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Common Math Errors on the GMAT  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Nov 2019, 15:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: Common Math Errors on the GMAT
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2019/11/mprep-blogimages-wave1-47-e1574458143860.png[/img]

Do you ever make mistakes on GMAT math that just don’t make sense when you review? That’s not unusual, and in fact, it’s probably one of the most common reasons to miss easy GMAT math problems. Here’s why:

[list]
[*]When you’re under pressure, your memory becomes less reliable. [/*]
[*]Each person will find some things easier to remember than others. [/*]
[/list]

A lot of GMAT math errors are based on memorization. Suppose that you want to simplify the following expression:

0.00004 x 10-3

Quick, which of the following rules is correct?

[list]
[*]To multiply a decimal by ten raised to a negative power, move the decimal place to the right that many times. [/*]
[*]To multiply a decimal by ten raised to a negative power, move the decimal place to the left that many times. [/*]
[/list]
Only one of these rules is right. But look how similar they are! The right one may be obvious to you right now, but the right rule is so close to the wrong rule. Can you really be sure that if you memorize it now, you’ll remember it flawlessly on test day? (By the way, the second rule is the correct one.)

In this article, I’ll list a handful of mistakes that people often make on GMAT math. Then, I’ll share a self-check you can use to avoid each one. Because everyone is different, some of these mistakes may be easy for you to avoid. For others, you might decide to double-check every single time.

[b]1. Decimals and exponents[/b]
Let’s go back to the example above.

0.00004 x 10-3

Instead of memorizing which way to move the decimal, [b]think about whether the decimal’s value should become larger or smaller. [/b]

Ten raised to a negative power, like 10-3, is a fraction. In this case, it’s equal to 1/1,000. Multiplying something by a small fraction will definitely make it smaller.

A small decimal has more zeroes in front of it. So, to simplify this expression, you want to add more zeroes in front of the 4.

To remember how many zeroes to add, think about dividing by 10. Each time you divide a decimal by 10, you’d add in one zero. Dividing by 103, which is what we’re doing in this problem, is the same as dividing by 10 three times. So, you need to add three zeroes.

The right answer is 0.00000004.

[b]2. Decimals and percents[/b]
When you want to find 0.05% of 13,000, what do you multiply 13,000 by? It’s easy to lose a decimal place or two and end up with an answer that’s off by a factor of 10.

Here’s the solution. [b]The literal meaning of the percent symbol is “/100”[/b]. In fact, the percent symbol sort of looks like a division sign with two zeroes, symbolizing a 100. Any time you see a math expression including a percent, write it on your paper as if the percent sign said “/100” instead.

For this question, you’d write the following on your paper:

0.05/100 x 13,000

This simplifies to 0.05 x 130, or 6.5.

You can use this trick even when there are variables involved in the expression. For instance, a question might ask you “If y% of x equals 50, what is x% of y?”

Write this as follows:

(y/100)(x) = 50

(x/100)(y) = ?

In both cases, the left side of the expression simplifies to xy/100. So, they’re equal, and the answer to the question is 50.

3. [b]Variables in fractions[/b]
Simplifying a fraction that only includes numbers is relatively straightforward, although the math might be tedious. But, when the fraction includes variables, the math gets less obvious.

Here’s an example of something you might have on your paper while doing a GMAT math problem:

(x + 7y) / (y²)

You may have memorized a rule that says “you can cancel common terms from the top and bottom of a fraction.” But that rule comes with some fiddly little caveats, like the fact that you aren’t allowed to do this:

(x + 7y) / (y²)

(x + 7) / (y)

Here’s another way to think about it that’s more reliable. [b]Factor out the same value from both the top and the bottom of the fraction[/b]. Then, you can “cancel” (divide) both of those terms.

In the example above, you can’t factor a y out of the top of the fraction. So, you aren’t allowed to cancel the y.

But, in this example, you can:

(y³ + 7y) / (y²)

y(y² + 7) / y(y)

(y² + 7) / y

If you’ve made this mistake before, commit yourself to thinking each time: [b]what am I factoring out of the top and bottom of this fraction?[/b] If you can’t factor it out, you don’t get to divide by it!

4. [b]Properties of 0[/b]
There are two common Number Properties rules in GMAT math that relate to the number 0. Unfortunately, they’re almost identical to each other, and it’s so easy to get them switched around!

[list]
[*]Zero is NOT positive or negative, it’s neither.[/*]
[*]Zero is EVEN, not odd. [/*]
[/list]
Let’s dig into why this is the case.

All even numbers have one thing in common: if you divide them by 2, you don’t end up with a fraction or a remainder. For instance, 2,476 is even, because if you divide it by 2, you get a round number with nothing left over. The same is true of, say, -18. This rule of thumb will always accurately tell you whether a number is even.

What happens when you divide zero by two? You get zero.

0/2 = 0

Sure enough, there’s no fraction or remainder. So, by our rules, zero is definitely even.

Why isn’t zero positive or negative? This is a trickier one, because it depends, in part, on language. In some languages other than English, zero is actually said to be both positive and negative. However, on the GMAT, it’s neither.

On the GMAT, a good general strategy is to visualize a number line. Numbers to the left are smaller than numbers to the right. Anything to the left of zero is negative, and anything to the right of zero is positive. And because zero itself is neither to the left nor to the right of zero, it can’t be positive or negative.

5. [b]Dividing by variables[/b]
How do you solve this equation?

3x = x²

The obvious first move is to divide both sides by x, giving you this answer:

3 = x

But, that’s actually a big problem. Why? Because x doesn’t necessarily equal 3. In fact, x could also equal 0. (Plug 0 into the equation 3x = x², and it works out just fine!)

You could memorize a rule: “equations that have the same variable in every term also have 0 as a solution, on top of whatever solution you come up with.” But, here are two alternatives.

[list]
[*][b]Solve a quadratic like a quadratic[/b][/*]
[*][b]Don’t divide by 0[/b][/*]
[/list]
For the first alternative, notice that 3x = x² is a quadratic equation: it has a squared variable in it. The way to solve a quadratic isn’t to divide out like terms! Instead, you move everything to the same side, and then factor. So, do this:

x² – 3x = 0

x(x – 3) = 0

This gives you two solutions: x = 0, and x = 3.

The other alternative is to be extra careful never to divide anything by zero. That includes variables! If a variable might equal zero, then you still can’t divide by it. After all, you might be dividing by zero without realizing it.

The right approach is the same one as shown above: instead of dividing out an x (don’t do it, since it might equal zero!), focus on factoring it out without dividing. To do that, put both terms on the same side of the equation, then factor out the x that they have in common.

6. [b]Dividing by variables, with a twist[/b]
There’s one other situation where it’s dangerous to divide by a variable: when you’re simplifying an inequality. This causes even bigger problems than the ones shown above.

For example, suppose you’re trying to simplify this inequality:

3x

If you just divide by x, you get this:

3

That’s perfect, except that it’s the wrong answer. x definitely doesn’t have to be bigger than 3! For instance, x could be -1:

3(-1) = -3

(-1)2 = 1

-3

You may already know a rule about dividing inequalities: [b]if you divide or multiply an inequality by a negative number, you have to flip the sign[/b]. That causes more problems when you’re dividing or multiplying by a variable. You don’t know the value of the variable, so you don’t know whether it’s negative or not! So, maybe you have to flip the sign, or maybe you don’t. There’s no way to tell. That’s the issue.

The solution is to [b]never divide an inequality by a number unless you know for sure whether it’s positive or negative. [/b]If you know that x is positive, you can go ahead and do the division above. If you know that x is negative, you can still do the division, you just have to flip the sign! But if you aren’t sure, you can’t divide by x.

What can you do instead? It depends on what the overall GMAT problem looks like. On problems like these, it’s often possible to solve more quickly and easily by testing numbers. Or, you can do something similar to the approach from the previous tip:

3x

0  – 3x

In other words, x² – 3x is positive. Therefore, x(x-3) is positive.

Next, use some Number Properties facts. The product of x and x-3 is only positive if x and x-3 are both positive, or x and x-3 are both negative. That will happen in exactly two situations. If x is greater than 3, then x and x-3 are both positive, so their product is positive. Or, if x is less than 0, then x and x-3 are both negative, so their product is positive.

So, the correct answer is this:

x 3

[b]7. Negative variables[/b]
This conversation about positive and negative numbers leads us to our final tip. Quick: is the following number positive or negative?

-x

Especially in Number Properties problems, which often ask you whether a value is positive or negative, this can trip you up. It’s easy to see the negative sign when you’re working fast and assume that you definitely have a negative number. After all, -2 is negative, so why not -x?

However, that’s only true if x itself is positive. If x is negative, then the number above is actually positive. For instance, if x = -5, then -x = 5.

To avoid mistakes, [b]imagine putting individual variables inside of parentheses[/b]. -x is really -(x). Therefore, if x = -5, then -x = -(x) = -(-5) = 5. After all, two negatives make a positive.

This can also help you remember what to do when you raise a variable to a power. x² really equals (x)², so if x = -5, then x² = (-5)² = 25. Just don’t accidentally include anything else inside of the parentheses! If you do this, you’ll be able to simplify expressions including negative variables correctly.

[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b][b]

[/b][b][/b]

[b][b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/chelsey-cooley/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgre%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=CooleyBioGREBlog&utm_campaign=GRE%20Blog][img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gre/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2015/11/chelsey-cooley-150x150.jpg[/img][/url]
 is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Seattle, Washington.[/b] [/b]Chelsey always followed her heart when it came to her education. Luckily, her heart led her straight to the perfect background for GMAT and GRE teaching: she has undergraduate degrees in mathematics and history, a master’s degree in linguistics, a 790 on the GMAT, and a perfect 170Q/170V on the GRE. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/#instructor/336]Check out Chelsey’s upcoming GMAT prep offerings here[/url].

The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/common-math-errors-on-the-gmat/]Common Math Errors on the GMAT[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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User avatar
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Quick GMAT Math Hacks  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2019, 15:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: Quick GMAT Math Hacks
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2019/12/mprep-blogimages-wave1-39-e1575494245444.png[/img]

Here are a few of the most useful quick GMAT math tricks I’ve learned over the years. They won’t show up on every problem, or even on every Quant section. But, if you happen to use one of these GMAT math hacks on test day, it could save you anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes.

[b]Number Properties[/b]
[list]
[*]The product of two consecutive integers is always divisible by two, the product of three consecutive integers is always divisible by three, and so on. [/*]
[*]To check whether a complicated expression is even or odd, plug in 0 and 1. For instance, try the expression 2x3 + x2 + x. If you plug in 0, you get 0, which is even. If you plug in 1, you get 4, which is also even. So, this expression is always even. [/*]
[*]If you want to find all of the factors of a number by guessing and testing, you can stop when you reach the square root of that number. For instance, if you’re finding all of the factors of 228, you can stop checking numbers when you hit 15, since that’s approximately the square root of 228. [/*]
[/list]
[b]Geometry[/b]
[list]
[*]If you double the side length of a shape (such as a square or triangle), its area quadruples. If you halve the side length, its area is quartered. [/*]
[*]Learn the [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gre/blog/gre-geometry-three-ways-to-spot-similar-triangles/]three ways to spot similar triangles[/url], so you’ll instantly recognize that two triangles are similar without having to prove it from scratch. [/*]
[*]If a problem tells you a shape is a rectangle, don’t forget that the shape could be a square! In fact, a square is often a good case to test on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-review-a-data-sufficiency-question/]Geometry Data Sufficiency[/url] problems. [/*]
[*]If a GMAT math problem asks you whether a point is on a line, plug the coordinates of the point into the equation for the line. If you get a valid result, then the point is on the line. For example, the point (2, 6) is on the line y = 2x + 2.[/*]
[/list]
[b]Word Problems[/b]
[list]
[*]The average of a set of numbers always has to be somewhere in the middle of that set. It can’t be larger than the largest number in the set, or smaller than the smallest number. This is useful for weighted average problems: if you average the weights of 6 cats that each weigh 10 pounds, and 8 dogs that each weigh 30 pounds, the result will be somewhere in the middle in between 10 and 30. The more evenly spread the numbers are, the closer the average will actually be to the middle. [/*]
[*]Only use a Venn diagram for rare “3-group” overlapping set problems. For almost all overlapping sets, the Overlapping Set Matrix is quicker and easier. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-handle-3-group-overlapping-sets-on-the-gmat/]Both are described in this article[/url]. [/*]
[*]You’ll sometimes see rates problems that look like this: if it takes four people twelve days to sew eight jackets, how long does it take ten people to sew ten jackets? A quick trick for approaching these is to start with the original statement, and then “scale” it upwards or downwards. Here’s what that might look like: [/*]
[/list]
It takes 4 people 12 days to sew 8 jackets.

1 person will take 4 times as long to do the same amount of work, so it will take 1 person 48 days to sew 8 jackets.

If that 1 person sews ⅛ as many jackets, it will take ⅛ as many days. So, it takes 1 person 6 days to sew 1 jacket.

If a person takes 6 days to sew a jacket, then it will take 10 people 6 days to sew 10 jackets (one per person). The answer is 6.

[b]Fractions, Decimals, and Percents[/b]
[list]
[*]When a fraction has zeroes on the end of both the numerator and the denominator, chop off the same number of zeroes from each (just make sure you count carefully!). 1,000,000 / 5,000 simplifies to 1,000 / 5. [/*]
[*]Likewise, if a fraction has decimals in both the numerator and denominator, you can simplify by moving both decimal places by the same amount and in the same direction. For instance, 0.0007 / 0.14 = 0.007 / 1.4 = 0.07 / 14 = 0.7 / 140 = 7 / 1,400. [/*]
[*]Use [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gre/blog/heres-the-safest-way-to-handle-gre-percentage-problems/]this technique to directly translate percent problems from English into math[/url] without having to convert between decimals and percents. [/*]
[/list]
[b]Working with Numbers[/b]
[list]
[*]You can use a similar ‘scaling’ technique to calculate percents, fractions, or decimals. For instance, if you want to find 0.1% of 50,000, start like this: [/*]
[/list]
10% of 50,000 is 5,000.

So, 1% of 50,000 is a tenth of 5,000, or 500.

So, 0.1% of 50,000 is a tenth of 500, or 50. The answer is 50.

[list]
[*]To quickly divide a number by 5, divide it by 10 first, then multiply by 2. For example, 1,880/5 = 1,880/10 * 2 = 188 * 2 = 376. [/*]
[*]Arithmetic can be easier if you “split up” or rearrange the numbers before you do the math. Suppose that you need to calculate 117 – 98. Rewrite this as 117 – 100 + 2, or 17 + 2, which equals 19. [/*]
[*]Use a similar technique to quickly calculate the square of a number that’s close to an easy value.[/*]
[/list]
79² = (80 – 1)² = 80² – 2(80) + 1 = 6,400 – 160 + 1 = 6241

[list]
[*]To find a good common denominator, think of a value (if there is one) that both numbers are divisible by. Divide [b]one[/b] of the two numbers by that value. Then, multiply that by the other number.
[list]
[*]For example, to find a common denominator between 25 and 15, note that both are divisible by 5. So, divide 25 by 5, which gives you 5, then multiply that by 15, giving you 75. 75 would be a good common denominator.[/*]
[/list]
[/*]
[*]It can be useful to memorize the approximate square roots of 2 and 3: √2≈1.4 and√3≈1.7. To remember this, at least if you’re in the US, think of two dates: Valentine’s Day is on 2/14 and St. Patrick’s Day is on 3/17. [/*]
[*]To estimate other square roots, think of a perfect square that’s as close as possible to the value you’re dealing with. (You have your perfect squares memorized, right…?) Estimate based on that—so, for instance, √79 is a bit smaller than √81, which equals 9. [/*]
[/list]
[b]What Next?[/b]
Math isn’t the most important part of the GMAT math section! [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/what-the-gmat-really-tests/]Strong executive reasoning skills trump math knowledge[/url]. So, while these tips and tricks are useful, if you’re having a tough time with the math section, incorporate some work on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/everything-know-gmat-time-management-part-3/]timing[/url], [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/which-gmat-problems-should-i-guess-on-part-3-making-great-guesses-on-quant-problems/]guessing[/url], [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/the-4-math-strategies-everyone-must-master-part-1/]problem-solving strategies[/url], and [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-handle-gmat-stress-without-freaking-out/]stress management[/url]. But keep some pages in your notes for these GMAT math tricks, plus any others you may come across while studying: you never know what may turn out to be useful.

[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b][b]

[/b][b][/b]

[b][b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/chelsey-cooley/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgre%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=CooleyBioGREBlog&utm_campaign=GRE%20Blog][img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gre/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2015/11/chelsey-cooley-150x150.jpg[/img][/url]
 is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Seattle, Washington.[/b] [/b]Chelsey always followed her heart when it came to her education. Luckily, her heart led her straight to the perfect background for GMAT and GRE teaching: she has undergraduate degrees in mathematics and history, a master’s degree in linguistics, a 790 on the GMAT, and a perfect 170Q/170V on the GRE. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/#instructor/336]Check out Chelsey’s upcoming GMAT prep offerings here[/url].

The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/quick-gmat-math-hacks/]Quick GMAT Math Hacks[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
http://manhattangmat.com
Manhattan GMAT Online Marketing Associate
User avatar
Joined: 14 Nov 2013
Posts: 219
GMAT Rate Problems  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Dec 2019, 22:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: GMAT Rate Problems
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2019/12/mprep-blogimages-wave1-38-e1575692689864.png[/img]

If this post is 1500 words long, and you can process 120 words per minute, then how long will it take you to read this whole post? If you could read 20% faster, then what effect would that have on how long it takes you to read the whole thing? If I were adding 80 words per minute to the blog post, then how long (at your original speed) would it take for you to reach the end?

Those questions were a taste of the often daunting world of GMAT Rate problems. Before we get any deeper, we should acknowledge that Rate problems do not seem to be tested as frequently on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/list-gmat-quant-content/]GMAT Quant[/url] nowadays as they once were. So while you’ll see plenty of Rate problems in the Official Guides and on Manhattan Prep’s practice GMATs ([url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/free-gmat-practice-test/]take a free one[/url]), you might not see many or any of these on your real GMAT.

Nevertheless, Rate problems are one of the most common requests I get from tutoring students. Because these problems usually come in [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/gmat-word-problems-equations/]Word Problem format[/url] and take on many different flavors, students frequently feel like there is too much density or variety for them to handle. Indeed, there are a variety of moves we might employ, and a variety of formulas/relationships that would be useful to know, depending on the situation. Let’s discuss.

[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat#formulas][b]Useful Formulas [/b][/url]onto flashcards until they’re 2nd nature.[/*]
[*]The biggest thing that helps me is [b]Making Up My Own Number [/b]for Distance or Work, when one isn’t provided.[/*]
[*]To get some harder questions correct, you may find that [b]Scaling Up Ratios [/b]or [b]Reciprocal Thinking [/b]is the easiest way to arrive at the answer.[/*]
[*]It can pay to develop some chops at [b]Approximating[/b], especially since some of these problems might be good contenders for skipping.[/*]
[/list]

[b]You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/][b]Check out our upcoming courses here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[b][img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2018/03/patrick-tyrell-150x150.png[/img][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/patrick-tyrrell/]Patrick Tyrrell[/url] is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Los Angeles, California.[/b] He has a B.A. in philosophy, a 780 on the GMAT, and relentless enthusiasm for his work. In addition to teaching test prep since 2006, he’s also an avid songwriter/musician. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/#instructor/270]Check out Patrick’s upcoming GMAT courses here![/url]



The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/gmat-rate-problems/]GMAT Rate Problems[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________
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Manhattan GMAT Online Marketing Associate
User avatar
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GMAT Data Sufficiency: Get 5 Extra Minutes  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Dec 2019, 08:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: GMAT Data Sufficiency: Get 5 Extra Minutes
Image

What if I told you that you could have five extra minutes on the quantitative section of the GMAT? Would you be interested?

Good, because this is going to get a little technical. I’m also going to assume you’ve had some experience with Data Sufficiency problems on the GMAT Math section. You should also have practiced testing cases to solve these problems: here’s a good introduction to that strategy in case you’re unfamiliar.

Part 1: Practical Application
Now, to save yourself the five minutes I promised, you have to understand something I’m naming the Moliski Theorem. Though I’ve heard it discussed by several people, I’m naming it after my colleague Liz Moliski, who was the first person I saw actually float this idea while teaching a class. The theorem applies to any Data Sufficiency question that has a yes/no answer. For example, the theorem is applicable to this Data Sufficiency question:

Did Rocky the dog eat more dog treats this year than he did last year?

It is not, however, applicable to this question, since the question asks for a specific value:

How many dog treats did Rocky the dog eat this year?

Here’s the Moliski theorem, put simply: Attempt to find one concrete example of the statement where the answer to the question is “no.” If you can find such an example, the statement is not sufficient. If you can’t find such an example, the statement is sufficient.

That’s it! Is your mind blown yet? Cause mine is.

You see, up until I saw Liz teach, I’d always assumed you needed two concrete examples of the statement that got you two different answers to the question in order to show that the statement is not sufficient. Defining those examples was time-consuming. The Moliski theorem not only obviates the need for the second example, it also makes it extremely simple to define the single example you’re looking for. Since I now only need to define and find half the examples than I did before, I have been able to solve Data Sufficiency problems in half the time that it took me previously, going from two minutes (on average) down to one. I have seen at least five yes/no Data Sufficiency questions on each of my practice tests, meaning this idea has bought me at least five full minutes of extra time.

I’m going to show you a Data Sufficiency problem. Try to solve it on your own first. Then we’ll apply the Moliski theorem.

If x and y are integers, is the product xy even?

  • x – y
  • x + y is odd
Remember, the Moliski theorem says we should attempt to find examples where the answer to the question is “no.” In this case, that means we don’t actually want the product xy to be even; we want that product to be odd.

Now let’s find our examples. Can I find an example of statement (1), which says x – y xy is odd? Sure I can: 7 and 5, for example. 7 – 5 is 2, that’s less than 3. The product 7 · 5 is 35, which is odd. Statement (1) is therefore not sufficient.

Moving on to statement (2): I want to find numbers where x + y is odd, and also where the product xy is odd. Well that’s impossible, since if x + y is odd, then one or the other must be even, meaning when I multiply them together, there’s no way I’ll ever get an odd number. Since I couldn’t find my example, statement (2) is sufficient. Now we know that the correct answer is (B).

Are you excited yet? Try this super-tough problem:

Is x > 0?

  • x² 
  • x³ > x
The Moliski theorem tells us we don’t want x to be greater than 0; we want it to be less than 0. In other words, we want x to be negative.

Try to find a negative number x that would make statement (1) true. So, I know that x2 x be negative? Sure, as long as it’s a negative fraction like –12. Statement (1) is not sufficient.

Now try to find a negative number for x that would make statement (2) true. If x3 > x, can x be negative? There’s no reason to reinvent the wheel, let’s just use x = –12 again. If you cube that, it’s greater than what you started with. So statement (2) is also not sufficient.

And oh, by the way, since –12 is an example that satisfies both statements, and gives us the “no” answer we’re looking for, the correct answer to this question is (E).

LET’S GOOOOOOO

Part 2: A Small Caveat and Other Non-Essential Nerdy Stuff That You Can Read If You’re Interested, but I’m Mostly Writing It Because I Don’t Want Liz to Get in Trouble

Occasionally, the Moliski theorem fails. Here’s an example:

Is x > 10?

  • x
  • x² 
Both of these statements are sufficient on their own to answer the question, so the correct answer is (D), but the Moliski theorem would lead you to decide they are not (and would therefore lead you to incorrect answer (E)). These statements are each sufficient because the answer to the question is always “no,” meaning they technically do provide us enough information to answer that question. Liz mentioned this possibility in her class, noting that if you want to be thorough and precise, you should find a “yes” case after you’ve found a “no” case.

Don’t, however, let the rain fall on your parade quite yet. The “always no” situation is exceedingly rare; in my professional experience, it shows up on roughly 1% of all Data Sufficiency questions (probably even fewer, to be honest). So, we are still looking at a strategy that works 99+% of the time and saves you 5+ minutes: personally, I’m willing to accept that risk.

Finally, here’s what I think is the true genius of the Moliski theorem: It sidesteps the single most common error I see my students make when tackling Data Sufficiency problems, which is to misinterpret the question as a rule. By explicitly hunting for a “no” answer, the Moliski theorem forces you to consider that negative possibility right upfront, so that you don’t have to remember to look for it later when you’re already knee-deep in a fog of calculations and algebra.

Epilogue
When I first started teaching the GMAT, I never dreamed I’d see a day when I could get away with testing just one case per Data Sufficiency statement as opposed to two. Now that day is upon us. I hope your life is as changed as mine.

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. Check out our upcoming courses here.

ImageRyan Jacobs is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in San Francisco, California. He has an MBA from UC San Diego, a 780 on the GMAT, and years of GMAT teaching experience. His other interests include music, photography, and hockey. Check out Ryan’s upcoming GMAT prep offerings here.

The post GMAT Data Sufficiency: Get 5 Extra Minutes appeared first on GMAT.
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How to Succeed in Business School  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jan 2020, 08:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: How to Succeed in Business School
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Your business school wants you to have a successful career. There’s one cynical reason and one neutral reason why: the cynical one is that if you do have a successful career, you will tell everyone you know that you went to, say, the Rady School of Management, and then those people will then want to send their application fees, and ultimately their tuition checks, to said institution, and if you have a really successful career, you may even get in touch with your philanthropic side and get a building named after you at your alma mater. The neutral one is that business schools exist to help you grow the national economy, and your success is the school’s (and ultimately the nation’s) success. Whatever your personal outlook is on the matter, your business school does want you to succeed, and knowing that can help you in a few ways.

How to Succeed in Business School: The Application
Let’s start with the application process. One of the best tools business schools have at their disposal for ensuring their students succeed after graduation is the ability to select students whom they believe will succeed. This seems like an obvious point, but it completely explains the Olympic athlete with a GMAT score that’s 100 points lower than yours in the chair next to you when you go to do campus visits. I don’t care if she doesn’t know how many factors 441 has, that young woman can do a gainer with two and a half somersaults like nobody’s business, and more to the point, she had to work for years with single-minded focus towards a goal that very few people ever achieve. I think she’s sufficiently demonstrated the skills to succeed in the workforce; wouldn’t you agree? Now, you may not be an Olympic athlete, but you have certainly persevered through adversity before. You may have gotten a promotion at your job, or even been charged with leading a new team at your company. You have done something in your life that will show an admissions committee that you will be successful in your career; your best bet is to figure out what that is and highlight it.

How to Succeed in Business School: Once You’re In
Once you’re done with your applications, you’ve been accepted, and you arrive on campus, your school will be there to support you. At most schools, you’ll be placed in a study group of around 4 or 5 students, and you’ll turn in all your homework as a group; your school is trying to prepare you to work with diverse teams. You’ll take a core curriculum for a large part of your first year; your school wants you to have a basic understanding of accounting, operations, economics, marketing, finance, and organizational strategy. A criticism I’ve read of business schools is that classes are not as academically rigorous as they would be in other graduate-level programs, but I think that criticism might be somewhat beside the point since business school serves a slightly different purpose: you should go to your classes not necessarily because you want to become an expert in one particular subject, but rather you should go because you will learn the language of business, and you will gain insights that will help you better manage your team or organization down the road. You’ll also have access to school clubs, trips, networking events—you name it. Again, all of this is intended to give you a leg up in your career.

Takeaways
Here’s the point: your school wants you to succeed, and the way to do that is:

  • (a) take advantage of the professional skills and network you currently have, 
  • (b) spend your time in school gaining the skills you weren’t able to gain outside of school and meeting the people you weren’t able to meet outside of school until 
  • (c) you put all of these skills and people together and launch the career you want. 
If you filter the choices you make about how to spend your time through that lens, then you won’t regret missing out on other opportunities, since you’ll know that you’re spending your time wisely.

KEEP READING: Is the MBA Worth It? Go Beyond ROI.

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. Check out our upcoming courses here.

ImageRyan Jacobs is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in San Francisco, California. He has an MBA from UC San Diego, a 780 on the GMAT, and years of GMAT teaching experience. His other interests include music, photography, and hockey. Check out Ryan’s upcoming GMAT prep offerings here.

The post How to Succeed in Business School appeared first on GMAT.
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Inference Questions: The Black Sheep of the GMAT Critical Reasoning Fa  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jan 2020, 09:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: Inference Questions: The Black Sheep of the GMAT Critical Reasoning Family
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A quick note: this is a pretty deep dive into a single GMAT Critical Reasoning question type. If you’re just beginning to learn CR strategy, check out The GMAT Critical Reasoning Mindset or How to Master Every GMAT Critical Reasoning Question TypeInference questions are not super common on GMAT Critical Reasoning, usually only accounting for 1 of your 10 CR questions. However, it tends to be a question type that students miss more frequently, in both CR and Reading Comprehension. Some of this stems from the inherent difficulty, but much of it can result from students’ possessing an incorrect or incomplete sense of what they’re supposed to be doing on these problems.

There are seven main question types in Critical Reasoning: Explain Discrepancy, Role of Bold, Strengthen, Weaken, Evaluate, Assumption, and Inference.

Inference question types are pretty unique. Unlike Assumption, Evaluate, Strengthen, Weaken, and Role of Bold, Inference questions are not based on arguments. And unlike Assumption, Evaluate, Strengthen, Weaken, and Explain Discrepancy, Inference questions are not usually about presenting your brain with some form of cognitive dissonance.

RELATED: Top 10 Tips for GMAT Critical Reasoning

How to Learn GMAT Critical Reasoning
In addition to learning the patterns surrounding analyzing Plans, Predictions, and Causal Explanations, we should also be learning a little index card’s worth of technique for each of these seven main question types.

For each question type, we’re trying to memorize the following:

  • What keywords in the question stem tell me it’s this type of question?
  • What am I reading for in the paragraph?
  • How, and to what extent, should I pre-phrase a potential correct answer?
  • Are there any tendencies relating to the paragraph or the answer choices?

So let’s make sure everyone has a great index card for Inference questions.

What Keywords in the Question Stem Tell Me It’s an Inference Question?
Here are a few examples of Inference question stem wording:

– If the statements above are true, which of the following must be true?

– If the information above is correct, which of the following is most strongly supported?

– The claims above most strongly support which of the following assertions?

– Which of the following can be properly inferred from the passage?

One of the most salient features is the noun being used to describe the paragraph we read. Remember, when we’re doing Strengthen, Weaken, Evaluate, and Assumption, we’re going to almost always see the paragraph described as one of the following: argument, plan, prediction, or hypothesis. Those nouns connote the idea that there will be an opinion within the paragraph:

Arguments have an opinionated conclusion, based on some (untouchable) evidence.

Plans have the opinion that if we follow this plan, we will achieve the stated goal.

Predictions contain a conclusion that is in the future tense, thus an opinion.

Hypothesis means that our author will be opining some ‘causal explanation’ for a curious fact.

With Inference, you see that the nouns being used connote that we’re just reading some facts: statements, information, claims, or passage



Inference may be asked in the “must be true / properly inferred” style (indicating 100% provability), or they may be asked in the “most strongly supported” style (indicating that the correct answer is the most provable claim, even if not 100% provable).

Students often confuse “most strongly support” Inference question stems with a Strengthen question stem.

INFERENCE:   The statements above most strongly support which of the following conclusions?

STRENGTHEN: Which of the following, if true, most strongly supports the argument?

The two big differences are that Inference deals with statements/information, while Strengthen deals with arguments/plans/hypotheses, and that in Inference questions the paragraph provides support for the correct answer choice, while in Strengthen questions the correct answer choice provides support for the paragraph.

Now you tell me, how do you tell the difference between an alligator and a crocodile? Or better yet, one of my favorite SNL premises ever, how do you tell the difference between Dylan McDermott and Dermot Mulroney?

What am I Reading For on an Inference Question?
Here’s the real reason for the season. I wanted to write this blog because any time I’ve asked students this question, I’ve always gotten blank faces or wrong answers. People are tempted to say something like, “The conclusion and premise?”, “the assumption?”, “the gap?”

These answers indicate that students are still in default Critical Reasoning mode, thinking that they’re about to read another argument or plan. Remember, Inference is specifically not giving us arguments and plans. We’re just getting two or more facts and being asked which answer is derivable from those facts.

To draw a valid inference = to draw a valid conclusion. Validity means that we can derive an idea from the available evidence without speculation or exaggeration.

In Reading Comp, correct answers to Inference questions usually paraphrase something we know from the passage, but they use new and unexpected wording or some sort of inverted syntax. Pretend that in line 20 of an RC passage we are told that “George Washington wore a military cap to his Inauguration as the first President of the U.S.”

Can we infer that

(A) He wore the cap because it was a cold January day.

(B) All former generals have to wear military caps.

(C) He thought it flattered his deep blue eyes.

Of course not. None of those are provable claims. They are speculations or overstatements.

We can infer weird restatements such as these:

(A) Not all Presidents are sworn in hatless.

(B) On the first day of the American Presidency, at least some parts of the first President’s scalp were not visible.

(C) People seeing George Washington for the first time at his Inauguration could not have conclusively determined Washington’s level of baldness.

The personality of CR Inference questions is a little different: the correct answer almost always pulls together two or more facts provided.

Pretend we read a CR Inference paragraph that said, “George Washington wore a military cap to his Inauguration as the first President of the U.S. He wore this same cap during the Battle of Yorktown.”

Can we think of a safely worded claim that pulls information from both sentences?

A) Presidents do not always begin their terms wearing totally new garments.

“Presidents begin their terms” pulls info from the first sentence. “Not wearing totally new garments” comes from knowing that the cap he wore on Inauguration day had been worn before at the Battle of Yorktown.

So, in summary, what are we reading for when we read an Inference paragraph? We are reading for two or more facts that could be synthesized in order to derive a true claim.

Very often, this synthesis comes about because the two or more facts contain some overlapping piece of information (in this case, both facts referenced GW’s hat). There are four main types of Inferences, which I will detail a little later:

1. Math-y

2. Apply a Rule

3. Causal

4. Straddle the Pivot

How, and to What Extent, Should I Pre-phrase a Potential Correct Answer on Inference?
We are reading to see if we can combine two or more of the provided facts to derive some true claim (or incredibly likely claim, if we’re doing “most supported”). When we successfully find an available inference we can make from the paragraph, we should certainly anticipate that the correct answer will probably reinforce or reward that.

But we should stay very flexible. Ultimately, the only standard of right or wrong on Inference is, “Could you prove this answer choice, using only the information provided in the paragraph?”

So the correct answer is under no obligation to tie everything together or to present the ‘coolest’ takeaway. The correct answer just has to be the most provable claim. Keep any inference you discovered in your mind as your mantra of what the correct answer will probably sound like, but give each answer choice a fair hearing by asking, “Could I prove this, using the statements I just read?”

What will frequently happen with correct answers is that they will be a spin-off inference of what we inferred. For example, if we inferred “Spain outscored France in the first half”, the correct answer might say “Spain scored at least once in the first half”. If we inferred “the cost of paying for parking was more than the combined costs of taking the train and taking a Lyft from there”, the correct answer might say “The Lyft ride was cheaper than the cost of paying for parking”.

Those answers can feel annoying, because we’re like, “Yes, but I know even more than that!” It doesn’t matter. You can sign off on the truth of those answers, so they are correct. In general, expect that when you walk out of your real GMAT, you’ll reflect on all the stuff you studied that you never even saw on your test and feel like, “Yes, but I know even more than that!”

“Why did I spend a week working on Combinatorics, only to have ZERO combinatorics questions on my exam!”

“Sir, I’m just a janitor at the Pearson testing center. I’m not sure why you’re screaming at me.”

Are There Any Tendencies Relating to the Paragraph or the Answer Choices?

As I hinted before, there are four main types of Inferences, so we can learn to read the paragraph while seeing if we pick up on the scent of any of these.

  • Math-y Inferences
    • Spain beat France in regulation. However, France scored more goals in the 2nd half.

      Infer: Spain scored more in the 1st half / Spain’s margin of victory in the 1st half was larger than France’s margin of victory in the 2nd half
    • My rent is scheduled to increase next month. Nonetheless, it will represent the same proportion of my income.

      Infer: My income is also going to be higher next month (increasing by the same multiplier)

  • Apply a Rule Inferences
    • For a grilled cheese to be delicious, the cheese must be melted into liquid form and the bread must be toasted but not burned. The cheese Patrick is using to make grilled cheeses for his wedding feast is so cold and dense that liquefying it will take at least five minutes of high heat, which is more than enough time to burn the bread he’s using.

      Infer: At least one item at Patrick’s wedding feast will not be delicious.

      (many different ways we could state the inference, but applying the rule to my specific situation tells us that these will not be delicious grilled cheeses)

  • Causal Inferences
    • Patrick always buys his shampoo at CVS. Recently, CVS stopped offering Herbal Essences shampoo. As a direct result, the cost of Patrick’s hair care went up.

      Infer: Patrick was previously buying Herbal Essences. He is now buying a different shampoo, and that new shampoo costs more.

  • Straddle the Pivot Inferences
    • Patrick is a mean teacher. However, he gives his students candy.

      Infer: Not all candy-giving teachers are nice.
    • People think that New York City is the most expensive city in the country. Yet, the cost per square foot of real estate in San Francisco is much higher than that in New York City.

      Infer: New York City is not necessarily the most expensive city in the country.
Math-y and Rule-based inferences tend to feel more like Must Be True. Causal and Straddle the Pivot tend to go more with Most Strongly Supported.

What About Answer Choice Tendencies?
Since we are trying to find the most provable claim, this is a question type for which strong or new language in the answer choices should be a big red flag.

There are three big categories of strength of language:

CERTAIN: all, only, never, unless, requires, must

MORE THAN 50%:  most, typically, generally, usually, likely, tends to, probably

AT LEAST ONE:  some, sometimes, can, may, might, not all, not always, need not

When you’re doing Reading Comp, Assumption, or Inference, you should always consider the two stronger levels of language to be red flags; this doesn’t mean they’re automatically wrong, but it means you have to research in the passage whether you’re justified in saying something this strong.

Meanwhile, when you’re doing Strengthen, Weaken, or Explain Discrepancy, all of which begin with the words “Which of the following, if true, most …”, then the weakest level of language is a red flag. An answer choice isn’t going to have much impact if it’s only saying “at least in one case this is true”.

Inference Questions: Takeaways
In summary, if we want to improve at Inference questions on RC and CR, we need to remember that we’re not allowed to speculate or exaggerate. We’re only allowed to pick answers we feel like we can derive from the provided information. If nothing is 100% provable, then pick the most provable option. If you need to guess quickly, avoid strong language.

For CR, you can go one layer farther and proactively read the paragraph looking for facts that can be combined. In particular, if you see quantified wording, look for a math-y inference. If you see causal wording (e.g., “because of this”, “due to”, “this allows”, “this makes possible), look for a causal inference. If you see a Rule (e.g., “if/then”, “always”, “only”, “ensures”, “requires”, “guarantees”), look for an inference you can make by applying that rule to a specific situation. If you see the paragraph is divided up by a but / yet / however, think about what safely worded claim you could create that would integrate both sides of that pivot.

And if you’d like to submit an entry into a drawing contest I’m sponsoring, provide one drawing of a crocodile eating Dylan McDermott and another one of an alligator eating Dermot Mulroney.

You can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person GMAT courses absolutely free! We’re not kidding. Check out our upcoming courses here.

ImagePatrick Tyrrell is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Los Angeles, California. He has a B.A. in philosophy, a 780 on the GMAT, and relentless enthusiasm for his work. In addition to teaching test prep since 2006, he’s also an avid songwriter/musician. Check out Patrick’s upcoming GMAT courses here!

The post Inference Questions: The Black Sheep of the GMAT Critical Reasoning Family appeared first on GMAT.
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How to Study for the Executive Assessment (EA) – Part 2  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2020, 22:01
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: How to Study for the Executive Assessment (EA) – Part 2
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/01/mprep-blogimages-wave1-53-e1578975233224.png[/img]

Are you preparing for the Executive Assessment exam? [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-1/]In part 1 of this series[/url], we talked about the major study materials you’ll want to use and some guidelines for planning the length of your studies. Today, let’s dive more deeply into the question types and content areas for the Integrated Reasoning and Verbal sections of the Executive Assessment (EA).

[b]Executive Assessment (EA): Integrated Reasoning (IR)[/b]
When talking about the GMAT, I’d normally leave Integrated Reasoning to the last, since this section doesn’t matter as much on the GMAT. On the EA, however, [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/about-executive-assessment/]the IR score is incorporated into your Total score[/url] (along with Quant and Verbal), so you do have to be well-prepared for IR.

As on the GMAT, you will answer 12 IR problems in 30 minutes and you will have access to an on-screen calculator. On the EA, though, you will complete the problems in 2 separate panels of 6 problems each. Within one panel, you can do the problems in any order you like. Some people like to go through first and answer just the ones that seem easy to them, then do a second pass to try the harder ones.

You’ll also need to keep track of your timing. At approximately the halfway mark, you’ll want to submit the first panel and start working on the second one; once you do this, you can’t go back to the first panel, so there’s a psychological factor to take into account. We’ll talk more about timing in the [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-3/]next installment of this series[/url], but I do want to introduce one idea now: the “bail” problem.

A “bail” problem is one that you just don’t want to do. (Okay…that’s all of them. But it’s one that you actually are not going to do.) Assume that you’re going to bail on one problem per panel—you’re literally just going to guess in 3 seconds and reallocate that time to other problems in the section.

Why? Unless you’re trying to get everything right so you can [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/jobs/instructor/]teach for us[/url]…you don’t need to get everything right. And standardized tests are notorious for not giving us enough time to answer all the questions to the best of our ability. So rather than spreading 30 minutes across 12 problems, spread that 30 minutes across 10 problems and give yourself a better chance of actually answering a majority of those 10 correctly. We’ll talk more about this in the final installment of this series—just plant in your brain right now the idea that you are *not* going to try to do it all.

There are four IR problem types. If you manipulate and analyze data at your job already, then at least two of these problem types will feel not-too-weird to you: Tables and Graphs. Multi-Source Reasoning (MSR) problems can be a little more complicated, but they are primarily about synthesizing data and information from multiple sources—presumably you already do this on a daily basis at work. The fourth IR type, Two-Part, is a pretty classic “standardized-test” type of problem: You’re asked a multiple-choice problem and have to solve for or find the answer (the twist, as the name Two-Part implies: You have to find two answers for each problem).

The more verbal- or analytical-reasoning questions do not require any outside factual knowledge, but you will need some factual knowledge for the more quant-focused questions. The released official IR questions test the following quantitative concepts:

[list]
[*][b]Arithmetic[/b], including such concepts as PEMDAS and unit conversion, as well as manipulations involving fractions, percents (including interest rate), and ratios.[/*]
[*][b]Algebra[/b], including linear equations and formulas / functions / sequences. The latter can sometimes be quite advanced—those are good “bail” questions (guess and move on).[/*]
[*][b]Applied[/b] (story) problems, including a lot of statistics (average, weighted average, median, and correlation), as well as some rates & work and general applied story problems (translate and solve).[/*]
[*][b]Geometry[/b] includes some very basic “common sense” geometry (e.g., knowing that the square footage of a room can be found by multiplying the length and width). You don’t need to know any “real” geometry formulas / concepts for IR.[/*]
[/list]
Want to try one? GMAC has posted some official [url=https://www.gmac.com/executive-assessment/prepare/integrated-reasoning-section]sample IR questions[/url] on its website.

I mentioned earlier that our [url=https://www.amazon.com/GMAT-Integrated-Reasoning-Essay-Resources/dp/1506219675/]Integrated Reasoning & Essay guide[/url] says GMAT on the front cover but actually fully includes EA strategy as well as GMAT strategy in the guide itself. (Every time we talk overall strategy, the book will have two sections: one for EA and one for GMAT. If you use this guide, read the EA part and skip the GMAT part.)

[b]Executive Assessment (EA): [/b][b]Verbal Reasoning[/b]
The Verbal section on the EA will consist of the same three problem types that appear on the Verbal section of the GMAT, but you’ll only have to answer 14 problems. You’ll have 30 minutes or approximately 2 minutes and 8 seconds per problem (on average), and you’ll answer in two panels of 7 problems each.

[b]Sentence Correction (SC)[/b]
SC problems are grammar problems: You’ll be given a sentence and 5 answer choices, representing variations on that sentence. You have to say which version of the sentence is the best one—logical, unambiguous, and without any grammar errors. Plan to study all major rules and areas for SC: meaning, sentence structure, modifiers, parallelism & comparisons, and so on.

If you’ve never had a solid grounding in grammar (including how to recognize different parts of speech), then you may want to start with something like our [url=https://www.amazon.com/GMAT-Foundations-Verbal-Practice-Manhattan/dp/1506249892]Foundations of Verbal strategy guide[/url] and work your way up to the regular Sentence Correction unit in our [url=https://www.amazon.com/GMAT-All-Verbal-definitive-Manhattan/dp/1506249043]All the Verbal strategy guide[/url]. In that second book, learn the main lessons for the major grammar topics and ignore anything that the book says is more advanced or more rarely tested (especially in the advanced chapters found in the All the Verbal Companion ebook that comes with the physical book).

The [url=https://www.gmac.com/executive-assessment/prepare/verbal-section/sentence-correction-sample-questions]sample SC questions[/url] posted on GMAC’s site are skewed a little toward the easier-to-medium side, but they’re a good introduction to the problem type.

[b]Critical Reasoning (CR)[/b]
CR problems provide you with a short argument or plan and ask you to critique it in some way. You might be asked to do something with the conclusion (strengthen it, weaken it, identify an assumption underlying it). You might be asked to give a conclusion (inference) or fix a problem (explain a discrepancy).

The official EA CR questions cover the full range of [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-master-every-gmat-critical-reasoning-question-type/]GMAT CR question types[/url], with an emphasis towards Inference and Strengthen questions. There are also a decent number of Weaken, Find the Assumption, and Discrepancy questions.

We can’t necessarily assume that the official test will follow these same trends. The GMAT tends to emphasize Find the Assumption and Weaken at about the same rate as Strengthen and Inference, so I would expect something similar to hold true for the EA. If you use the CR unit of our All the Verbal strategy guide, study the whole unit but prioritize Strengthen, Weaken, Find the Assumption, and Inference. The Companion ebook that comes with this strategy guide includes an extra chapter on wrong answer analysis for CR that you might find useful.

Here are some official [url=https://www.gmac.com/executive-assessment/prepare/verbal-section/critical-reasoning-sample-questions]sample CR problems[/url].

[b]Reading Comprehension (RC)[/b]
This is a classic standardized test problem type: You read several paragraphs of information and then answer several questions about that same passage. So far, our teachers taking the real exam have all been given one RC passage with 4 related questions. We have a small number of data points so far, but we’re assuming that this is the standard pattern and most people will see this.

The passages and question types in the EA official tool run the gamut—Science, Social Science, and Business topics, and all of the usual question types. As on the GMAT, Specific Detail and Inference questions are by far the most common, with a smattering of Primary Purpose / Main Idea and various minor types.

As with the rest of verbal, use the entire RC unit in our All the Verbal Strategy guide. In short: You can really use everything in the [url=https://www.amazon.com/GMAT-All-Verbal-definitive-Manhattan/dp/1506249043]All the Verbal Strategy guide[/url].

And finally, here are some official [url=https://www.gmac.com/executive-assessment/prepare/verbal-section/reading-comprehension-sample-questions]sample RC problems[/url]. Note: These sample problems are shown one at a time—one passage and one problem. The real test will always give you one passage and all of its accompanying problems together in a row. They won’t split up the problems the way this sample set does.

That’s it for IR and Verbal. Next time, we’ll talk about the Quant section as well as overall study strategies.

[b]NEXT: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-3/]How to Study for the Executive Assessment (Part 3)[/url]

[b]For information about our Executive Assessment Complete Course [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/executive-assessment/][b]click here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/stacey-koprince/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceBioLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog][img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2015/06/stacey-koprince-150x150.png[/img][/url]



[b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/stacey-koprince/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceBioLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog]Stacey Koprince[/url] is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Montreal, Canada and Los Angeles, California.[/b] Stacey has been teaching the GMAT, GRE, and LSAT  for more than 15 years and is one of the most well-known instructors in the industry. Stacey loves to teach and is absolutely fascinated by standardized tests. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceCoursesLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog#instructor/86]Check out Stacey’s upcoming GMAT courses here[/url].

The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-2/]How to Study for the Executive Assessment (EA) – Part 2[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
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How to Study for the Executive Assessment (EA) – Part 3  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jan 2020, 22:01
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: How to Study for the Executive Assessment (EA) – Part 3
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/01/mprep-blogimages-wave1-52-1-e1578976294596.png[/img]

Are you preparing for the Executive Assessment exam? In [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-1/]part 1[/url] of this series, we talked about the major study materials you’ll want to use and some guidelines for planning the length of your studies. In [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-2/]part 2[/url], we dove more deeply into the question types and content areas for the Integrated Reasoning and Verbal sections of the Executive Assessment (EA).

Now, we’re going to do the same for the Quant section; we’re also going to talk a bit more about study planning.

[b]Executive Assessment (EA): Quantitative Reasoning[/b]
The Quant section will consist of the same two question types (Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency) that appear on the Quant section of the GMAT, but you’ll only have to answer 14 of them. You’ll be given 30 minutes or just over 2 minutes per question; this is about the same as on the GMAT.

The single biggest difference is that geometry* has been removed from the EA. But, yes, I had to add an asterisk there. Did you know that, among mathematicians, coordinate plane is considered algebra, not geometry? (I learned this in high school…but I completely forgot until it came up again for the EA.) So it’s true that geometry is not on the EA…but since coordinate plane is really algebra, it can show up on the EA.

I find that a little annoying, but I was heartened to see that, of the 100 quant questions in the EA official tool, exactly one is a geometry problem. So I went into my EA just assuming that I would ignore any coordinate plane questions I might see—and I didn’t see any at all. (I do, of course, know geometry, since I also teach the GMAT, but I wanted to take the EA in the way that I’m advising my students to take it.) I have had students see a geometry problem, but I haven’t (yet) had anyone tell me that they’ve seen more than one.

So, best guess, you’ll see either 0 or 1 coordinate plane problem…so decide whether that is worth any of your precious study time. I personally would not study it and would just make that one of my bail questions (more about this in [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-2/]part 2[/url]).

If you’ve studied for the GMAT and are familiar with the strategies Choose Smart Numbers, Work Backwards, and Test Cases, you can definitely use these strategies on the EA, too. You also can (and should!) estimate—I found I was able to do this even more than on the GMAT.

As far as the rest of the quant material, the EA appears to test everything else that the GMAT tests. If you’re using our books to study, I would emphasize the following:

[url=https://www.amazon.com/GMAT-Foundations-Math-Practice-Manhattan/dp/1506207642][b]GMAT Foundations of Math[/b][/url]
Nearly everything! [url=https://www.amazon.com/GMAT-Foundations-Math-Practice-Manhattan/dp/1506207642]We use this book heavily[/url] in our [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/executive-assessment/]EA live course[/url].

You can skip geometry entirely or look just at coordinate plane, if you want. Otherwise, do learn the rest of this guide. (Although the title says GMAT, everything in this guide applies to the EA with the exception of most of the geometry topics.)

[url=https://www.amazon.com/GMAT-All-Quant-definitive-Manhattan/dp/1506248543][b]All the Quant[/b][/url]
[url=https://www.amazon.com/GMAT-All-Quant-definitive-Manhattan/dp/1506248543]This book[/url] is split into 5 units by major content area. Within each unit, there are also strategy chapters—how to do Data Sufficiency, for example, or a series on Arithmetic vs. Algebra. Do all of the strategy chapters in every unit except for geometry.

For math topics, I’ll list the specific areas within each unit that are most likely to show up on the EA.

[b]Unit 1: Fractions, Decimals, Percents, and Ratios[/b]

– Fractions

– Percents

– Ratios

– For an extra-high quant score: Digits and decimals

[b]Unit 2: Algebra[/b]

– Exponents

– Roots

– Linear equations and combos

– The basics of inequalities and max/min

– For an extra-high quant score: Quadratics and formulas

[b]Unit 3: Word Problems[/b]

– Translations

– Statistics (average, median, weighted average)

– Rates

– For an extra-high quant score: Work and overlapping sets

[b]Unit 4: Number Properties[/b]

– Divisibility and prime

– Odd, Even, Positive, Negative

– For an extra-high quant score: Probability and/or combinatorics—but only if you like these topics

[b]Unit 5: Geometry[/b]

– Nothing, unless you like coordinate plane (but nothing more than that!)

The All the Quant guide comes with an accompanying ebook containing advanced math topics—no need to study any of them.

[b]Setting up your studies[/b]
Big picture, most people will need to do more work on quant than on verbal or IR to start—just remember that you are going to have to build those skills, too. I’m going to recommend the same general structure that we use in our courses.

Begin by gaining a good grounding in the foundational-level material, particularly math topics that you learned when you were 11. Does PEMDAS, aka order of operations, ring a vague bell? Do you remember how to add fractions or solve an equation? It’s deep in your brain somewhere—you just have to remind yourself and do some practice to get the skills back.

Give yourself a couple of weeks for this level. (If you take one of our courses, we do build this into the program—but I would recommend signing up for a course that doesn’t start for ~2-3 weeks and then working through as much of the Foundations of Math material as you can before the course starts.)

When you need a break from the Quant stuff, familiarize yourself with the different verbal and IR question types and how they work. When you feel okay about your ability to do math on paper again (you don’t have to feel great—just okay), start diving in earnest into the three main strategy guides (IR & Essay, All the Quant, and All the Verbal). Use my earlier guidelines to decide what to prioritize and in what order you want to do things.

I don’t recommend doing all of one section of the exam and only then moving on to another section. Your brain actually learns better when you’re moving among topics. (It feels harder that way—but that’s a sign that your brain is actually learning better. It’s like physical activity—you know it was a good workout or game when it actually tires you out a bit.)

Plan to study multiple days a week (ideally 4 to 6 days)—it’s far better to do a little every day than to do nothing all week and then try to cram in 6 hours of study on Sunday. Your brain can only learn so much in a day; then it needs to go to sleep and make good memories of everything you learned before you can start to layer more on top.

Set up a study calendar that goes something like this:

[b]Day 1[/b]: Quant (Fractions and Ratios); Verbal (SC)

[b]Day 2[/b]: Quant (Data Sufficiency); IR (Tables)

[b]Day 3[/b]: Quant (Percents); Verbal (CR)

[b]Day 4[/b]: Break

[b]Day 5[/b]: Quant (review and practice problems); IR (Tables)

[b]Day 6[/b]: IR and Verbal review and practice problems

[b]Day 7[/b]: What went well and what needs more work? Set up next week.

Plan out specific study appointments (with assignments / topics) for the upcoming week. Have an idea of what you want to do the week after that, but don’t actually plan out the day-to-day until you see how this week goes. You may have to go back over a certain area again—or you may discover that you’re already good at something and can go faster or reallocate some time to a different area.

After about a week or two, take a practice test ([url=https://www.gmac.com/executive-assessment/prepare/official-prep]GMAC sells 4 official practice tests[/url]). Spend a couple of days analyzing it after. Pay more attention to the areas you’ve already studied—how did they go? What stuck and what needs a review?

For the areas you haven’t studied yet, does your test performance indicate any areas you should prioritize—or de-prioritize? (There are two areas to de-prioritize: The things you’re already good at and the things that you’re really not good at. Don’t spend time learning the hardest material—first, learn the material that’s not as hard for you. You may discover that that gets you to your goal score and you never have to learn the hardest-for-you stuff!)

Then, go set up next week’s study plan taking that practice test analysis into account. As you go, continue to take a practice test every couple of weeks—both to gauge how you’re progressing and to help you diagnose your strengths and weaknesses so you can set up an effective study plan for the coming couple of weeks.

[b]Practice under timed conditions[/b]
It’s critically important to do practice problems under test-like conditions, including timing. At heart, the EA is an executive reasoning / decision-making test, even while it tests you on math, logic, and grammar. As you do every day at work, you’re going to have to distinguish between good, mediocre, and bad opportunities and decide how to spend your limited time and mental energy accordingly.

You can study problems as long as you want after you’re done trying them—but when you first try them, time yourself and hold yourself to standard timing conditions. Also use your studies to figure out what you don’t want to do, so you know when to bail on the test.

And that’s exactly what we’re going to dive into next time!

[b]NEXT: [/b]How to Study for the Executive Assessment (Part 4)

[b]For information about our Executive Assessment Complete Course [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/executive-assessment/][b]click here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/stacey-koprince/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceBioLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog][img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2015/06/stacey-koprince-150x150.png[/img][/url]



[b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/stacey-koprince/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceBioLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog]Stacey Koprince[/url] is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Montreal, Canada and Los Angeles, California.[/b] Stacey has been teaching the GMAT, GRE, and LSAT  for more than 15 years and is one of the most well-known instructors in the industry. Stacey loves to teach and is absolutely fascinated by standardized tests. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceCoursesLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog#instructor/86]Check out Stacey’s upcoming GMAT courses here[/url].

The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-3/]How to Study for the Executive Assessment (EA) – Part 3[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
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How to Study for the Executive Assessment (EA) – Part 4  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2020, 09:01
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: How to Study for the Executive Assessment (EA) – Part 4
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/01/mprep-blogimages-wave1-54-e1579014067916.png[/img]

Are you preparing for the Executive Assessment (EA) exam? In [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-1/]part 1[/url] of this series, we talked about the major study materials you’ll want to use and some guidelines for planning the length of your studies. In [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-2/]part 2[/url] and [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-3/]part 3[/url], we dove more deeply into the question types and content areas for the Integrated Reasoning, Verbal, and Quant sections of the exam and we also talked about overall study planning.

In the final installment of this series (this one, right now!), we’re going to dive into time management on the Executive Assessment.

[b]Time management on the Executive Assessment (EA): The basics[/b]
Each section is 30 minutes long and has either 12 or 14 questions, so you have a bit over 2 minutes, on average, to answer each question.

As I mentioned earlier, you don’t want to try to answer everything. An average of 2 minutes is just not enough time! I’m actually going to recommend that you plan to bail on 2 or 3 questions per section—guess within the first 15-30 seconds and go spend that precious time elsewhere. If you follow this recommendation, then you can average 2.5 minutes per Quant and Verbal question and a whopping 3 minutes per Integrated Reasoning question.

As a reminder, the questions will be split into two panels per section, so you’ll have six or seven problems in each panel. Plan to bail on one question per panel; if you hit a second really annoying problem in one of the panels, give yourself the freedom to bail on one extra question (for a total of three across both panels).

Before you go in, have a list of Bail Categories—things you hate and know that you’re not very good at. In my case, I bail instantly on combinatorics and I’m also going to bail on what I call Too Annoying To Do problems. An example of the latter: A Roman numeral problem (3 questions for the price of 1!) that has 4+ variables (ugh) plus some other annoying feature, such as absolute value symbols on both sides of an equation. Basically, know what annoys you and, when you see too many annoying details in a single question, get out fast.

[b]Marking questions for later[/b]
What if you’re not sure whether you want to bail? Or maybe you see something that you can do, but you think it will take you longer than average. As you work through any one panel, you’ll be given the option to mark questions to return to later (as long as you are still on that panel). At the end of that panel, you can see a list of any questions you marked and then jump right back to a particular question. This is a great feature as long as you know when and how to use it—and when and how not to use it.

First, note that you do need to make a distinction between marking and bailing. When you decide that something isn’t worth doing ever, don’t mark it for later “just in case.” Make the executive decision, put in a random answer, and move on forever. (Do put in a random answer—there’s no penalty for getting something wrong.)

Next, when you do decide to mark something, still put in a random answer right now. It’s possible that you might not make it back later, and you don’t want to waste a chance to get lucky.

Let’s see how this all plays out section by section.

[b]EA time management: Integrated Reasoning[/b]
In IR, bailing on 2 or 3 questions will leave you just 9 or 10 questions to do, so you’ll be answering 4 or 5 questions per panel. You’ll have 30 minutes to do those problems and your goal is to use approximately half the time (15 minutes) for each panel.

First, let’s define “bail” questions. Don’t try to do it. Don’t try to make an educated guess. Don’t even mark it to come back later. Just pick randomly, move on, and forget about this one forever.

Bail on these kinds of questions:

[list]
[*]This is a big weakness of yours[/*]
[*]You’ve read the problem and don’t understand what they’re asking or telling you—or you have no idea what to do with that information[/*]
[*]You think you might know how to do it, but it would take you way too long (>4 minutes)[/*]
[/list]
Now, let’s talk about the ones you do want to mark for a possible later return. First, be stingy. Generally speaking, mark only one per panel; at the most, mark two. You’re not going to have a ton of time left at the end; the last thing you want to do is spend a minute trying to figure out which of 3 marked problems you should actually return to…and then run out of time before you can try any of them.

When you mark a question for a possible later return, also put in a random answer right now. You may not actually make it back to this problem later, so it’s better to have a guess locked in, just in case. As I mentioned, there’s no penalty for getting something wrong.

Mark these kinds of questions:

[list]
[*]You know how to do this but it will take somewhat longer than average (3.5 to 4 minutes)[/*]
[*]You’re thinking, “I know how to do this! I just did it last week! But I’m blanking right now.”[/*]
[/list]
For the first category, you just want to make sure that you don’t prevent yourself from getting to the last two questions because you spent extra time on one long one earlier. Save that long one for last, just in case.

The second category is something that is in your brain somewhere, but you’re having trouble pulling up the memory right now. Sometimes, if we set the thing aside for 5 or 10 minutes, our brains will continue trying to figure it out subconsciously and then, when we look at it again, we’ll retrieve the memory: Oh, yeah! This is how to do this problem!

So if you run into one of those, “But I know how to do this!” problems, don’t waste time trying to retrieve the memory right now. Let it percolate in the back of your brain while you do other stuff—then come back at the end (if you have time) to see whether you can pull up the memory now.

How does this play out? The first panel pops up. On your first run through the problems, you’re going to bail fast on one and save one for later, so you’re going to try to answer four. (And maybe you bail on two or save two for later, so you try to answer three.)

When you get to the end of the first panel, the test is going to ask whether you’re ready to move to the next one. Glance at the timer, which will be counting down from 30 minutes. How far are you from 15 minutes left?

IR questions typically require 2-3 minutes, so we’re going to be pretty strict about timing. If the number is higher than 16 or higher, notice how much time you still have before you get to 15, then go to your marked question (or, if you marked two, glance at each quickly and pick one) and get to work. When you’re done, glance at the timer again and decide from there whether to try another problem or to close out this panel and move to the next panel.

If you have fewer than 16 minutes left, however, it’s time to move to the next panel.

[b]EA time management: Verbal and Quant[/b]
Quant and Verbal will work very similarly, except that you’ll be answering 7 questions per panel rather than 6—so you’ll have a little bit less time per problem, on average. (But Q and V problems are also not as complicated—usually—as IR problems.)

Still bail on one problem per panel (and you can bail on one extra in one of the panels). Still mark one problem to come back to (or maybe two).

Some Quant and Verbal problems can be answered in 1-2 minutes, so you’ve got a judgment call to make:

[list]
[*]14 or fewer minutes left? Go to the second panel; don’t go back to any marked questions from the first panel.[/*]
[*]More than 14 minutes left? You have a decision to make: Should you return to a marked question in the first panel or move on to the second panel?[/*]
[/list]
If you’re in the second situation, it will depend both on how much time you have and what your marked problem looks like.

If you’re already below the 15-minute mark, give yourself 10 seconds to look at your marked problem. If it falls in the category, “Oh yeah, I remember how to do this now, and it’s something I can do in a minute!” then go for it. Otherwise, move on.

If you have more than 15 minutes left, still take a look at your marked problem. If you know how to do it but it’s going to take 2+ minutes, only move ahead if you still have the time to do it and move to the second panel with 15 (or more) minutes left.

If you’re blanking on it or you find yourself thinking any variation of, “But I should know how to do this…”—forget about it. Move to the next panel.

[b]In sum[/b]
If you’re coming to the EA from the GMAT, make sure you educate yourself on the [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/should-i-take-the-gmat-or-the-executive-assessment/]major differences between the two exams[/url]. There aren’t many—but you will need to make some adjustments, especially in the area of time management.

[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-1/]Plan for a minimum of 4 weeks[/url] and probably closer to 6 to 8 (since you have lots of other things going on in your life too, right?). If you need a higher-than-average score or are extra-busy and can’t study much, you may need closer to 3 to 4 months.

Study [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-2/]IR, Verbal[/url], and [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/how-to-study-for-the-executive-assessment-ea-part-3/]Quant[/url] pretty equally—you’re looking to get fairly even scores across all three sections, as much as possible. If you’re going for an EMBA, your total score goal (as of this writing) is 150+, and if you’re going for a regular MBA, your score goal is 155+—but do some research yourself whenever you are reading this to make sure things haven’t changed.

You’re going to want to practice from the official EA tools available—but you’re also going to need some test-prep-company materials to teach you the underlying skills and content for the exam. And you’re going to need to set up a study plan for yourself.

Good luck and happy studying!

[b]KEEP READING: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/what-the-executive-assessment-really-tests/]What the Executive Assessment Really Tests[/url]

[b]For information about our Executive Assessment Complete Course [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/executive-assessment/][b]click here[/b][/url][b].[/b]

[url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/stacey-koprince/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceBioLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog][img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2015/06/stacey-koprince-150x150.png[/img][/url]



[b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/instructors/stacey-koprince/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceBioLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog]Stacey Koprince[/url] is a Manhattan Prep instructor based in Montreal, Canada and Los Angeles, California.[/b] Stacey has been teaching the GMAT, GRE, and LSAT  for more than 15 years and is one of the most well-known instructors in the industry. Stacey loves to teach and is absolutely fascinated by standardized tests. [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/classes/?utm_source=manhattanprep.com%2Fgmat%2Fblog&utm_medium=blog&utm_content=KoprinceCoursesLinkGMATBlog&utm_campaign=GMAT%20Blog#instructor/86]Check out Stacey’s upcoming GMAT courses here[/url].

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Business School Application Requirements: An Overview  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jan 2020, 16:00
FROM Manhattan GMAT Blog: Business School Application Requirements: An Overview
[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/01/mprep-blogimages-wave1-39-1-e1579644265791.png[/img]

At first glance, applying to business school can seem overwhelming. But at the end of the day, this comprehensive process gives you a chance to show admissions officers who you really are and what differentiates you from other applicants. We will break down the requirements, but these are the basic components of the business school application:

[list]
[*]Test scores, GPA, and transcript[/*]
[*]Resume[/*]
[*]Essays[/*]
[*]Short-answer responses[/*]
[*]Letter(s) of recommendation[/*]
[*]Interview [/*]
[/list]
[b]Test scores, GPA, and transcript:[/b] These numbers help the schools evaluate your academic fit with the program. The MBA is a fast-paced, quantitative-heavy degree, and they want to be sure you can handle it. The admissions committee determines this by considering various sources of academic information. To apply, you will need to submit a valid [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/what-is-the-gmat-2/]GMAT[/url] or [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gre/prep/]GRE[/url] test score (some schools also accept the [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/about-executive-assessment/]Executive Assessment[/url]). You will also need to submit proof that you completed an undergraduate degree and provide information about your coursework and grades. If you did not attend an English language-based institution, most programs will also require a TOEFL score.

[b]Resume:[/b] Most programs will require you to provide a professional resume. Your resume provides admissions officers with an overview of your story and your trajectory. They are looking to understand what you have accomplished in your career (and life!) so far. In addition to career accomplishments, your resume should also include information about your academic history and any community or personal achievements.

[b]Essays:[/b] Each school has specific essay requirements. For example, some require just one essay while others require multiple, and word counts will vary. Regardless, this is the part of the application where you get to show admissions officers who you are, what differentiates you, and how you would fit into their program. It is important to take the time to brainstorm what each school’s questions are asking and how you can best answer them based on your life experiences. It is also important to make sure you answer the question being asked and that you do so in a thorough way. Almost all programs will ask in some way about your goals and your fit with their program, so be sure to have done your homework and to give details about how you would get involved and make an impact. Additionally, if you have any unexplained circumstances in your application—such as a low GPA, low test score, or gap in work experience—you can use the optional essay to briefly explain the situation.

[b]Short-answer responses: [/b]Each school will require you to complete a base application consisting of questions about your background, family history, education, professional experience, community involvement, and other basic information about you. Some will also include questions about your goals or interest in their program. This part of the application can be time-consuming and somewhat tedious, so strive to complete it sooner rather than later.

[b]Letter(s) of recommendation: [/b]Most business schools will require one or two letters of recommendation. These should almost always come from people who know you in a professional context. It is important to choose recommenders who know you well and can discuss specific examples of your work. For example, it is not enough for the recommender to say you are a strong leader or a team player—they need to actually discuss and demonstrate who you are through real-life examples. It is also, of course, important to choose people whom you believe would portray you in the most positive light. Please note that many business schools ask recommenders similar questions, but they are not identical, so your recommenders will need to make sure they are providing the information asked for each program.

[b]Interview: [/b]Each school handles interviews in its own way, but in general, most offer interviews only to select candidates who pass an initial successful review. The MBA interview is an opportunity to continue to show admissions officers who you are, why you are interested in their program, and how you would fit in. This is also where they get to see your personality and interpersonal skills. The interviews are generally 30 minutes long, conducted by admissions officers or trained second-year students or alumni, and take place on or off-campus. We know the interview may seem daunting, but remember that you already have all the answers—the MBA interview is all about you!

[b]Business School Application Requirements: Takeaways[/b]
Each component of the business school application is important, but because of the holistic nature of this process, it is possible for candidates to succeed even if they are not equally strong in all areas (for example, a lower test score may be offset by an otherwise solid application). MBA application requirements allow you to provide a complete view of who you are and why you deserve a place in a school’s program!

If you are looking for some guidance on your business school applications or wondering how much time each application component will actually take to prepare, we encourage you to sign up for a [url=http://mbamission.com/consult]free 30-minute consultation[/url] with mbaMission. During this session, we will honestly assess your candidacy and recommend what we truly feel is best for you.

[b]RELATED: [/b][url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/when-take-the-gmat/]When Should I Take the GMAT? [/url]

[img]https://cdn2.manhattanprep.com/gmat/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/01/business-school-application-requirements-mprep-225x300.png[/img]

[url=https://www.mbamission.com/who-we-are/team/kim-leb/][b]Kim Leb[/b][/url] has been assisting and encouraging MBA applicants in their business school pursuits since 2012 and truly enjoys all aspects of the admissions process. Also accepted to the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia Business School, she ultimately decided to pursue her MBA at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, where she was awarded a merit-based full scholarship. While there, she interviewed applicants to the full-time MBA program as a member of the Ross Admissions Student Committee.

[url=http://www.mbamission.com/][b]mbaMission[/b][/url] is the leader in MBA admissions consulting with a full-time and comprehensively trained staff of consultants, all with profound communications and MBA experience. mbaMission has helped thousands of candidates fulfill their dream of attending prominent MBA programs around the world. Take your first step toward a more successful MBA application experience with a free 30-minute consultation with one of mbaMission’s senior consultants.

The post [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/blog/business-school-application-requirements-an-overview/]Business School Application Requirements: An Overview[/url] appeared first on [url=https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat]GMAT[/url].
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Business School Application Requirements: An Overview   [#permalink] 21 Jan 2020, 16:00

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