next time?” I also tell them that any discussion of accuracy or time is irrelevant unless it’s tied to content, so for example, “I got this problem right” is not an acceptable answer to “What went well?” On the other hand, “Noticing that I could divide both sides by x since I was told x≠0 allowed me to get this problem right” is a very good answer.

There’s one other thing I look for too though, and it’s a little less obvious. I look for [b]future applicability[/b] of the notes. This is probably best demonstrated through example, so let me give you a fairly straightforward example of a sentence correction problem that I’ve pared down to two choices instead of the usual five:

[b]GMAT Practice Question 1:[/b]
Xavier drove to the store and bought the last bunch of bananas in the produce section.

(A) store and bought

(B) store, buying

Not much suspense here: (A) is the superior option. And because you likely came up with that answer quickly, you may be tempted to also make your notes quickly and be done with it. But before you move on, remember to think about future applicability. To help explain what I mean, I asked some of my students to write a review log entry on this problem. Here were their notes:

Student #1: “I noticed the difference between using ‘and’ and just using a comma, and the ‘and’ was better. I have definitely seen differences like this before, so I will make sure to keep an eye out for and vs. comma in the future, since it was helpful in this problem.”

Student #2: “I correctly thought about meaning while doing this problem. The word ‘and’ in the first choice is creating a list of things that Xavier did, while the word ‘buying’ starts a modifier. I know that comma + -ing modifiers are usually adverbial. So I tried to figure out whether this is a list of things that Xavier did, or whether buying bananas describes how Xavier drove. It’s definitely the first, not the second, so (A) is correct. Next time I see “and” vs. comma + -ing, I will check whether the list or the modifier makes more sense to use in that situation.

A couple comments: first, Student #2 did not just pull all of this info directly from her brain. She actually asked for a copy of the [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/all-the-gmat/]“All the Verbal” book[/url] that we provide our course students while she was working so that she could look up the “Modifiers” subchapter where -ing modifiers are discussed, a subchapter that she had clearly seen before. She wanted to make sure she was remembering the rule correctly before committing it to her spreadsheet. Second, there’s nothing incorrect about student #1’s notes: everything he wrote is true, and he is right to say that this kind of difference between answer choices will probably show up again.

All that said, you can probably see where I’m going with all of this. The last thing I did as part of this exercise was give each student a second problem:

[b]GMAT Practice Question 2:[/b]
Yvonne kicked the football and launched it 50 meters down the pitch.

(A) football and launched

(B) football, launching

Which student do you think got it right?

Go read student #1’s notes; nothing there prepared him for this second problem. In fact, he got this one wrong, because he just figured that the version with “and” was right the first time, so he just went for that one again. Student #2, on the other hand, thought about the meaning being created by each choice, and noticed that the phrase “launching it 50 meters” actually is additional info about Yvonne’s kick, and is not just an additional item in a list of things that Yvonne did. And by the way, if you’re an American like I am, you might not know that much about this kind of football, so that phrase after the comma is helpful because it makes it clear that 50 meters is a very strong kick (i.e. a “launch”). So (B) is the better choice here, which student #2 realized because her notes from the first problem had [b]more future applicability.[/b]

The takeaway here is that every GMAT problem you study needs to prepare you in some way, however small, for a future problem that you’ll actually see on the real test, and if it doesn’t, you’ve wasted your time. I won’t lie to you: creating notes with future applicability takes extra work. You have to read problem explanations multiple times. You will have to use your books as reference tools. You will probably spend 5 times as long reviewing the problem as doing the problem in the first place. You won’t get through nearly as many problems each day. But the future applicability of your review process is what really makes a difference on test day, and it’s what I look for in my students’ review logs every single time.

[b]NEXT: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/getting-past-a-gmat-score-plateau/]Getting Past a GMAT Score Plateau[/url]

[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[b][img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2018/02/ryan-jacobs-e1501597417957-150x150.png[/img][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/ryan-jacobs/]Ryan Jacobs[/url] is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in San Francisco, California.[/b] He has an MBA from UC San Diego, a 780 on the GMAT, and years of GMAT teaching experience. His other interests include music, photography, and hockey. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/#instructor/288]Check out Ryan’s upcoming GMAT prep offerings here[/url].



The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-review-gmat-practice-questions/]How to Review GMAT Practice Questions[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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My GMAT Was Cancelled. Now What?  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2020, 15:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: My GMAT Was Cancelled. Now What?
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/03/mprep-blogimages-wave1-73.png[/img]

As you no doubt know by now, many GMAT testing centers are currently closed as a result of the pandemic. How do you keep getting ready for the GMAT despite not knowing when you’ll actually be able to take it?

I had a class that ended on March 10th; many of my students had already booked their exams and are now finding themselves in the unenviable position of having to extend their studies for a potentially indeterminate length of time. I’ll be sharing with you the same thoughts that I shared with them.

First: We’ll keep our [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/covid19/]blog[/url] and other communication channels updated, but you can also go straight to the source: the [url=https://www.mba.com/articles-and-announcements/announcements/update-on-coronavirus]mba.com website[/url]. Both our page and the official one will keep you up to date on test center closures (and, eventually, reopenings) and any other news that will help you to plan.

[b]I’m really stressed out right now.[/b]
Me, too. Even in the best of times, it’s stressful to get ready for these kinds of exams—and of course you’re even more stressed right now. (It’s also normal to feel like you shouldn’t be stressed out about this when there are much bigger things going on in the world…even though you are still stressed out about it.)

Take a deep breath, as deep as you can. Breathe through your nose (so that it takes a long time) and let it out slowly. Loosen up your clenched abdominal muscles. Your plan has changed, yes, but you can still move forward in general.

I’ll address various scenarios below but first I have a question for you: Do you have more time on your hands right now or less time? If your work or family commitments mean that you have a lot less time to think about the GMAT right now, I’d recommend one of two paths: Postponement or Maintenance Mode.

[b]What’s Postponement?[/b]
Put your GMAT studies 100% on hold until you have the bandwidth to think about this again. Don’t give it a second thought—you have my permission. I’ve already recommended this to one of my students, based on that person’s circumstances.

[b]And what about Maintenance Mode?[/b]
This is for those who are too busy right now but think they will be able to pick back up in a month or so and don’t want to lose the progress they’ve made. Don’t try to learn new material or even improve your existing skills; your goal during these weeks is not to get better. Your goal is simply not to lose skills.

If you choose Maintenance Mode, plan to spend about 3 to 4 hours a week studying. Try a few of each problem type (timed!)—this is a great time to re-do some problems from your error log. Do some skill drills out of Foundations of Math or Foundations of Verbal, as needed. Review flash cards.

One more note: The world has changed and it makes sense to reevaluate your prior decisions in light of that. Think back to whenever you made the decision to study for the GMAT this year. If you’d known then what you know right now, would you still have chosen to take the GMAT now? If the answer is no or probably not, then rip the bandaid off: Skip Maintenance Mode and go straight to Postponement. You can pick things up again later this year or next year.

What if, instead, you have the same time—or even more time—to focus on the GMAT now? Read on.

[b]I was planning to take the exam this summer or fall.[/b]
Carry on. At the moment, you don’t need to worry about planning anything any differently than you would have if you had taken the GMAT last year at this time.

[b]I was going to take the exam in the next month or two. What do I do now?[/b]
You likely fall into one of two broad categories.

[b]Category 1: I think I need more time…[/b]

If you’d already been thinking that you could use more time, then assume you won’t take the exam before May or June and make a plan to lift your score or rededicate yourself to your studies, just as you would have done in normal times. It’s common for people to push back their original test date.

[b]Category 2: I was feeling good; I was almost ready to go…[/b]

If, on the other hand, your score is about in the range that you want and you were almost ready to go, then we have to talk about how to stretch out your studies—even though you don’t know exactly how long you need to take. It’s annoying. But humans have a pretty good track record of adapting. We’ll figure this out.

As of this writing, GMAC’s website is showing some appointments available in later April and in May, depending on location. If you haven’t already booked (or re-booked) your appointment, go ahead and register. (Yes, it’s possible that your new date will have to get pushed out, but it’s still a good idea to have a date to give you something to work toward.)

(Yes, it’s possible that your new date will have to get pushed out, but it’s still a good idea to have a date to give you something to work toward.)

[b]What do I do with the extra time?[/b]
The general study path for everyone is to work at improving your skills (and, therefore, your score) until you get yourself up into your desired scoring range. Then, spend the last 10 to 14 days training to “peak on game day”—like an athlete trying to peak on the day of the gold-medal match.

We’re not going to change that Game Planning period—it’ll still be your last 10 to 14 days. We’re going to add your extra time to the “Lift My Score” period.

Let’s say that you’d originally planned to take the real test in 3 weeks but you’ve rescheduled for 6 weeks from now, so you’ve got an additional 3 weeks of study time. You’ll still reserve your final 2 weeks for game planning, leaving you 4 weeks of primary study time. What do you do with that 4 weeks?

[b]If you are in Category 1 (need more time)[/b]
First, think about why you need more time. If you’ve found that your prior study hasn’t been as effective as you’d like, or you weren’t studying as much as you’d intended, use this as an opportunity to rededicate yourself to your studies. What wasn’t working for you before? What can you do differently in the coming weeks to help yourself work better? Ask friends, fellow students, and teachers for advice as well.

Next, two to four weeks is enough time to do one full Lift My Score cycle. One cycle consists of taking a practice test, analyzing it to categorize your strengths and weaknesses (more below), and then making a 2-3 week study plan based on your analysis.

Start by, [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/resources/how-to-review-your-gmat-practice-exam/]analyzing the data[/url] from your most recent practice test (if it’s been more than 3-4 weeks, you may want to take another) and figure out what your priorities should be right now. Put everything into one of three buckets:

[list]
[*]Bucket 1 Strengths: I’m already good here.[/*]
[*]Bucket 2 Priorities: My “opportunity” weaknesses—they’re not great, but they’re not terrible either. These are my best opportunities to improve.[/*]
[*]Bucket 3 Ignore For Now: My biggest weaknesses—not where I want to spend my time, as long as I still have Bucket 2 stuff I can use to lift my score.[/*]
[/list]
Spend the next few weeks working through Bucket 2 items, then roll into [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/last-14-days-gmat-part-1-building-game-plan/]Game Planning[/url] when the time comes. (There’s the link again so you don’t have to go find it earlier.)

[b]If you are in Category 2 (pretty good to go already)[/b]
If you’ve been studying, say, 12 to 15 hours a week, one option is to cut your time in half—that is, spread that time out over two weeks instead. You can still make real progress in 6 to 8 hours per week.

Alternatively, intersperse some Maintenance Mode weeks with your full study weeks to stretch the time out. So take a Maintenance Mode week this week (and maybe [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/2013/05/09/stressed-out-meditate-to-lower-your-anxiety-and-boost-your-gmat-score/]practice some mindfulness[/url] to get some equilibrium back into your life), then do a full study week next week.

[b]What if this stretches further than that?[/b]
It’s true that it might. Nobody can predict how this is going to play out—and it’s likely to play out in different ways in different locations. I’m a planner by nature, so I fully get the urge to want to have the path all mapped out.

Sometimes, though, it’s good to plan just for what we know right now and to defer decisions that can be deferred. Make your best call now and, once we know what’s actually happening in a few weeks, we’ll adjust as needed. (Feel free to tell me about your situation and ask me for my opinion on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/forums/general-gmat-strategy-questions-f9.html]our forums[/url].)

I’ll repeat something I said earlier. We’re human. We’re going to figure this out. Now go do a GMAT problem and then teach it to your cat, dog, partner / roommate / child, or anyone you can get to listen to you on Facetime.

Good luck and happy studying!

[b]RELATED: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/covid19/]Coronavirus GMAT Accommodations and Updates[/url]

[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/stacey-koprince/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceBioLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog][img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2015/06/stacey-koprince-150x150.png[/img][/url]

[b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/stacey-koprince/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceBioLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog]Stacey Koprince[/url] is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Montreal, Canada and Los Angeles, California.[/b] Stacey has been teaching the GMAT, GRE, and LSAT  for more than 15 years and is one of the most well-known instructors in the industry. Stacey loves to teach and is absolutely fascinated by standardized tests. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceCoursesLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog#instructor/86]Check out Stacey’s upcoming GMAT courses here[/url].

The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/my-gmat-was-cancelled-now-what/]My GMAT Was Cancelled. Now What?[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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My GMAT Was Canceled. Now What?  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Mar 2020, 05:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: My GMAT Was Canceled. Now What?
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/03/mprep-blogimages-wave1-73.png[/img]

As you no doubt know by now, many GMAT testing centers are currently closed as a result of the pandemic. How do you keep getting ready for the GMAT despite not knowing when you’ll actually be able to take it?

I had a class that ended on March 10th; many of my students had already booked their exams and are now finding themselves in the unenviable position of having to extend their studies for a potentially indeterminate length of time. I’ll be sharing with you the same thoughts that I shared with them.

First: We’ll keep our [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/covid19/]blog[/url] and other communication channels updated, but you can also go straight to the source: the [url=https://www.mba.com/articles-and-announcements/announcements/update-on-coronavirus]mba.com website[/url]. Both our page and the official one will keep you up to date on test center closures (and, eventually, reopenings) and any other news that will help you to plan.

[b]I’m really stressed out right now.[/b]
Me, too. Even in the best of times, it’s stressful to get ready for these kinds of exams—and of course you’re even more stressed right now. (It’s also normal to feel like you shouldn’t be stressed out about this when there are much bigger things going on in the world…even though you are still stressed out about it.)

Take a deep breath, as deep as you can. Breathe through your nose (so that it takes a long time) and let it out slowly. Loosen up your clenched abdominal muscles. Your plan has changed, yes, but you can still move forward in general.

I’ll address various scenarios below but first I have a question for you: Do you have more time on your hands right now or less time? If your work or family commitments mean that you have a lot less time to think about the GMAT right now, I’d recommend one of two paths: Postponement or Maintenance Mode.

[b]What’s Postponement?[/b]
Put your GMAT studies 100% on hold until you have the bandwidth to think about this again. Don’t give it a second thought—you have my permission. I’ve already recommended this to one of my students, based on that person’s circumstances.

[b]And what about Maintenance Mode?[/b]
This is for those who are too busy right now but think they will be able to pick back up in a month or so and don’t want to lose the progress they’ve made. Don’t try to learn new material or even improve your existing skills; your goal during these weeks is not to get better. Your goal is simply not to lose skills.

If you choose Maintenance Mode, plan to spend about 3 to 4 hours a week studying. Try a few of each problem type (timed!)—this is a great time to re-do some problems from your error log. Do some skill drills out of Foundations of Math or Foundations of Verbal, as needed. Review flash cards.

One more note: The world has changed and it makes sense to reevaluate your prior decisions in light of that. Think back to whenever you made the decision to study for the GMAT this year. If you’d known then what you know right now, would you still have chosen to take the GMAT now? If the answer is no or probably not, then rip the bandaid off: Skip Maintenance Mode and go straight to Postponement. You can pick things up again later this year or next year.

What if, instead, you have the same time—or even more time—to focus on the GMAT now? Read on.

[b]I was planning to take the exam this summer or fall.[/b]
Carry on. At the moment, you don’t need to worry about planning anything any differently than you would have if you had taken the GMAT last year at this time.

[b]I was going to take the exam in the next month or two. What do I do now?[/b]
You likely fall into one of two broad categories.

[b]Category 1: I think I need more time…[/b]

If you’d already been thinking that you could use more time, then assume you won’t take the exam before May or June and make a plan to lift your score or rededicate yourself to your studies, just as you would have done in normal times. It’s common for people to push back their original test date.

[b]Category 2: I was feeling good; I was almost ready to go…[/b]

If, on the other hand, your score is about in the range that you want and you were almost ready to go, then we have to talk about how to stretch out your studies—even though you don’t know exactly how long you need to take. It’s annoying. But humans have a pretty good track record of adapting. We’ll figure this out.

As of this writing, GMAC’s website is showing some appointments available in later April and in May, depending on location. If you haven’t already booked (or re-booked) your appointment, go ahead and register. (Yes, it’s possible that your new date will have to get pushed out, but it’s still a good idea to have a date to give you something to work toward.)

(Yes, it’s possible that your new date will have to get pushed out, but it’s still a good idea to have a date to give you something to work toward.)

[b]What do I do with the extra time?[/b]
The general study path for everyone is to work at improving your skills (and, therefore, your score) until you get yourself up into your desired scoring range. Then, spend the last 10 to 14 days training to “peak on game day”—like an athlete trying to peak on the day of the gold-medal match.

We’re not going to change that Game Planning period—it’ll still be your last 10 to 14 days. We’re going to add your extra time to the “Lift My Score” period.

Let’s say that you’d originally planned to take the real test in 3 weeks but you’ve rescheduled for 6 weeks from now, so you’ve got an additional 3 weeks of study time. You’ll still reserve your final 2 weeks for game planning, leaving you 4 weeks of primary study time. What do you do with that 4 weeks?

[b]If you are in Category 1 (need more time)[/b]
First, think about why you need more time. If you’ve found that your prior study hasn’t been as effective as you’d like, or you weren’t studying as much as you’d intended, use this as an opportunity to rededicate yourself to your studies. What wasn’t working for you before? What can you do differently in the coming weeks to help yourself work better? Ask friends, fellow students, and teachers for advice as well.

Next, two to four weeks is enough time to do one full Lift My Score cycle. One cycle consists of taking a practice test, analyzing it to categorize your strengths and weaknesses (more below), and then making a 2-3 week study plan based on your analysis.

Start by, [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/resources/how-to-review-your-gmat-practice-exam/]analyzing the data[/url] from your most recent practice test (if it’s been more than 3-4 weeks, you may want to take another) and figure out what your priorities should be right now. Put everything into one of three buckets:

[list]
[*]Bucket 1 Strengths: I’m already good here.[/*]
[*]Bucket 2 Priorities: My “opportunity” weaknesses—they’re not great, but they’re not terrible either. These are my best opportunities to improve.[/*]
[*]Bucket 3 Ignore For Now: My biggest weaknesses—not where I want to spend my time, as long as I still have Bucket 2 stuff I can use to lift my score.[/*]
[/list]
Spend the next few weeks working through Bucket 2 items, then roll into [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/last-14-days-gmat-part-1-building-game-plan/]Game Planning[/url] when the time comes. (There’s the link again so you don’t have to go find it earlier.)

[b]If you are in Category 2 (pretty good to go already)[/b]
If you’ve been studying, say, 12 to 15 hours a week, one option is to cut your time in half—that is, spread that time out over two weeks instead. You can still make real progress in 6 to 8 hours per week.

Alternatively, intersperse some Maintenance Mode weeks with your full study weeks to stretch the time out. So take a Maintenance Mode week this week (and maybe [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/2013/05/09/stressed-out-meditate-to-lower-your-anxiety-and-boost-your-gmat-score/]practice some mindfulness[/url] to get some equilibrium back into your life), then do a full study week next week.

[b]What if this stretches further than that?[/b]
It’s true that it might. Nobody can predict how this is going to play out—and it’s likely to play out in different ways in different locations. I’m a planner by nature, so I fully get the urge to want to have the path all mapped out.

Sometimes, though, it’s good to plan just for what we know right now and to defer decisions that can be deferred. Make your best call now and, once we know what’s actually happening in a few weeks, we’ll adjust as needed. (Feel free to tell me about your situation and ask me for my opinion on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/forums/general-gmat-strategy-questions-f9.html]our forums[/url].)

I’ll repeat something I said earlier. We’re human. We’re going to figure this out. Now go do a GMAT problem and then teach it to your cat, dog, partner / roommate / child, or anyone you can get to listen to you on Facetime.

Good luck and happy studying!

[b]RELATED: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/covid19/]Coronavirus GMAT Accommodations and Updates[/url]

[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/stacey-koprince/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceBioLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog][img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2015/06/stacey-koprince-150x150.png[/img][/url]

[b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/stacey-koprince/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceBioLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog]Stacey Koprince[/url] is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Montreal, Canada and Los Angeles, California.[/b] Stacey has been teaching the GMAT, GRE, and LSAT  for more than 15 years and is one of the most well-known instructors in the industry. Stacey loves to teach and is absolutely fascinated by standardized tests. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceCoursesLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog#instructor/86]Check out Stacey’s upcoming GMAT courses here[/url].

The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/my-gmat-was-cancelled-now-what/]My GMAT Was Canceled. Now What?[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
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My GMAT Was Canceled. Now What?   [#permalink] 24 Mar 2020, 05:00

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